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Need to replace electrical switch on my 818P Jet metal bench lathe with milling head

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  • #31
    Originally posted by yellow_cad View Post
    I am fine with doing new switches, but I cannot determine what switch or switches I would use to make my unit function. At a minimum, I need forward and reverse for two phases and a stop button so 5 function and 6 if the mill is incorporated into the switch. The mill could easily be done with a switch that turns the motor on in one direction.
    I think you will be lucky to find any switch that will work in the factory location, you might but prepared to use an additional box to house the switches.

    Without seeing the wiring diagram, I think you can get switches like this to work. I would use a 2 position for the hi/low speed and a 3 position switch for the fwd\rev with the center position being off. Just make sure the contacts have an amp rating to cover your motor.

    Note the switch in the link below only has 1 set of contacts on the back, you can add an additional set to that switch.

    https://www.automationdirect.com/adc...MaAi_wEALw_wcB

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
      https://www.automationdirect.com/adc...%20asc&start=0

      Look at the Rotary Cam Transfer Switch for high and low
      and the Rotary Cam Reversing Switch for reversing.

      ----Doozer
      What Doozer said on page 1 would also work for you.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by yellow_cad View Post

        What I need right now is to understand the types of switches that you refer to if I need to start from scratch. Can you post some links that show specific switches?
        It would be a variety of switches since they can't be coupled like the present ones. So a new switch panel would be needed for sure.

        First switch would be a main power switch. This would feed power to the secondary "steering" switches that would then select high or low speed operation. Then that would feed to the forward/reverse switch. So three switches just to run the lathe portion. And the main power switch would also feed through a "mill head" switch to run the milling head motor.

        So quite a kludge. And no, I can't point directly to any specific switches at the moment since we don't really know how it is wired. But the mains switch might be one of these safety paddle style switches. And the downstream switches to control speed and direction likely just big high current toggle switches with contacts arrangements as required.

        POWERTEC 71007 110/220V Paddle Switch, Electrical - Amazon Canada
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #34
          Is the switch that is in my lathe/mill now an outdated way to do its job? Because if it is and the type of switch you link Oxford would work instead, then I could have five toggling function switches (1-forward low speed, 2-reverse low speed, 3-forward high speed, 4-reverse high speed, 5-mill off/on, and a separate overall stop switch that stops all of the functions. And, I could make a plate that housed these and have the switches come up out of the electrical box like the present one do. If that is all OK then great, but I am still fuzzy on incorporating the capacitors.

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          • #35
            OK BCRider, the paddle switch makes sense, now can I use the switch that Oxford linked for the other functions? Any thoughts on the capacitors?

            Oxford's link - https://www.automationdirect.com/adc...MaAi_wEALw_wcB

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            • #36
              Switches of that sort could certainly be used for the "downstream option" setting. That particular one in the link is listed as only a single contact. So at best it would be used for just turning on the motor for the milling head by switching the hot side. If running 220v though you would need a double pole single throw type to switch out both of the hot leads. the single pole single throw only works for 110 where you chop the hot side and the neutral is the only wire left without a switch.

              You'd just use the stock capacitors that are in there now. They are either starting caps or they are used for some sort of phase shift to get your high or low speed. Either way they need to stay in the circuit and the new switches simply fit on the ends of the wires as required by the schematic. Same with switch shopping. The schematic, once you get it, will show any linked switch poles s a dashed line connecting switches on the diagram.

              That's all I can answer in anything other than "maybe" and "it depends" until you have the schematic to see what the switches do and how many poles each is using. Once we see that if you can't get the old switch bank fixed then any number of us on here can help with coming up with a new switch board for your needs.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #37
                Not a bad idea.

                I guess I was thinking of the less the disassembly, the better chance of having it back in working condition. Many people get real confused about wiring. I recently had a compressor in my shop that had been mis-wired and it took me several weeks to sort it all out.

                If you are going to mark the wires and their locations on the switch, be sure to use a type of marker that will not wash off in whatever solvent you use.



                Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                If the switch assembly needs the severe cleaning that Paul A suggests, I would carefully document the connections and remove it for cleaning rather than attempting to do it in place. Then you could do it in a tank where you could agitate it, possibly use an ultrasonic clear if available, and have somewhere for the dirty solvent and gunk to drain to. Just my 2 cents.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                • #38
                  Grizzly is pretty good with manuals for their older models. If they really sold a similar model and you can figure out the model number, you can probably download a manual with wiring diagrams.

                  AND, they even may have repair parts. They are somewhat good with that too.



                  Originally posted by yellow_cad View Post

                  Apparently, it is the same model lathe/mill that was sold by Jet (what I have), Enco, and Grizzley.
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                  You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                  • #39
                    If I couldn't get the original switch working I would probably make a small PCB to hold some pushbuttons in the same spot and use a microcontroller to control a couple relays to handle the motors.

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                    • #40
                      I received my schematic so here it is:

                      Click image for larger version

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                      • #41
                        Wow, that diagram is awful.

                        The milling head is simple, you can replace that with a generic switch. Capacitor and white connect together to neutral and the black to hot.

                        The lathe is a but more complicated since they dont show what the switch connects. My guess is the black and cap wire get connected together and to neutral and then yellow and white get connected together to hot for low speed and blue and orange to hot for high speed. When one speed is selected the other two wires need to be separated since they will have voltage on those wires because of the motor acting like a transformer.

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                        • #42
                          Ok, so I was a little confused before and thought all those switches you had pictured earlier were only for the mill operation.

                          I think I have it but can you just confirm the switch operation.

                          Speed 1 and 2 is for the lathe only?

                          Fwd/rev is for the lathe only?

                          The mill has a separate switch, and it is only on, no speeds or reverse?

                          The on/power switch is for the lathe or is it master power for both the lathe and mill?

                          The stop switch will knock any switches that are pushed on, off?

                          Can the lathe and mill head run at the same time?

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by oxford View Post
                            Ok, so I was a little confused before and thought all those switches you had pictured earlier were only for the mill operation.

                            I think I have it but can you just confirm the switch operation.

                            Speed 1 and 2 is for the lathe only? Yes

                            Fwd/rev is for the lathe only? Yes

                            The mill has a separate switch, and it is only on, no speeds or reverse? Yes

                            The on/power switch is for the lathe or is it master power for both the lathe and mill? Each button is an on switch for that particular function - Stop button turns any buttons that are on off

                            The stop switch will knock any switches that are pushed on, off? Yes

                            Can the lathe and mill head run at the same time?
                            I don't know if lathe and mill can run at the same time, but I doubt it

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                            • #44
                              Looking at the diagram again and it does not match your lathe. The diagram has 5 buttons, yours has 6. I think this setup just has one high or low speed. Not sure which.

                              Id say drop the whole switch assy in an ultrasonic cleaner with solvent and see if that cleans it up. The mechanism that works it all is probably full of dried grease at this point.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by macona View Post
                                Looking at the diagram again and it does not match your lathe. The diagram has 5 buttons, yours has 6. I think this setup just has one high or low speed. Not sure which. On the stock switch, two buttons are pushed by a button that covers the two for high speed lathe operation.

                                Id say drop the whole switch assy in an ultrasonic cleaner with solvent and see if that cleans it up. The mechanism that works it all is probably full of dried grease at this point.
                                There is really no grease in the switch box so the switch is pretty clean although I will spray with contact cleaner.

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