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Wanna see what's inside a POS Milwaukee drill chuck?

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  • #61
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    I found a very good and detailed explanation of what is described by Bosch as an autolock feature that my particular drill came with on it's Rohm all metal chuck. Not sure of the exact model of chuck it has as I'm too busy at the moment to look it up.
    However the link below goes into great detail complete with lots of illustrations to help visualize the internal workings, so no need to dissect the internals of your own chucks. LOL
    I have not had time to do more than just have a cursory quick peek, I'll leave that for when I get back in the house as I'm up to my armpits in alligators at the shop at present.
    Hope this link is a good one to help shed light on this elusive "feature".

    I'm thinking this feature is found on a lot of chucks as it does seem to cross many flavors of drills.

    https://patents.google.com/patent/US7757374




    The patent you linked looks like there is a sleeve that moves axially back and forth to lock the chuck.
    I have one such keyless chuck, I think its B&D or Jacobs. First time I took it back to shop as I was unable to fiqure it out..
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #62
      Originally posted by Willy View Post
      I found a very good and detailed explanation of what is described by Bosch as an autolock feature that my particular drill came with on it's Rohm all metal chuck. Not sure of the exact model of chuck it has as I'm too busy at the moment to look it up.
      However the link below goes into great detail complete with lots of illustrations to help visualize the internal workings, so no need to dissect the internals of your own chucks. LOL
      I have not had time to do more than just have a cursory quick peek, I'll leave that for when I get back in the house as I'm up to my armpits in alligators at the shop at present.
      Hope this link is a good one to help shed light on this elusive "feature".

      I'm thinking this feature is found on a lot of chucks as it does seem to cross many flavors of drills.

      https://patents.google.com/patent/US7757374




      This link is nothing like the click back - the patent description is easy to figure out and something that we all can immediately relate to how their doing it but it's not a click back lock (if there is such a thing)

      The description in the patent is an for an "axial engagement sleeve" so that once you tighten the chuck you then slide a sleeve axial to lock it in, this would actually be a very simple device to implicate and also a device that would work very well along with being totally obvious to all drill users how to use it and what it's for --- I think it would make a great hammer drill feature as that's by far the most times iv had drill bits loosen while using ANY chuck system be it keyless or keyed,

      "A second type of locking feature that can be utilized is a manual locking feature. With this type of locking feature, a user is required to tighten the chuck onto the work piece and then manually lock the chuck sleeve via axial movement of the sleeve,"

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      • #63
        Oh crap --- MattiJ beat me too it and it's not by one minute either --- it's by 12 hours and 1 minute lol

        Good work Matt...

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        • #64
          Willy's video on post 31 is important to watch ---- I think this system is totally different than what's on my new and old DeWalt,,, That reverse click is very audible and solid, what I would have liked to see is him loosen the chuck after that and if there's at least one click after that, On my DeWalt there's nothing - it just loosens,,,

          Im a little perplexed as to why Makita would put out a video like that with ZERO talking,,, it does have written words but just does not seem right YET that drill chuck does speak for itself.

          That other vid of the guy saying "if your chuck clicks then it has a click back locking feature" Im not buying that --- I know for a fact that is not true...

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          • #65
            I have just one ratcheting chuck, it is on my old Dewalt XRP 18V cordless drill. It works exactly like you described and it has a distinctive back click, which has nothing to do with a drill removal. The chuck is 1.5-13 mm Jacobs XRP 700 series. It is all metal except the ring with markings at the very back and it has carbide inserts in the jaws. I have to admit - I never paid attention to that back click and never lost a grip of a drill bit. But it definitely serves some purpose, it would be nice to know what is it...

            Aside from cordless drills I also use a couple of keyless chucks on my mill. They are Jacobs JKP-100 (0-10 mm) and Italian Porta Validus (1/32-1/2"). These chucks look similar to each other, but very different from Jacobs XRP and they do not ratchet and do not make any back clicks. All 3 chucks are very good, they grip tight and with very little runout. This is in contrast with the chuck on the newer 20V Dewalt drill I checked at the store. It had a huge runout with my test pin and I would never buy such a drill.
            So why there is a difference in design between cordless drill chucks and regular keyless chucks? Anybody?

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            • #66
              Had an older brother call my bluff yesterday - we were talking on the phone and I told him how powerful the new DeWalt is, he's got about a 5 year old Milwaukee, told him I think the DeWalt would drag his drill sideways,,,

              he said no way so then I said I would take a 10mm allen and cut the small part off so it's just a straight shank and we could lock horns in forward low gear and then gun it,,, then said the DeWalt would turn his little motor into a generator and melt down his battery pack till there's nothing but a bunch of red and black goo dripping on his shoe's,,,

              As you would expect there was a brief moment of silence - then he said "bring it" and added he's not going to be responsible if in the act of countering all the torque he grabs the wrong area of his drill and engages the hammer mode...

              I can't counter with the same threat as mine is just a drill and yeah he already knew that, images of yellow and black fractured plastic along with a high RPM "free run" started dancing around in my head so I quickly changed the subject and then he laughed at me,,, this is what it's like in my family and this guy plays a mean game of chess so I should have had a few more ducks in a row before I confronted him...

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              • #67
                Well I am totally disgusted with Milwaukee right now after buying 3 tools for my job. The drill can't hold the bit no how, every bit is now chewed up. My 20 year old Dewalt and my newer Dewalt have no problem. The Dewalt has a 3 speed gear box and the ranges are great for heavy duty drilling. The Milwaukee impact driver sometimes works, and sometimes doesn't despite nearly no usage. The Miwaukee jig saw is way to fast for metal cutting and holding a constant speed is impossible. The shoe has a huge front cutout that makes trimming corners difficult. The Dewalt I just bought has a speed control knob and holds that speed, the shoe has a narrow front groove and the saw is a pleasure to use. I bought Milwaukee because my 3/8" 45 year old drill is still a wonderful tool, as is the same vintage Sawzall.

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                • #68
                  Yep, I had the same thing happen at my old job. The older, corded Milwaukee tools were great, the new cordless ones not so much. They *are* handy for service work in inconvenient situations, though. I'm contemplating buying the portable bandsaw and the extended-anvil impact gun next year, I'm told that I can get very favorable rates from our tool dealer. (the impact gun is ~$750 with two batteries)

                  Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
                  Well I am totally disgusted with Milwaukee right now after buying 3 tools for my job. The drill can't hold the bit no how, every bit is now chewed up. My 20 year old Dewalt and my newer Dewalt have no problem. The Dewalt has a 3 speed gear box and the ranges are great for heavy duty drilling. The Milwaukee impact driver sometimes works, and sometimes doesn't despite nearly no usage. The Miwaukee jig saw is way to fast for metal cutting and holding a constant speed is impossible. The shoe has a huge front cutout that makes trimming corners difficult. The Dewalt I just bought has a speed control knob and holds that speed, the shoe has a narrow front groove and the saw is a pleasure to use. I bought Milwaukee because my 3/8" 45 year old drill is still a wonderful tool, as is the same vintage Sawzall.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #69
                    Older corded Milwaukee (about 15 to 20years ago) were not perfect either. Had one at work shear off the chuck spindle inside the gearbox. Looked like a "spun friction butt weld" that failed.... no fracture, just two nearly if not totally flat surfaces. Chuck and part of the spindle fell out the front. It had a 1/2" drill chuck, was using the thing to drill a 1/4" hole in aluminum, IIRC. The drill had been in use a couple months, maybe.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #70
                      The only thing price comparable that Milwaukee had to my DeWalts in the sale was those drills and impacts that the battery's slipped into the handle,,, I can guarantee you my DeWalts would twist them things into a pretzel those things look like a joke to me.... fine for my grandpa but he's been dead for decades now...

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                      • #71
                        The new Bosh drills come with a brushless motor on a 18V lithium pack that has kick back protection. The older one would twist your wrist when using a 13mm drill. This one will stop the motor instantly. The clutch system when screw drive is selected will also stop the motor on the setting after 2 clicks. This only happens on the fwd motion. This is quite a nice feature as the screws will end up with the same torque. On the reverse motion, since normally you're unscrewing, it will carry on running.
                        What I don't know is what is the use of the optional Bluetooth capability. Just more things to go wrong, I suppose otherwise it's quite a nice machine.
                        Helder Ferreira
                        Setubal, Portugal

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
                          The new Bosh drills come with a brushless motor on a 18V lithium pack that has kick back protection. The older one would twist your wrist when using a 13mm drill. This one will stop the motor instantly. The clutch system when screw drive is selected will also stop the motor on the setting after 2 clicks. This only happens on the fwd motion. This is quite a nice feature as the screws will end up with the same torque. On the reverse motion, since normally you're unscrewing, it will carry on running.
                          that's indeed a nice touch --- if it does not cause any trouble

                          What I don't know is what is the use of the optional Bluetooth capability. Just more things to go wrong, I suppose otherwise it's quite a nice machine.
                          Agreed --- WTH is that for does anyone know? I really hate all this intervention of crap like this, on a drill? why?

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
                            Well I am totally disgusted with Milwaukee right now after buying 3 tools for my job. The drill can't hold the bit no how, every bit is now chewed up. .
                            So it seems I'm not the lone ranger irked by this unscheduled machining.

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                              that's indeed a nice touch --- if it does not cause any trouble

                              Agreed --- WTH is that for does anyone know? I really hate all this intervention of crap like this, on a drill? why?
                              So that they can justify their smart phones.
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                              Location: British Columbia

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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Willy View Post

                                So that they can justify their smart phones.
                                What's really sad is some day you might have to own a smart phone just to operate it, that's the way things are going,

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