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  • #16
    Do a split bushing, but since it is old equipment, make a hammer key . It will look perfect !
    The Hammer key works differently than normal keys,
    Instead of restricting rotary location movement as normal keys do, it also loads the parts "vertically" ( when keyway is on top)
    This load stiffens the engagement and relieves rotary loads
    The hammer key should have a slight taper and wedge the top and bottom of the keyways which will lock in the shaft/wheel
    The Hammer key is also known as a Gib-head key by some because of the small taper

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/36/08...43fa8100e2.jpg

    Rich

    Edit
    The key is so tight , that a pry bar is used between the key head and the wheel to remove the components
    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 12-10-2021, 03:17 PM.
    Green Bay, WI

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Willy View Post
      I've used these in the past on gas engines to adapt the shaft to an oddball pulley. Never had any issues.
      It would be easy to make one.

      Click image for larger version

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      Now that is the way to do it. I've been doing this kind of work for a long time and I've never
      thought about making something like that. Neat idea, would have saved my bacon a couple
      times in the past. I'd consider making the slot just a bit shorter so you leave more material
      on the ends of the sleeve. And I would still consider making the sleeve with a shoulder on
      one end...
      Keith
      __________________________
      Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
        Do a split bushing, but since it is old equipment, make a hammer key . It will look perfect !
        ................................................

        Rich

        Edit
        The key is so tight , that a pry bar is used between the key head and the wheel to remove the components
        Pry bar, or dynamite..... some of those are so tight on old hit and miss engines that they refuse to come out at all. Had one on an old Columbian blacksmith vise (actually a double key) and thaat one fought pretty hard as well, but I did get that one out so I could re-adjust the vise position.

        DO NOT try hammering on the small end.... that will not go well for you.
        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • #19
          This is a heavy, large diameter gear compared to the shaft size. Different ball game than a 3” Zamack pulley.

          I don’t like the cutout sleeve here because it requires simultaneous install of sleeve and key.

          I’d prefer (if Taper-Loc is not possible) a sleeve with light press fit followed by a broach to split sleeve in place, then a tight fitting key, or even better, Rich’s gib-head key.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by oxford View Post
            If I was going to go with the split sleeve I would start out with a full sleeve and the cut key way out once it’s assembled.

            I would either Loctite (retaining compound) it in, TIG weld it in if gear material allows, or possibly silver solder it in place.
            X2, I completely agree with oxford. Solder or loctite a sleeve in place on the shaft, then cut the key through that.
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #21
              [QUOTE=Tobias-B;n1974018]

              silage pit

              I know those, most dont/ Funny, we used to play in the silage dump. Hey? I sorta survived, 45yers later. JR

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              • #22
                [QUOTE=JRouche;n1974094]
                Originally posted by Tobias-B View Post

                silage pit

                I know those, most dont/ Funny, we used to play in the silage dump. Hey? I sorta survived, 45yers later. JR
                I was riding my motorcycle in a 45 mph cross wind from college one day, and a local hog farmer inadvertently.... was blowing silage that day. Got a face full of it, open face helmet.
                A whole new meaning to "eating bugs"
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by SVS View Post
                  This is a heavy, large diameter gear compared to the shaft size. Different ball game than a 3” Zamack pulley.

                  I don’t like the cutout sleeve here because it requires simultaneous install of sleeve and key.

                  I’d prefer (if Taper-Loc is not possible) a sleeve with light press fit followed by a broach to split sleeve in place, then a tight fitting key, or even better, Rich’s gib-head key.
                  Buncha dang machinists here, not mechanics. Put the sleeve with the keyhole on the shaft, put the key into it, slide the gear on and lock it in place. This isn't a 10,000 rpm pump and it doesn't need the sleeve locktited.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

                    Buncha dang machinists here, not mechanics. Put the sleeve with the keyhole on the shaft, put the key into it, slide the gear on and lock it in place. This isn't a 10,000 rpm pump and it doesn't need the sleeve locktited.
                    When you cut the slot for the key the sleeve *will* spring open and then you won't be assembling anything. You have to think like a machinist sometimes -- that is why loctite the sleeve onto the shaft, so it can't spring.
                    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                      When you cut the slot for the key the sleeve *will* spring open and then you won't be assembling anything. You have to think like a machinist sometimes -- that is why loctite the sleeve onto the shaft, so it can't spring.
                      Done this exact thing many times when time was an issue, yeah it springs when you cut the slot, but you just “spring” it back into place when assembling everything back together, it can be a minor pain if you try and hold the split bushing to unnecessarily tight tolerances, but that is operator error/ignorance of whats needed. There are other better ways to do this already mentioned in this thread, but this way will work fine for this application imho.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

                        Buncha dang machinists here, not mechanics. Put the sleeve with the keyhole on the shaft, put the key into it, slide the gear on and lock it in place. This isn't a 10,000 rpm pump and it doesn't need the sleeve locktited.
                        You're on the right track--a lot of overthinking here. To make things a little easier I'd put the sleeve (with
                        a shoulder on it) and the key in the bore before assembling--that will keep the sleeve from springing and
                        the shoulder ensures that the shaft goes into the sleeve without pushing it out of the bore. No Loctite...
                        Keith
                        __________________________
                        Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by LKeithR View Post

                          You're on the right track--a lot of overthinking here. To make things a little easier I'd put the sleeve (with
                          a shoulder on it) and the key in the bore before assembling--that will keep the sleeve from springing and
                          the shoulder ensures that the shaft goes into the sleeve without pushing it out of the bore. No Loctite...
                          Ah, I see! putting the sleeve into the bore first, instead of on the shaft first. Yep, that is indeed a better idea.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • #28
                            I'm grateful for all the helpful responses here and need to apologize for not participating. Even though I subscribed to the thread and selected email notifications for new posts I'm not getting notified. Not in spam, trash, or inbox.
                            If I use a shouldered bushing, is there a need to make it large enough to install screws through the shoulder into the hub? Please stop me if I'm overthinking as I often do.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              probably overthinking. Does not sound like a really high stress usage, depending on pump pressure.

                              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                              I was riding my motorcycle in a 45 mph cross wind from college one day, and a local hog farmer inadvertently.... was blowing silage that day. Got a face full of it, open face helmet.
                              A whole new meaning to "eating bugs"
                              Not sure if you are talking "silage" there....... Silage ain't sewage.
                              CNC machines only go through the motions

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Spindle View Post
                                I'm grateful for all the helpful responses here and need to apologize for not participating. Even though I subscribed to the thread and selected email notifications for new posts I'm not getting notified. Not in spam, trash, or inbox.
                                If I use a shouldered bushing, is there a need to make it large enough to install screws through the shoulder into the hub? Please stop me if I'm overthinking as I often do.
                                You certainly could, if there was space for it, but a JT says "probably overthinking".

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