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  • #31
    Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
    Id wager that the reason some corroded while others didnt is metallurgical, with the non-corroded ones just being made of a steel with either a higher chromium or nickel content. Id expect a bearing made of 52100 to be more susceptible to corrosion than a 440c bearing
    Any chance these differences can be traced back to the manufacturer's source of supply. I wonder if the etched bearings were "sourced globally"

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    • #32
      Originally posted by tom_d View Post

      Any chance these differences can be traced back to the manufacturer's source of supply. I wonder if the etched bearings were "sourced globally"
      The bearings in question are old enough that it is unlikely that they were made in china (the meaning of "sourced globally" in most contexts). Not even made in east europe, etc. Obviously no idea where the steel came from, but again, old enough not to be in the recent system of sourcing from questionable sources and then believing the source specs and tests.

      It seems pretty clear in the case of the two in the picture, that the issue is electrolytic action, with the races and balls of one material and the ball cages of another which was not attacked in any way.

      In the end, it "don't matter".

      The point is that the use of Pine-Sol, despite a history apparently going back decades, is no longer a very good idea, if it ever was. Whoever suggested it may wish to reconsider
      Last edited by J Tiers; 12-13-2021, 01:05 AM.
      CNC machines only go through the motions

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      • #33
        If I want bearings really clean
        I use lacquer thinner.
        Does it get more simple than that
        or am I missing something ???
        I don't think lacquer is a death chemical
        but again, I could be wrong.

        -Doozer
        DZER

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        • #34
          Apparently it depends on how old your lacquer thinner is. Modern thinner is supposedly mostly acetone, older ones had much more interesting ingredients--
          'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Doozer View Post
            If I want bearings really clean
            I use lacquer thinner.
            Does it get more simple than that
            or am I missing something ???
            I don't think lacquer is a death chemical
            but again, I could be wrong.

            -Doozer
            Don't know, it depends on what was in there. I'm not sure there is a definite formula. Benzene and certain chlorinated hydrocarbons are not so good, although they sure work well. The ordinary mix of various solvents (leftovers, probably) is not bad, and it works for most things that are "oily" in nature.

            Does it get more simple? Well, maybe not.

            Solvents are either polar or oily (polar having to do with the separation of electric charges on the molecule). Which one works depends on what you want to dissolve. If the stuff is polar, water may work. Cleaning soaps have an "oily end" and a "polar" end, so the oily end grabs grease etc, while the polar end is attracted to water, which has a very polar molecule.

            Lacquer thinner is generally an oily solvent, so it "does" oil and unseparated grease. It does not seem to do very well with the "metallic soaps" when they have separated from grease and have been "just sitting" for a while..
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #36
              Lacquer thinner will not even touch human blood, but spit will.
              Mix lacquer thinner and alcohol and I think you might have something good.

              -D
              DZER

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              • #37
                Originally posted by tom_d View Post

                Any chance these differences can be traced back to the manufacturer's source of supply. I wonder if the etched bearings were "sourced globally"
                Sure, I suppose it's possible that somewhere along the supply chain a batch of 52100 bearings got swapped with a batch of 440c bearings, but before I jumped immediately to "crappy foreign construction", I would consider the fact that maybe a corrosion-resistant bearing just wasn't required for whatever those were pulled out of
                bearings are commonly made in a lot of different alloys, it's hardly a quality thing. Unless you need something to sorry resist corrosion, for something like a heating it's generally better to focus on other areas, like strength or hardness

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                  If I want bearings really clean
                  I use lacquer thinner.
                  Does it get more simple than that
                  or am I missing something ???
                  I don't think lacquer is a death chemical
                  but again, I could be wrong.

                  -Doozer
                  Lacquer thinners is great stuff
                  I just never had the money for it
                  I used to just get a jar full of gas out of the mower can
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #39
                    Well, I beg to differ. Movement ("vibrating around") implies velocity. The only way to have no velocity is to have no movement.

                    But I would tend to agree that it is a lot less violent in the ultrasonic bath than in most uses.

                    I was also wondering about the advisability of ultrasonic cleaning. I wonder what the bearing manufacturers say on this subject. And I would not be surprised if they had different advise for different types of bearings.



                    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                    Where is the impact ?? The balls are just vibrating around between the races. There's no velocity involved, both ball and race are of equal hardness. There is more force at the point contact of the ball and race when it's in the actual application. Unless there is some burning or arcing happening I can't see how it could cause any damage.

                    JL...................
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                    • #40
                      Look here: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...arings-199596/

                      Specifically at Forrest Addy's comments near the bottom of the page.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions

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                      • #41
                        Strange pine sol story. I've never tried it, but I know guys that have been using it for YEARS as a carb cleaning dip for bike and sled carbs and absolutely swear by it. I would have never guessed it could be detrimental to bearings.

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