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O.T. Tribute to Kodachrome

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  • O.T. Tribute to Kodachrome

    This music vid is worth watching --- it's a good way to start the morning,

    The song has been around for many a decade but It looks like this vid was put together as kinda a tribute to the companies film brand run from 1936 to 2009


    https://youtu.be/SExsuRIGAlg



  • #2
    Aah memories. I liked Verichrome Pro more than Kodachrome. Better blues and finer resolution.
    Don't miss it compared to digital though.

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    • #3
      I never used the Verichrome Pro mentioned by I make chips, but loved the warm tones of Kodachrome, only wished it would have been a faster speed. I would sometimes use Ektachrome 64, but
      didn't like its cold, blue hues.
      Sarge41

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      • #4
        I used to use Kodachrome 25 and 64, it had very different chemistry to all other colour reversal film, thats why it came process paid.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by sarge41 View Post
          I never used the Verichrome Pro mentioned by I make chips, but loved the warm tones of Kodachrome, only wished it would have been a faster speed. I would sometimes use Ektachrome 64, but
          didn't like its cold, blue hues.
          Sarge41
          Wasn't Verichrome black and white?
          Last edited by genea; 12-17-2021, 02:00 PM.

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          • #6
            Verichrome Professional was colour and it didn't have the muted yellowish tones of Kodachrome. It tended to be sharper with blues highlighted. It worked a treat for shooting weddings and it made the queen of the ball stand out. It's been so long but IIRC Ektachrome was a slide film. ? And yes Ektachrome was quite blue.
            Last edited by I make chips; 12-17-2021, 03:44 PM.

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            • #7
              I lived in Rochester NY most of my life, which is the home of Kodak. The majority of Kodak facilities are now empty fields. There is very little left of Kodak which was at one time the cities largest employer. Back in the eighties they made a statement that digital photography had it uses but would never replace film.....the rest is history.

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              • #8
                It's those damn pixels --- i told people along time ago they were gonna be trouble the smaller they got.... nobody listened to me...

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                • #9
                  One of the earliest digital slr cameras was Kodak, 2 models, one with Nikon and the other with Canon lens fitting.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by I make chips View Post
                    Verichrome Professional was colour and it didn't have the muted yellowish tones of Kodachrome. It tended to be sharper with blues highlighted. It worked a treat for shooting weddings and it made the queen of the ball stand out. It's been so long but IIRC Ektachrome was a slide film. ? And yes Ektachrome was quite blue.
                    After a half hour on the internet:

                    I can't find a single reference to Verichrome Professional or Verichrome Pro. I did find a data sheet for Verichrome Pan which was considered one of their professional films, but it was B+W.

                    Maybe I'm wrong in assuming it was a Kodak film? I assume Verichrome would have been a Kodak trademark, but maybe not.

                    I used Kodachrome for color until the late 50's when I started using Agfa films. Agfachrome? Agfachrome II? Slide film, but I don't remember the specific name. It's been a while. Colors were a little brighter and more saturated than Kodachrome and always seemed truer to the way I remembered the scene. I never liked Ektrachrome but occasionally used it for the speed.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by old mart View Post
                      One of the earliest digital slr cameras was Kodak, 2 models, one with Nikon and the other with Canon lens fitting.
                      They didn't just incorporate Nikon or Canon lens mounts. They were actual Nikon and Canon cameras with Kodak digital sensors plus appropriate digital controls and batteries in place of the film boxes with their mechanical controls.
                      Last edited by genea; 12-17-2021, 05:43 PM.

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                      • #12
                        VPS was a kodak film. I just threw out a couple unused rolls last year when I packed up my film camera stuff.

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                        • #13
                          I still have a freezer full of film. Maybe it will make a comeback lol. I have a room full of old camera equipment to. Nikon 600 f4, 300 2.8 a couple of f5's, etc etc. I sold most of the Hasselblad stuff.
                          If you want to warm the colors when doing E-6 processing, add a little sodium hydroxide. I used to have a couple of Wing-Lynch model 5 rotary processors but junked them when digital took off.

                          Click image for larger version  Name:	film 2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	147.5 KB ID:	1975282 Click image for larger version  Name:	film 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	130.2 KB ID:	1975283 Click image for larger version  Name:	Film control materials.jpg Views:	0 Size:	140.4 KB ID:	1975284 Click image for larger version  Name:	Film warming.jpg Views:	0 Size:	152.3 KB ID:	1975285

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by I make chips View Post
                            VPS was a kodak film. I just threw out a couple unused rolls last year when I packed up my film camera stuff.
                            "VPS" helps explain it then. VPS stood for Vericolor Professional, not Verichrome 🏳

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                            • #15
                              The only Kodak I used was X-ray film, mostly in one of thier own film processors, I remember standing in the dark taking sheets of film out of the black plastic envelopes and feeding the processor we used tens of thousands of sheets, even the chemicals were saved for silver recovery, a Walkman was my company at the time! Never tried colour film processing but plenty of black and white ( mostly ilford which they still make!) being able to develop, print etc got me a job at a racetrack of an evening developing 3600 ASA film for the photo finish ( stinky small shed on legs above the track ) Kodak certainly didn’t keep thier eye on the ball, don’t think the managers had any ability
                              mark

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