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How to be a Machinist

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  • How to be a Machinist

    This forum branches out in all directions at all times. Makes for interesting mix of ideas and cultures, ways of being trained and at what levels of machining skills. Now..that is a GOOD thing. If you want diversity in ideas, why do some members act like they worship only a few members opinions. I don't know how you guys were trained. The whole point of having the pride of being a Machinist is learning everything you can. Seems some members only trust 3-4 members opinions and will agree with them no matter how far out in "left field they are. Let me ask you a question. In this line of endeavor or trade....how are you going to be your best if you follow only a few member's beliefs?? From what I have read, only a small percentage have actually had "Hand's On" several years experience, and there's nothing wrong with that, it's just that members may think that that was their trade. Very large difference between someone who talks as compared to people that actually live it, and that's what makes it fun! How would you rather live..worship a person who has never even seen you or your machines, or tell us about your own experiences? I'm an old fart who had the REAL machinists and Tool and Die makers scream in my face if I missed a hole diameter and location even by >001-.002. Learned alot, but also learned that there are NO experts in this ever-changing trade. SOOO, get in here and spill your guts. What are you waiting for..PEER aproval? Trust me, that will never happen. Just be yourself.. because you're gonna' have a hard time convincing me that you know what you're talking about. Just kidding, I would like to hear from all. So, over and out , and PLAY SAFE, Machinery has no Conscience!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Millman
    Just be yourself.. because you're gonna' have a hard time convincing me that you know what you're talking about.
    Very true, I have a hard time convincing myself I know what I'm talking about

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      I'm still trying to figure out what millman wants to know.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        It seams that I tend to follow the advice of a parson who has some verified experiance on the question & problem that i have. Some of the people on the form have shown their ability via.pictures ,answers to questions,general consideration of problems people have with machine questions ,Not smart A$$ replys. The bbs. should be a place to enjoy ,and communicate with people you have a connection with.
        snoopy

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Millman
          ...and PLAY SAFE, Machinery has no Conscience!
          This is my one gripe, if you will, with hobby machinists. They learn how to operate the machines, what each of the levers do, how hard you can push it before you break something, etc.

          But they don't learn anything about safety. These machines want to kill you. That's what they live for. It's the one accomplishment that will win them undying admiration and adoration from other machines... killing a human

          Please, guys... I've seen too many experienced machinists walking around sans important appendages
          Leigh
          The entire content of this post is copyright by, and is the sole property of, the author. No assignment
          of title nor right of publication shall ensue from presentation of this material on any computer site.

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          • #6
            One small correction."These machines want to kill you."

            Like my old man used to say(god bless him) "It's just a dumb piece of iron.It can't think. If you get hurt it'll be your fault. So keep your eyes open and pay attention."

            Funny how those words come back to you while you run for a band-aide.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Rustybolt
              "It's just a dumb piece of iron.It can't think.
              Nothing against your dad, but he hasn't met the machines that I've met
              Leigh
              The entire content of this post is copyright by, and is the sole property of, the author. No assignment
              of title nor right of publication shall ensue from presentation of this material on any computer site.

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              • #8
                I'm 47 and no professional machinist but have been making things with my hands - metal and otherwise - since I was a small child. I was fortunate to have a father and grandfather who let me use most any tool (except the table saw), so I was hammering nails when I was 6 and making silver jewelry by the time I was in middle school. I was making functional boomerangs when I was 10 or so - only because I got interested in it and wanted to build ones that worked. I did hobby gunsmithing in college for a few friends who were police or corrections officers then moved on to machine tools and blacksmithing in my 20's. I later worked in the injection molding business for 18 years and was exposed to real tool and die makers who worked to half thou tolerances all day long.

                Something I see in any trade or hobby are the "experts". These are typically people who have a small amount of info - correct or otherwise - who feel compelled to share it as gospel. Sometimes, these people suddenly become recognized by others who came to the party later than they did. For example, I know a fellow who was a jeweler by trade and started studying ornamental blacksmithing rather late in life. He saw a particular type of tool used at a demo by a nationally known artist and decided to buy one. A short time later, he was being paid to demo and stating in his presentation that he had set up hundreds of these tools in his career. Those of us who had previously known him were aware of the truth - but some of his students now walk around spouting nonsense about his credentials. That doesn't mean that his information or presentation is incorrect but a definite "spin" has been imparted to reality.

                A great deal of any trade or craft is common sense and basic mechanics but the major differences between the professional and the hobbyist are the daily repetition and tricks-of-the-trade. I can now use a table saw without asking permission but I can't set it up as fast or use it as efficiently as a professional carpenter.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Leigh
                  This is my one gripe, if you will, with hobby machinists. They learn how to operate the machines, what each of the levers do, how hard you can push it before you break something, etc.

                  But they don't learn anything about safety. These machines want to kill you. That's what they live for. It's the one accomplishment that will win them undying admiration and adoration from other machines... killing a human

                  Please, guys... I've seen too many experienced machinists walking around sans important appendages
                  I was always told to respect your equipment but if you are afraid of it then you clearly don't understand how to use it and shouldn't be using it.

                  Who is it that won't listen to you millman?
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Your Old Dog
                    I was always told to respect your equipment but if you are afraid of it then you clearly don't understand how to use it and shouldn't be using it.
                    A healthy respect for the ability of a 5 HP lathe to shred the operator does not constitute fear. It's a simple understanding of the laws of physics. I was not suggesting being afraid of anything. And I certainly do know how to use my tools.
                    Leigh
                    The entire content of this post is copyright by, and is the sole property of, the author. No assignment
                    of title nor right of publication shall ensue from presentation of this material on any computer site.

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                    • #11
                      All true, BUT...

                      The hobiest often sometimes or something has different needs and priorities. As a proffesional machinist I would use a CNC lathe, as a hobiest I might use a Myford. As a proffesional I would use a 18" chop saw, as a hobiest I use a horizontal bandsaw.

                      The point is that often hobiests will be content with a slower cheaper way. And often will be happy to make a machine rather than buy one, just cause they can. Even if it costs nearly the same as a second hand one, may not last as long, may not do as heavy a cuts, may take four times as long to setup and do to the same accuracy etc.

                      It may also be small enough to fit in the closet they have as a workshop, while the 36" lathe they can have for cartage costs won't.

                      So the proffesional working to 1/2 thou is very much worth listening to and appreciated, the "expert" advice is not always approriate.

                      I do have tool envy, I would like a large barn with a huge lathe, bridgeport etc but in the mean time...
                      Murphy was an optimist

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HWooldridge

                        Something I see in any trade or hobby are the "experts". These are typically people who have a small amount of info - correct or otherwise - who feel compelled to share it as gospel. Sometimes, these people suddenly become recognized by others who came to the party later than they did.
                        That's a very incendiary statement with some rather nasty implications.

                        Can you give us some examples FROM THIS FORUM where this has, in your estimation, happened?
                        Regards, Marv

                        Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                        http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                        Location: LA, CA, USA

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                        • #13
                          Well, I do know everything about one member here and that is me. What I know about him is he dont know JACK about machining or machine tools so steer clear of that jerky ..... JRouche
                          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                          • #14
                            Is this some kind of jealousy thing?
                            BTW....I just did a Google search "Forrest Addy" Pretty damn impressive!
                            Russ (I listen to almost anyone!)
                            I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                            • #15
                              Torker, did you find woodcenteral and the stories by Grandpa Augustus, they are kind of funny. They are writed by Forrest. Forrest seems to have a lot of tallent, wished that I had some of it.
                              Don\'t ask me to do a dam thing, I\'m retired.
                              http://home.earthlink.net/~kcprecision/

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