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Wonderful wago lever action electrical connecters

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  • #46
    Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post

    Correct by NEC and common sense all wire connections are in boxes and accessible.
    You mean this splice I found above a drop ceiling feeding a fixture wasn't to code???? There wasn't even wire nuts in there.

    Click image for larger version

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    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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    • #47
      Originally posted by gellfex View Post

      There's terminal bars made for that, this product is made for electrical boxes.
      I know, I use them.

      I was just thinkinking about playing with a board, with s many as 50 units, ones, twos, threess and so on.

      Just me being a kid wanting to wire some stuff up fast

      The lever thing is what got me. Still?

      I dont like nicking wires, evern the thin ones..... JR

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      • #48
        Originally posted by JRouche View Post

        I know, I use them.

        I was just thinkinking about playing with a board, with s many as 50 units, ones, twos, threess and so on.

        Just me being a kid wanting to wire some stuff up fast

        The lever thing is what got me. Still?

        I dont like nicking wires, evern the thin ones..... JR
        Haven't you ever made a circuit and was happy about it? So, place some interactive stuff in the circuit, neat. More power, more neat.

        Untill at the age of 14 you have a lasing tube and you dont know what to do. Power off Thats a bread board, US standards. JR

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        • #49
          I also tried those wago flippy lock things as I got a box of them from an electrician friend when doing my kitchen remodel with umpteen LED ceiling lights. He doesn't like them. Nope, me either, they just don't make a good connection. Wiggle them under load and the lights in the circuit flickered. Out they came, and in the trash they went.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by I make chips View Post
            I also tried those wago flippy lock things as I got a box of them from an electrician friend when doing my kitchen remodel with umpteen LED ceiling lights. He doesn't like them. Nope, me either, they just don't make a good connection. Wiggle them under load and the lights in the circuit flickered. Out they came, and in the trash they went.
            Well there you have it! Is there anybody in the courtroom that would like to call "I make chips" a liar? ( 5 second pause) I did not think so --- No further questions your Honor, the prosecution rests...

            (IMC are you sure your electrician acquaintance is a friend? - "I don't like this stuff but I think it's good enough for you")

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            • #51
              Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
              IMC are you sure your electrician acquaintance is a friend? - "I don't like this stuff but I think it's good enough for you")
              Cussed him out the next time we got together.



              *Not to dilute this thread but the LED's still flicker occasionally. This is due to the spendy *#%@ Pass and Seymore effin dimmers on which I will hold my rant for another day.
              I make chips
              Senior Member
              Last edited by I make chips; 11-25-2021, 11:01 AM.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by I make chips View Post

                Cussed him out the next time we got together.
                There ya go,,, as it should be...

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                • #53
                  How about something other than all or nothing? There are some set-ups I change as I work through prototyping, VFD set-ups, etc. I find these are great as I can easily make changes. When I'm happy, then I tend to wire nut everything together.

                  Ron

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Shiseiji View Post
                    How about something other than all or nothing? There are some set-ups I change as I work through prototyping, VFD set-ups, etc. I find these are great as I can easily make changes. When I'm happy, then I tend to wire nut everything together.

                    Ron
                    That's brilliant thinking,,, really talk about an epiphany moment,,, I was just about to post something maybe useful --- if not for the fact that kids could poke their eyes out with the end of the solid wires they would make an excellent toy for them --- think of all the possibilities with connections and also different colored wires and lengths --- it's about as good as lego's in a way...

                    But Ron that's great thinking - makes me want to go out and buy a box of them...

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                    • #55
                      Wago comes in extremely useful on custom motorcycles with digital power management units like Motogadget M-units when you're using 22 - 24 AWG.
                      https://motogadget.com/shop/en/m-unit-blue.html.
                      NOT pretty but they work well without breaking wires.
                      Len

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

                        That's brilliant thinking,,, really talk about an epiphany moment,,, I was just about to post something maybe useful --- if not for the fact that kids could poke their eyes out with the end of the solid wires they would make an excellent toy for them --- think of all the possibilities with connections and also different colored wires and lengths --- it's about as good as lego's in a way...

                        But Ron that's great thinking - makes me want to go out and buy a box of them...
                        Your kind, but thanks. I did some work on electric bicycles and the wiring is almost always a mystery to be figured out. wish I'd had them then.

                        Ron

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                        • #57
                          Another handy thing I was at a mates workshop, he builds machines, wago do a nice range of DIN rail connections as well, easier than a terminal screw missing a wire ( I prefer bootlace crimps myself) but nice to know
                          mark

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                          • #58
                            What I find amazing, is that for years and years solid wire was twisted and soldered. Then rubber tape and friction tape applied, 100's of thousands of houses and businesses were done that way? Then one day the NEC folks decided no more solder, can someone explain that to me? The solder was the hold the splice tight and provide some conductivity but the twisted wires did that.
                            Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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                            • #59
                              They soldered house wires? i don't think iv ever seen that and done a ton of rewires, seen lots of twisted and taped - and knob and tube and stuff but can't remember soldered... I do remember most of it being crazy compared to todays standards --- heck my own attic has burnt boards up there from a long past fire... most likely electrical...

                              although another honorable mention back in the day was chimney fires --- people used to use the chimney alone for the venting of wood burning stoves and such and that's a no-no...
                              A.K. Boomer
                              Senior Member
                              Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 11-25-2021, 04:18 PM.

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                              • #60
                                In this part of the world, soldering is allowed. In fact, when correctly done will make a superior connection and can save on box fill since there are no bulky connectors. Wires even used to come tinned, to make this easier. However, it takes skill and time and would make the job too expensive in this day and age. I'm sure when twist on connectors became available and approved electricians in general were delighted.
                                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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