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Truck axles from old anchor chain.

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  • Truck axles from old anchor chain.

    I think I am addicted to these. Or maybe just hard working people.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VlG...zingTechnology

  • #2
    As I said before, its the use of scrap material that bothers me. I'm not sure that steel that makes good anchor chains necessarily makes good half shafts.

    Some years ago, a batch of reinforcing bar produced in that part of the world made its way into the uk. It didn't have any of the CARES quality marks on it, so big sites wouldn't touch it, but some smaller, less fussy ones did. It didn't like being bent at all and tended to crack, especially in hook ends. Turned out to have been rolled from worn out railway rail, so apart from being a totally unsuitable grade of steel, the rolling didn't eliminate the hidden cracks that old rail tends to have.
    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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    • #3
      Anyone else feel lucky for what they do to make a living --- WOW.... thanks for that, can't go wrong with being grateful...

      But I am amazed at the innovation and hard work, they are true craftsmen with what they do, incredible....

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      • #4
        When I changed one of my axes in my 2001 Ford I figured I would use parts of it for later projects. The splines where harden. Are all axes harden? or was I cutting it wrong?

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        • #5
          Yes, most axes are hardened otherwise they wouldn't keep an edge when splitting logs----.

          Now if you are talking about axles (half shafts), all the ones I ever tried to machine (back in the day when I only had HSS) were pretty tough going.
          'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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          • #6
            I sold numerous installations for induction hardening axle shafts. For automotive typically the splines are hardened perhaps .100 under the root. Then the other end gets the bearing area and into the base of the flange hardened. Everything else is soft.

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            • #7
              Interesting video... Did I miss something? They went from rough forging to drilling the axle flanges that were machined. Sometimes I watch videos in bed with my laptop and occasionally doze off.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
                As I said before, its the use of scrap material that bothers me. I'm not sure that steel that makes good anchor chains necessarily makes good half shafts.

                Some years ago, a batch of reinforcing bar produced in that part of the world made its way into the uk. It didn't have any of the CARES quality marks on it, so big sites wouldn't touch it, but some smaller, less fussy ones did. It didn't like being bent at all and tended to crack, especially in hook ends. Turned out to have been rolled from worn out railway rail, so apart from being a totally unsuitable grade of steel, the rolling didn't eliminate the hidden cracks that old rail tends to have.
                That's interesting, a New Jersey mill, Raritan River Steel, later Gerdau Ameristeel. made good rebar in Perth Amboy from old railroad rail for more than 30 years. Maybe the problem wasn't with the rail, but in the Indians running the mill.

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                • #9
                  Maybe someone remembered to anneal the material at some point in the process before final rolling. Or maybe it was melted and rolled from the new ingots.

                  Isn't rebar a kind of "minimum spec" sort of material?
                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #10
                    Enjoyable to see enterprising people working hard. I guess you really have to know what you are doing to work like that with those clothes and shoes.

                    Rebar comes in different grades. Grade 40, 60, 80, 100. The numbers indicate the yield strength. Grade 40 is 40 thousand psi etc.
                    Grade 40 bends easily and of course the higher grades are harder to bend. There is also ungraded rebar. I used to buy quite a bit of it (tons from the mill) for unimportant projects.

                    Those old anchor chains reminded me of when I was in Central America. The Mennonites were using them connected between a couple of bulldozers to clear the jungle for farming.
                    Last edited by Ridgerunner; 12-10-2021, 05:31 PM.

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                    • #11
                      I am pretty sure that's what hell looks like. Sitting there for an eternity, spinning that indexer.

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                      • #12
                        You didn't see any beer bellies on those workers. Can you imagine even working in our home shops dressed or should I say not dressed the way they are. No glasses, no ear protection, no steel toed shoes......this is a place where the workers take responsibility for their safety and don't lay it off on the employer. Not all bad if you ask me.
                        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                        • #13
                          Well, some of the things you mention are really just sensible to do/use.

                          There is virtually no amount of skill and care that prevents some random thing flying into your eye. Having that on a "well, just be careful" basis is pretty much BS.

                          No amount of care other than ear protection can affect going deaf from a high noise environment. That;s another place where "being careful" is a BS copout.

                          The steel toed shoes is a different issue. While "stuff happens", IMO the steel toe has really minimal protection in most cases. Stuff falling on the "instep" is not protected against, so in my considered opinion, it is the steel toed shoe that is the BS. "Fake protection", giving false confidence. Carry the protection further back, or don't bother.

                          Besides, having 20 lb of glowing white iron fall on your foot is gonna do damage to your foot or leg almost regardless.
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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                          • #14
                            When it comes to safety, I have to wonder if these people truly don’t know any better or just don’t care? I have worked at some jobs where I have provided my own PPE, no reason these workers couldn’t either.

                            I just watched one of these videos where they were making truck rims. The guy was tack welding rolled blanks together using his foot to hold it in place while he tacked it with the stick welder. Yes he was wearing sandals with his foot an inch or so from the weld area.

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                            • #15
                              Tac welding barefoot is just something they would get used to.

                              my pain tolerance is on that level in similar situations.

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