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Wanna see what's inside a POS Milwaukee drill chuck?

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  • #31
    Although the video below is from Makita/Australia the tightening procedure is the same for my Rohm chucks, that extra click back, locks the setting, have not had issues with any of my Rohms when using this procedure.
    I think this was actually outlined in the instructions that came with my Bosch tools, it was news to me until that point too. I'm sure there are others too that have missed this important step as I have not seen any of my friends do so and they all look dumb-founded when told to give it that last click back after the normal tighten procedure.

    I can't speak for those that have other types of keyless chucks but for Makita and Rohm this is what is recomended.



    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

    Location: British Columbia

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    • #32
      Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

      Tightens the same under power but getting proper torque for tightening is much harder.
      Most cordless drills nowadays have more than enough power but the problem is control... metal sleeved rohm chuck is super fast way to remove calluses

      Inspired by this thread I ordered Rohm Supra SK E chuck to try. https://www.suncoasttools.com/crm/It...dorNumber=ROHM
      Self-tightening with locking ring for reverse use. Will report in a week or two how this performs.
      Price was lot cheaper as Bosch spare part
      That looks like a nice chuck, similar to the one on my DeWalt "hammer" drill. The only complaint I have about it is that it comes loose after repeated stops because of that damn instant stop brake. Let us know how that lock ring works. I remember reading it now, but totally forgot about that reverse click to lock the chuck too. Going to have to try that.

      As far as tightening under power, maybe if you hold it in a vise. But I doubt it. Mine doesn't ratchet under power even if I try to tighten it with gloves on while powered. Stopping the drill and hand tightening it results in quite a lot of ratchet clicks. This is in the owners manual BTW, falls under RTFM...
      Last edited by eKretz; 12-01-2021, 10:49 AM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Willy View Post
        Although the video below is from Makita/Australia the tightening procedure is the same for my Rohm chucks, that extra click back, locks the setting, have not had issues with any of my Rohms when using this procedure.
        I think this was actually outlined in the instructions that came with my Bosch tools, it was news to me until that point too. I'm sure there are others too that have missed this important step as I have not seen any of my friends do so and they all look dumb-founded when told to give it that last click back after the normal tighten procedure.

        I can't speak for those that have other types of keyless chucks but for Makita and Rohm this is what is recomended.


        Crazy vid, never would have guessed it, I don't think that method is for either of my DeWalts, my old hammer drill has a jacobs and when I do that it does not click backwards just loosens so don't think it's for it, the new one does click back once,

        it could be a possibility because you can tell it's just some kind of "holding" mechanism and does not loosen BUT after that one initial click back it's "free to roam" without too much resistance and I could see it vibrating its way loose in short order as there is no further clicks and it kinda is easy to loosen...

        Im horrible on a keyless --- I just toss a bit in and ram jam it down with the drills own power lol the only thing I pay attention to is getting the chuck close to the size first so when I ram jam it down it does not grab the bit off center lol

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        • #34
          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

          Crazy vid, never would have guessed it, I don't think that method is for either of my DeWalts, my old hammer drill has a jacobs and when I do that it does not click backwards just loosens so don't think it's for it, the new one does click back once,

          it could be a possibility because you can tell it's just some kind of "holding" mechanism and does not loosen BUT after that one initial click back it's "free to roam" without too much resistance and I could see it vibrating its way loose in short order as there is no further clicks and it kinda is easy to loosen...

          Im horrible on a keyless --- I just toss a bit in and ram jam it down with the drills own power lol the only thing I pay attention to is getting the chuck close to the size first so when I ram jam it down it does not grab the bit off center lol
          I agree AK, my Panasonics came with clicky ratchet chucks and were notorious for not being able to center the drill in the jaws, they got replaced ASAP. My old Hitachi came with a gimmicky locking chuck back and forth ring that every time you tried to loosen it was locked, that got 'chucked' as well. Nobody I have ever known in the field does anything but use power to operate the chuck. The cubical drivers that engineer this type of chuck should know that by now, but maybe they are busy with gimmicks and not the real world.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by eKretz View Post

            As far as tightening under power, maybe if you hold it in a vise. But I doubt it. Mine doesn't ratchet under power even if I try to tighten it with gloves on while powered. Stopping the drill and hand tightening it results in quite a lot of ratchet clicks. This is in the owners manual BTW, falls under RTFM...
            Rohm chucks that I have "ratchet" just the same under power or manual twist. Have to listen bit more carefully to hear the clicks under motor groan but it is the same.

            And I can't envision how it would make any difference? Torque is applied to same parts and chuck doesn't know if it is spinning or not?

            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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            • #36
              Like i say, I plan to put an old-school Jacobs 14N super chuck on my 18v Fuel drill. Pretty sure that won't slip or ratchet.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • #37
                Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                Rohm chucks that I have "ratchet" just the same under power or manual twist. Have to listen bit more carefully to hear the clicks under motor groan but it is the same.

                And I can't envision how it would make any difference? Torque is applied to same parts and chuck doesn't know if it is spinning or not?
                I don't know about you, but I sure can't hold the chuck worth a squat under power with bare hands compared to the torque I can apply with it off. Without losing the skin on my hands anyway... The plastic ones are a different story.

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                • #38
                  I can understand why a slip clutch (the thing that clicks) would be built into a chuck. Most people tighten them with power and the clutch is always in the highest setting. So that can easily result in over-tightening with the finer thread used in keyless chucks. Severs over-tightening when the tightening torque runs up against that locked clutch. This, in turn, can result in difficulty in removing the bit or tool and possible damage to the chuck.

                  But I am super curious about that "one back click" thing. Yes, yes, you and the manufacturers say it completes the tightening, but just what does it actually do? Is there some kind of mechanism that actually locks when you do that? If so, it must be quite simple because there isn't much room inside those keyless chucks.

                  Some sort of locking ring, perhaps? But then, how does that work when you actually want to take the current bit or tool out of the chuck? Does this lock/ring then move to a third position when turned backwards by the outer barrel of the chuck moving in the unlock direction? But it can't do that in use from the forces of the motor and drilling or other operations? Even when the drill's clutch is properly used and it starts to click or slip?

                  What are the details of this mechanism? Does anyone know?
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                  You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                    I can understand why a slip clutch (the thing that clicks) would be built into a chuck. Most people tighten them with power and the clutch is always in the highest setting. So that can easily result in over-tightening with the finer thread used in keyless chucks. Severs over-tightening when the tightening torque runs up against that locked clutch. This, in turn, can result in difficulty in removing the bit or tool and possible damage to the chuck.

                    But I am super curious about that "one back click" thing. Yes, yes, you and the manufacturers say it completes the tightening, but just what does it actually do? Is there some kind of mechanism that actually locks when you do that? If so, it must be quite simple because there isn't much room inside those keyless chucks.

                    Some sort of locking ring, perhaps? But then, how does that work when you actually want to take the current bit or tool out of the chuck? Does this lock/ring then move to a third position when turned backwards by the outer barrel of the chuck moving in the unlock direction? But it can't do that in use from the forces of the motor and drilling or other operations? Even when the drill's clutch is properly used and it starts to click or slip?

                    What are the details of this mechanism? Does anyone know?
                    I believe it allows the chuck to be untightened more easily and has nothing to do with a locking mechanism. Some chucks after hard use will get 'locked up' and you can't get the thing to loosen without some mighty effort. I had one like that and I used to wrap the barrel with 3M grip tape so I could hold on to it and get it loose. I think the one click back stops this from happening. I always wear gloves on site so gripping the chuck was never a problem with the tape.

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                    • #40
                      I have to try that one click back procedure looks interesting. One problem I find annoying with the chucks is when they self loosen from the sudden braking when releasing the trigger fast. I have had drill bits fall right out of the chuck.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

                        I believe it allows the chuck to be untightened more easily and has nothing to do with a locking mechanism. Some chucks after hard use will get 'locked up' and you can't get the thing to loosen without some mighty effort. I had one like that and I used to wrap the barrel with 3M grip tape so I could hold on to it and get it loose. I think the one click back stops this from happening. I always wear gloves on site so gripping the chuck was never a problem with the tape.
                        This sounds logical, it would be hard to see how it could actually help with increasing the bite on the bit, so it might be a practice that helps with the chucks longevity so could be well worth using the technique on the chucks that are designed for it...

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Mike279 View Post
                          I have to try that one click back procedure looks interesting. One problem I find annoying with the chucks is when they self loosen from the sudden braking when releasing the trigger fast. I have had drill bits fall right out of the chuck.
                          Mike here's another video showing a Dewalt and a Milwaukee with the click back lock feature, I meant to include it previously, however it is here now.



                          I think it is important to remember that not all chucks feature this option, for example the Rohm chuck that MattiJ referenced to back in post #29 has a self tightening feature that self tightens the chuck proportional to cutting force assuring that drills don't slip. Rohm's catalogue has some good cutaway illustrations showing the internals of their various chucks for those that care to have a look.

                          https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j...zF7Tv9bhnGsah_
                          Last edited by Willy; 12-02-2021, 11:33 AM.
                          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                          Location: British Columbia

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                          • #43
                            Willy - it's very strange, My New DeWalt has very audible "micro clicks" just like in the guys vid and it does click backwards once and you can tell it's not for loosening - it clicks back into like a hold position,,, so really does match what the guys saying in the Vid YET -------------------------- here's a pic in the owners manual,

                            Not one word mentioned about what this guy is doing --- why? it's just tighten and loosen when your done...

                            Click image for larger version

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                            • #44
                              Looks like another manual written by lawyers and not someone that actually knows and uses tools. More concerned about liability than proper instructions.

                              Looks like the chuck matches the the description though, too bad DeWalt fumbled on a proper manual. Wouldn't be the first time someone screwed up a manual though, technical writers aren't invincible nor always aware of what they write.
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                              Location: British Columbia

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                              • #45
                                Here are the manual instructions for the Milwaukee, I see nothing about one click back on any of their chucks, is this just some internet BS? Also note we should all be removing the battery to change bits! Fat F**king Chance Bozo!😄

                                "Installing Bits Always remove the battery before inserting or removing bits. Select the proper style and size bit for the job. This tool is equipped with a spindle lock. The chuck can be tightened with one hand, creating higher grip strengths on the bit. 1. To open the chuck jaws, turn the sleeve in the counterclockwise direction. When using drill bits, allow the bit to strike the bottom of the chuck. Center the bit in the chuck jaws and lift it about 1/16" off of the bottom. When using screwdriver bits, insert the bit far enough for the chuck jaws to grip the hex of the bit. 2. To close the chuck jaws, turn the sleeve in the clockwise direction. The bit is secure when the chuck makes a ratcheting sound and the sleeve can not be rotated any further. 3. To remove the bit, turn the sleeve in the counter- clockwise direction. NOTE: A ratcheting sound may be heard when the chuck is opened or closed. This noise is part of the locking feature, and does not indicate a problem with the chuck’s operation."

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