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Wonderful wago lever action electrical connecters

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  • #76
    I use ferules on all stranded wires except when they go into compression style terminal connectors. The reason I like these connections is that they are heat and vibration resistant. With heat, even ambient temperature changes metal expands and contracts and connections tend to adjust to the space and can become lose. Spring loaded connections compensate for this. If your ferule crimping pliers is not of a good quality, on a screwed connection there will be no problem but Wago and other spring connectors will only press against the ferule and the contact quality is only as good as the crimp.
    Helder Ferreira
    Setubal, Portugal

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    • #77
      This Siemens contactor is rated for 18A and has spring type connections
      You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
      Helder Ferreira
      Setubal, Portugal

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      • #78
        Only ferule type thing iv ever used was the buchanan ground crimps... but then again not an electrician at all here...

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        • #79
          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
          Only ferule type thing iv ever used was the buchanan ground crimps... but then again not an electrician at all here...
          This is again some sort of historic/cultural/geopolitical difference: wire ferrules seem less common in US vs europe.
          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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          • #80
            Hahaaa! You all are funny. Take some simple wire connector into the next world. Hahaahaa

            No one else but us could do it. And I am proud of that. Thats what we do here. Whittle it down to the marrow. JR

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            • #81
              Wago's may be UL approved but remember aluminum Romex wire? . My Wago's will be here today and I will see for myself.
              Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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              • #82
                When I first got the job of wiring a panel it was stranded wire inserted into various do dah things and was told to tin each wire end which was odd I thought because the boot lace ferrules were easily available but it was equipment a using radioactive source and stuff, perhaps the rules were different for high vibration and stuff ( it was a steel guage measurement thing on a rolling mill) I often wondered how to get a bootlace ferrule on an actual bootlace.
                yes I think your right we do pull **** to bits here
                mark

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                • #83
                  I used some Wago connectors once when I needed to extend an earth/ground wire in a fusebox. Once I made the joint (correct size connector for the wire), I realized how poor the joint was and immediately threw all the connectors away. Went back to chocolate blocks and twisted+soldered+taped where needed.

                  The question to ask yourself is "will this connector cope with the 30,000A fault current if there is a short downstream of it?"
                  Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by boslab View Post
                    When I first got the job of wiring a panel it was stranded wire inserted into various do dah things and was told to tin each wire end which was odd I thought because the boot lace ferrules were easily available but it was equipment a using radioactive source and stuff, perhaps the rules were different for high vibration and stuff ( it was a steel guage measurement thing on a rolling mill) I often wondered how to get a bootlace ferrule on an actual bootlace.
                    yes I think your right we do pull **** to bits here
                    mark
                    Soldering is not recommended for wire ends because the solder wicks up the wire and creates a transition where strain can occur. If the wire is going to break, that's where it will do it. Ferrules and other crimp connectors when properly crimped provide a air tight fit that should keep oxygen out and stop corrosion as well. There are several different types of ferrule crimps, some may be more tight than others.

                    NASA has a nice white paper on just about everything you want to know about wire terminations: https://nepp.nasa.gov/files/27631/NSTD87394A.pdf

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Mark Rand View Post
                      I used some Wago connectors once when I needed to extend an earth/ground wire in a fusebox. Once I made the joint (correct size connector for the wire), I realized how poor the joint was and immediately threw all the connectors away. Went back to chocolate blocks and twisted+soldered+taped where needed.

                      The question to ask yourself is "will this connector cope with the 30,000A fault current if there is a short downstream of it?"
                      Where was the fuse that should have stopped the high current? The connector should only have to cope with the amperage the fuse allows to pass.

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                      • #86
                        He is talking about the instantaneous current you see in the wire during a dead short and before the breaker or fuse trips. I have zero doubt they will have any problem with this.

                        This guy tests the lever ones against wire nuts: https://youtu.be/B1pmuRsf1co

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                        • #87
                          A Buchanan crimping tool, the two sizes of ferules and SnapCaps are what live in my electricians box for most work. I do have an assortment of wire nuts in a box for some repairs.
                          ...lew...

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                          • #88
                            I was going to post that I use these all the time for lazy things and in the wall wiring (wire nuts are DEAD to me) with zero issues, but I stepped on one last night and it broke the connection without being visibly shattered, so there's one minor gripe.

                            Other than that, you'd be hard pressed to find a connector that takes such a broad range of wire sizes in stranded or solid and reliably sticks them together up to the states current limits.
                            -paul

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by psomero View Post
                              Other than that, you'd be hard pressed to find a connector that takes such a broad range of wire sizes in stranded or solid and reliably sticks them together up to the states current limits.
                              This can't be overstated. I've used the push-in a lot, but I'm going to order the lever ones specifically for overhead light fixture boxes where I've always found wiring the fixture stranded to cable solid to be a dubious connection where I always have to have a pigtail coming from the main connection out for the fixture wire.

                              Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                              • #90
                                Originally posted by gellfex View Post

                                This can't be overstated. I've used the push-in a lot, but I'm going to order the lever ones specifically for overhead light fixture boxes where I've always found wiring the fixture stranded to cable solid to be a dubious connection where I always have to have a pigtail coming from the main connection out for the fixture wire.
                                Yes very handy ---- along with the one size fits all "auto adjust wrench" and "lifetime transmission fluid"....

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