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Gear Hub Bushing?

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  • #31
    Silage is what goes into the cow.

    Poop is what comes out the other end,

    and then goes back onto fields to make more silage.

    You can't feed silage to non- ruminants,
    as it takes 4 stomachs to digest the... stuff... into the other... stuff.
    Giving off milk, burps, and pee as byproducts.

    t
    but I digress. Just a sheet metal shim would do the deal. On a farm.
    rusting in Seattle

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    • #32
      Let's keep in mind that the difference in sizes for this is 1 to 1.25". So the sleeve will have a 0.125 give or take wall thickness. And that means an added 0.125 to the key which no longer has a sharply defined shear plane. Instead if the bushing slips then the key will be spanning the slippage and will roll and make an absolute mess under load.

      I do like Willy's idea but for any thickness other than a small % of the key height I think we're looking at a high risk of things going badly. The key is going to see a lot of tipping and rolling force instead of simple shear.

      I'm thinking instead that for the high loads that this looks to be needing that the end of the shaft should be built up with weld then turned down and a new keyway to fit the gear. The gear is likely cast iron from the looks of the pictures. But typically the shafts are machined from steel so could be welded far more easily.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #33
        A hammer key would be better than a loose one for that case. And, going up a key size might help as well.
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        Hashim Khan

        Everything not impossible is compulsory

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        • #34
          Taking it all in my friends, also considering opening the hub, installing a plug and boring a fresh 1" hole w/ new key slot. Or possibly a different gear of larger diameter.

          This is a 2nd tier project I work on while awaiting parts for primary job of rebuilding a 1941 WLA 3 speed transmission. Greatest challenge for that one is getting reproduction parts that are actually usable. Running @ a 33% reject rate.
          Last edited by Spindle; 01-22-2022, 05:31 PM.

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          • #35
            Have you tried 45 Restoration Company?

            Have hard decent luck in the past with most of their parts although stock suppliers and quality is often subject to change I suppose.
            Also when shopping long distance you can't visually inspect the part, this can be an issue unless you can get quality level assurance before ordering.
            They offer a pretty comprehensive downloadable catalog.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #36
              Yes, I familiar with them from 20 years ago, real nice website. Seems like most of the distributors have a common source from India and quality inspection before shipping isn't part of the business model. I just had a situation where I abandoned supplier X due to quality problems, switched to supplier Y only to discover their source was supplier X when I had to return a part bought from Y & returned to X for refund. Then I discovered Samwel from the Netherlands produces superb parts and now buy only from their US distributors.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Tobias-B View Post
                Silage is what goes into the cow.

                Poop is what comes out the other end,

                and then goes back onto fields to make more silage.

                You can't feed silage to non- ruminants,
                as it takes 4 stomachs to digest the... stuff... into the other... stuff.
                Giving off milk, burps, and pee as byproducts.

                t
                but I digress. Just a sheet metal shim would do the deal. On a farm.
                Here in Germany a lot of horse people feed silage to horses. They are not ruminants. They do fine on it. I never did it myself as I don't like the smell of silage so my horses get hay. I have to qualify the silage statement. It is hay silage not corn silage.
                Last edited by Black Forest; 01-23-2022, 10:57 AM.
                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                • #38
                  From the Kentucky Equine Research website:


                  Question

                  On a recent horse-buying trip to Europe, I noticed that silage is frequently fed to horses. Is this the same feedstuff fed to cattle in the United States, and is it safe for horses? What’s the difference between silage and haylage?

                  Answer

                  Silage is chopped forage that retains its succulence through anaerobic fermentation. Silage usually contains grain plants such as corn. Haylage is also a fermented forage but typically does not include grain plants; it’s made entirely from grasses or legumes. In the United States, silage is more often fed to cattle than horses, as you have observed. Horses are fed hay in the United States because the weather is typically dry enough to allow for mass cultivation. In countries such as England or Netherlands, rainfall may preclude the production of hay, and alternative forages must be sought.
                  When preserved properly, silage is an acceptable feed for horses. Silage should be green or greenish-brown, be uniform in texture and moisture content, and have a pleasant smell. Due to the high moisture content, silage may be an excellent feed choice for horses with respiratory problems such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (heaves).
                  If the fermentation process goes amiss, however, mold and bacterial toxins may proliferate in silage. Moldy silage has been implicated in cases of colic and botulism.
                  Therefore, horse owners must carefully weigh the benefits of feeding silage against the potentially fatal side effects of spoiled silage. Because of these risks and the abundance of hay available, silage is not commonly fed to horses in the United States.


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