Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Truck axles from old anchor chain.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Yes, I am most definitely grateful for my job, and not having to do theirs for 10 hrs/day for $10.
    We'll see what the next 10 years brings.

    It's always been fascinating to me what you can do with a piece of steel once it gets hot enough.
    In this case, these good folks transform it within a couple of minutes from a chain link to a truck axle.
    I've seen blacksmiths take a bit of plain steel and turn it into a work of useful art with some fire and a hammer.

    If I didn't aspire to be a machinist, I'd love to be a blacksmith.
    SE MI, USA

    Comment


    • #17
      Those guys are working, and so they are eating. That's a powerful motivator. Jobs are not everywhere in many of the countries where that stuff is done. The Bangladeshi ship-breakers are is a much worse situation..
      CNC machines only go through the motions

      Comment


      • #18
        3rd world SLAVE LABOR
        _____________________________________________

        I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
        Oregon Coast

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by lugnut View Post
          3rd world SLAVE LABOR
          Little different than the mills in the USA of the 1800's, except channels like YouToob didn't exist to show the world the child labor, poor working conditions, etc.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

            Little different than the mills in the USA of the 1800's, except channels like YouToob didn't exist to show the world the child labor, poor working conditions, etc.
            At least the USA moved ahead from the 1800's, it's obvious where ever this video was from the country has not.
            _____________________________________________

            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
            Oregon Coast

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by lugnut View Post

              At least the USA moved ahead from the 1800's, it's obvious where ever this video was from the country has not.
              They need to start from an economy that can feed everyone, and employ the employable. That does not include everyplace on earth so far.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by lugnut View Post

                At least the USA moved ahead from the 1800's, it's obvious where ever this video was from the country has not.
                I don’t know for sure but I bet the working conditions in USA in the 1920s wasn’t much better.

                It will be interesting to see how far and how fast some of these countries advance.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Slave labor? I doubt it. They were working too productively for that. Slaves would have just done the minimum to get fed. But then, perhaps you weren't being literal.

                  It is unfortunate that many places in the world are like that. Those guys were making the best of a bad situation and my hat is off to them. Had I been born there, I would probably be one of them. It is the fault of the political leaders that keep those countries in such situations. And that's about as far as I will go with politics on this board.
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                  You will find that it has discrete steps.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    If this is what I had to do to feed my family, I would.

                    I can imagine worse.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Check out this crankshaft machining and balancing in a similar shop.


                      Cheers,
                      Jon

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I'm sure that low volume engine makers (not Ford or Chevvy) used very similar methods in the UK and US about 100 years ago. These guys are playing catch up.
                        Noticed their lathe tools all seemed to be brazed carbide tips, no replaceable tips in sight.
                        'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
                          I'm sure that low volume engine makers (not Ford or Chevvy) used very similar methods in the UK and US about 100 years ago. These guys are playing catch up.
                          Noticed their lathe tools all seemed to be brazed carbide tips, no replaceable tips in sight.
                          I would bet you were seeing it less than 100 years ago.

                          Those guys running the lathes in that video would really benefit from QCTP and a DRO.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            A QCTP, probably, but I'm not sure about a DRO. I can see nothing in their machinery and methods that isn't easily repairable by basic mechanics. The wizardry of a DRO might be a bit too much.

                            There was and probably still is, an export market from the UK to that part of the world for pre 1970s landrovers, and pre 1970s Cat dozers, simply because they are capable of being fixed in the field - sometimes literally in the field.
                            'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X