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Wonderful wago lever action electrical connecters

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  • #91
    Originally posted by macona View Post

    Soldering is not recommended for wire ends because the solder wicks up the wire and creates a transition where strain can occur. If the wire is going to break, that's where it will do it. Ferrules and other crimp connectors when properly crimped provide a air tight fit that should keep oxygen out and stop corrosion as well. There are several different types of ferrule crimps, some may be more tight than others.

    NASA has a nice white paper on just about everything you want to know about wire terminations: https://nepp.nasa.gov/files/27631/NSTD87394A.pdf
    30 years ago so I will forgive the guy who was in charge, further on I was thinking about crimps, the telecom IDC connections (insulation displacement, for the uninitiated) have silicone grease I wonder if crimps would benefit or be hindered by the same?
    Mark

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    • #92
      Check it OUT!!!


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      • #93
        Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
        Check it OUT!!!


        Not new. Seen those more than 15 years ago :P
        Helder Ferreira
        Setubal, Portugal

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        • #94
          Notice that the box exclaims, "Great Gift", not "Works Great".
          A gimmick along the lines of the Ronco Pocket Fisherman.
          https://www.ebay.com/itm/11511183880...QAAOSwXI5hntc2

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          • #95
            30,000A ?

            Even at 240V, that is 8 milliohms or so net resistance. Not gonna happen in any house situation, and very few industrial situations with normal "branch circuits".

            If you have any chance of that, some current limiting fuses are in order. Breakers will not do it.
            2730

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Everything not impossible is compulsory

            Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

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            • #96
              Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
              A Buchanan crimping tool, the two sizes of ferules and SnapCaps are what live in my electricians box for most work. I do have an assortment of wire nuts in a box for some repairs.
              ...lew...
              can you guys explain how you are using ferules? and whats a Snapcap? You're in a box, got solid 14g copper wire to join.....what happens next?
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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              • #97
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                30,000A ?

                Even at 240V, that is 8 milliohms or so net resistance. Not gonna happen in any house situation, and very few industrial situations with normal "branch circuits".

                If you have any chance of that, some current limiting fuses are in order. Breakers will not do it.
                It would have to be a short directly inside the breaker box.

                can you guys explain how you are using ferules? and whats a Snapcap? You're in a box, got solid 14g copper wire to join.....what happens next?
                Ferrules are used to terminate stranded wire. It keeps you from having stray wires that could short to an adjacent terminal and also keeps the strands from smooshing out. The ones with plastic also cover the transition from insulation to the wire. There are also ferrules for joining multiple wires together. Easy to use, strip the wire, slip on the ferrule and crimp.

                For solid wire I use the Wago 773 connectors. They do with with stranded if you are careful but they work way better with solid. If you do use them with stranded do not twist the wire after stripping. The lever style ones work a lot easier with stranded wires.

                Anyway, just shove the 14 ga wire into the wago and youre done.

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                • #98
                  Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                  Notice that the box exclaims, "Great Gift", not "Works Great".
                  A gimmick along the lines of the Ronco Pocket Fisherman.
                  https://www.ebay.com/itm/11511183880...QAAOSwXI5hntc2
                  I was also trying to find a bottle of lifetime transmission fluid to go along with that magical socket,,, I think maybe nobody sells it separately from the transmission, so perhaps it's kinda like magic too - it undergoes some kinda change once you pour it into the tranny. then it becomes lifetime...

                  im still thinking some kinda of "electrical lego's" would be a neat thing to build with those connectors --- they are kinda stylin and the possibilities are endless...
                  A.K. Boomer
                  Senior Member
                  Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 11-29-2021, 12:16 PM.

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                  • #99
                    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                    Check it OUT!!!


                    If they printed VTEC on them you would have bought a dozen :-)

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                    • Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

                      can you guys explain how you are using ferules? and whats a Snapcap? You're in a box, got solid 14g copper wire to join.....what happens next?
                      You strip them, twist them, place a ferule on the twisted, place in the crimping tool and squeze, If the wired extend beyond the ferule trim with the pliers, and snap on the insulator cap. DONE!
                      The crimping tool is a four indent with a stop to locate the ferule.
                      Do you need some pix?? I don't have any that can be linked and haven't used this site up load of pix.
                      ...lew...

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                      • Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post

                        You strip them, twist them, place a ferule on the twisted, place in the crimping tool and squeze, If the wired extend beyond the ferule trim with the pliers, and snap on the insulator cap. DONE!
                        The crimping tool is a four indent with a stop to locate the ferule.
                        Do you need some pix?? I don't have any that can be linked and haven't used this site up load of pix.
                        ...lew...
                        Nooo. Dont twist before you put on the ferrule. Dont twist wires for crimp connections.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by boslab View Post

                          30 years ago so I will forgive the guy who was in charge, further on I was thinking about crimps, the telecom IDC connections (insulation displacement, for the uninitiated) have silicone grease I wonder if crimps would benefit or be hindered by the same?
                          Mark
                          They do make some crimps for outdoor use that have the silicone grease in them. But I dont really ever do anything that is in damp areas so I am not sure what is out there.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by macona View Post

                            It would have to be a short directly inside the breaker box.



                            Ferrules are used to terminate stranded wire. It keeps you from having stray wires that could short to an adjacent terminal and also keeps the strands from smooshing out. The ones with plastic also cover the transition from insulation to the wire. There are also ferrules for joining multiple wires together. Easy to use, strip the wire, slip on the ferrule and crimp.

                            For solid wire I use the Wago 773 connectors. They do with with stranded if you are careful but they work way better with solid. If you do use them with stranded do not twist the wire after stripping. The lever style ones work a lot easier with stranded wires.

                            Anyway, just shove the 14 ga wire into the wago and youre done.
                            Are you talking those crimp on male and female disconnects? still don't 100% get it. I would think the vast majority of wiring DIY's are doing would be solid wire and a heck of a lot of the time you're joining more than two wires. Not sure how a ferrule works for that. Where are I find the Wago really improve things is with multistrand because you can't (well, I can't, or at least its dicey) get a solid connection with mar. It doesn't bite into the wire. I use the lever type only and frankly had not considered them for solid wire. I guess for those pita connections with a ton of wires it would make it easier.
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                            • These connect two wires into one ferrule: https://www.ferrulesdirect.com/colle...-wire-ferrules

                              Lever type are rated for both stranded and solid wired. Watch that video I posted, that guy runs 60 amps though one with 12ga solid. They work fine. The key for stab ins using stranded wire is make sure the wire is not twisted at all before you push it in.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by macona View Post
                                These connect two wires into one ferrule: https://www.ferrulesdirect.com/colle...-wire-ferrules

                                Lever type are rated for both stranded and solid wired. Watch that video I posted, that guy runs 60 amps though one with 12ga solid. They work fine. The key for stab ins using stranded wire is make sure the wire is not twisted at all before you push it in.
                                I got my genuine Wago connectors yesterday and I must say I am impressed. I am going to cut one apart and look inside.

                                BTW the USAF did away with soldering for most aircraft connectors way prior to my time in 1961-65 we were issued two types of crimpers and the best terminals and taught how to use them "The right way!"
                                Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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