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  • #16
    I like the MLA stuff also. I have a Logan, so nearly nothing of his is of any use to me but they look like nice items. He is strictly Atlas / Southbend oriented, by his own statement to me. He said that some things "might" fit Logan, but didn't know.

    That is why I was puzzled. Thanks to a post above, I re-examined the drawings, and I see the hole in the toolholders that would work for a height screw, but when I read the article I didn't see any mention of the use for that hole, even when I went back looking for it. It isn't shown on the "general assembly" drawing.

    In any case, that disposes of a major WTF that I had when reading the article.

    I think a post that combined the fixed location AND the movability when needed would be good.

    As it happens, I would primarily WANT the fixed location and repeatability of position, so it is another "MLA" item I can't use...........
    Last edited by J Tiers; 05-17-2006, 09:52 PM.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #17
      Looks like it would be easy to add a fixed position with one simple additional part. Mount a pin in the t-nut, fit he nut so it doesn't rotate, and put one or more holes in the main body to fit over the pin. To change angles, loosen the handle, lift the body and rotate to the desire location.
      North Central Arkansas

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      • #18
        Not that simple....

        It would still slide around along the t-nut slot.

        You need to peg the body ON ONE SIDE OF THE SLOT to the base, and then make the bolt-down independent of the clamping.

        Or just buy an Aloris post......
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by J Tiers
          I like the MLA stuff also. I have a Logan, so nearly nothing of his is of any use to me but they look like nice items. He is strictly Atlas / Southbend oriented, by his own statement to me. He said that some things "might" fit Logan, but didn't know............
          It might do you well to take a look at the MLA site before passsing along misinformation.

          http://www.statecollegecentral.com/m...the/index.html

          Andy has 21 kits available that can be adapted to many machines. One of them is specifically for the Atlas lathe, but it can probably be modified to fit other machines as well. The Cross Slide kit, No S-4382 is made for the South Bend 9" & 10K, and may fit some Logan and other machines. There are dimensioned drawings provided so the buyer can determine the two kits' adaptability to other machines.

          Most of his kits are directed toward the 9"-12" size lathe which is common in many home shops. It would be impossible to produce items that would fit every machine ever made in this range, and it would be equally difficult for him to know if a given item would fit a given machine, but he has done a good job in accomodating many of them.

          Discounting the two cross slide kits that may or may not fit a given machine, 18 machine accessory kits remain that are of excellent quality and will produce useful accessories for the shop. The remaining kit is for the MLA diesel engine, which can be made on any machine.

          It would seem to me that twenty out of the twenty one items offered could be of use to you. That is not a bad average.
          Jim H.

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          • #20
            A friend of mine has made the T-slot cross slide for his 11" Logan.
            ----------
            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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            • #21
              Originally posted by J Tiers
              Not that simple....

              It would still slide around along the t-nut slot.

              You need to peg the body ON ONE SIDE OF THE SLOT to the base, and then make the bolt-down independent of the clamping.

              Or just buy an Aloris post......
              You're right, of course. Add a second simple part, a set screw in the t-nut to lock it in place.

              This tool post would be cheaper than a new Aloris, good experience for a novice, something to do if you like making stuff and don't have enough projects or just want to say you made it yourself.
              North Central Arkansas

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              • #22
                It might do you well to take a look at the MLA site before passsing along misinformation.

                JCH....

                Please do NOT make unjustified assumptions and statements..... you assume I was a D-S and didn't ask.

                Some years back, when I was looking at the MLA stuff, I actually ASKED Mr Lofquist about use with the Logan.

                His response on the crosslide was essentially that he didn't make it to fit Logan, it was for SB and Atlas, and that it might or might not fit the Logan, I was on my own if it didn't.

                I could not get sufficient dimensions to determine that from him. Since then, he has updated lots of things, and the info may be there, but I no longer need or want the milling stuff he has.

                SO IF I AM PASSING ALONG "MISINFORMATION", IT CAME FROM THE MAKER OF THE STUFF IN QUESTION. IF THERE IS A MORE RELIABLE SOURCE THAN THAT, PLEASE SHOW IT TO ME.

                possibly some of the toolposts would fit... although the center heights are wrong in some cases.

                BUT it looks like all the "milling on the lathe" stuff , which is what I wanted at the time, requires the crosslide as a pre-requisite. That is what they mount on. I would have had to buy the kit, not cheap, and probably have had someone else mill the dovetails, also not cheap.... lots of $$ to spend on something the manufacturer wasn't sure would work....

                The otehr items are not a whole lot of good without the thing they mount on, are they?

                On top of that, my Logan compound will NOT mount on the MLA crosslide.....which is made to fit the S-B style. So there was another incompatibility.

                Got any more to say about how stupid I am?
                Last edited by J Tiers; 05-18-2006, 04:18 PM.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by GRH
                  I built the one designed by John Stevenson and I really like it. A big advantage is I don't have to worry about needing extra holders as I can make them when required, I make a batch of 6 at a time and it's a lot less expensive than buying them. Another thing some manufacturers change stuff so your stuck.

                  Regards Graeme
                  I admire a man with remarkable taste
                  That design is quite an old one, drawing have the 1994 date on them but this was when they went onto the web,

                  http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/to.../toolpost.html

                  going by the text file and my sons age in the text the original one must have been built 1987/88

                  Now bear in mind this was before all the cheap imports, you may have had Alloris type posts in the US but all he had were the d.i.c.kson type. The one for the Myford with 3 holders was two weeks wages at that time here and out of my reach.

                  The reason mine is reversed is that I wanted the holders, of which you need plenty, to be easy to make and an internal dovetail wouldn't help this.
                  It doesn't matter how complex the post, you only need one but the holders have to be easy.

                  Having an old horizontal mill meant I could run a stick of these out using a 60 degree side and face cutter, turn them over, run back and I had a stick.
                  Once sawn off and the tool slot / hole put in it was then finished.

                  That post and the 14 or 16 odd holders have long been gone when the Myford was sold to make way for larger equipment.
                  Since then I have made three more posts to the same design but slightly larger and these sit on a 10", 12" and 14" lathes and by different stop hights they share the same 48 or so holders between them.

                  Was it worth the effort ? Yes I feel it was to get this number of holders between three machines. Since doing these I must have saved far more time that it took to make.

                  .
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                  Comment


                  • #24
                    "JCH....
                    SO IF I AM PASSING ALONG "MISINFORMATION", IT CAM FROM THE MAKER OF THE STUFF IN QUESTION. IF THERE IS A MORE RELIABLE SOURCE THAN THAT, PLEASE SHOW IT TO ME."

                    I posted a link to MLA website that clearly shows all of his products.

                    http://www.statecollegecentral.com/m...the/index.html

                    "BUT it looks like all the "milling on the lathe" stuff , which is what I wanted at the time, requires the crosslide as a pre-requisite. That is what they mount on.

                    Not a whole lot of good without the thing they mount on, are they?"

                    The accessories do require a flat cross slide for use. Simply because they do not make one to fit a particular lathe does not mean that someone cannot build one to fit the machine in question or modify the existing.

                    "On top of that, my Logan compound will NOT mount on the MLA crosslide.....which is made to fit the S-B style.

                    The Atlas style cross slide provides a T-slot cross slide that can be adapted to other machines. It will not accept the Atlas compound, but can be installed to use the milling attachments and several other accessories.

                    Got any more to say?"

                    I did not assume you were a D-S. I know that you are a very capable machinist.

                    I asked the same question of Andy, and the answer was essentially the same. But, he mentioned the castings and drawings are for the Atlas or South Bend machines, and you will have to modify the dimensions to suit your application. So, to that extent, you are on your own.

                    A reasonably clever person, armed with the drawings on the website and the dimensions from his lathe will be able to readily see if the castings can be used or not. I am sure they will fit many other machines, as SGW states, they will obviously fit some Logans, maybe not yours.

                    Many other machines already have the T-slot style cross slide and can use the attachments without the need to fabricate one.

                    Yes, modifications may be needed, or the mount of some of the accessories may neeed to be changed, or a spacer may be needed to raise a toolpost height, but the lathe tooling can be adapted to many lathes in this size range.

                    Andy's site includes many items that do not require the cross slides, and that can be used on other lathes, on milling machines and other machines or as stand alone projects. I can count 18 that have other applications, or are not lathe related at all.

                    When a blanket statement like his items are of use only on Atlas or South Bend lathes is made, it is very misleading, and might discourage some from looking at his product line.

                    Andy's products are well thought out, the castings are of excellent quality, instructions and drawings are well done and very clearly presented. Many useful items for the shop can be built from his kits, and they are highly recommended by any who have built them.
                    Jim H.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I would have to agree with Jim. Not to hi-jack the thread; but I have built the MLA boring head, and everything was as Jim stated.
                      I don't see the toolpost as being any different. It won't be suited to everyone; but in my case, I think it will do very nicely. The final product is, however, up to the builder.
                      Bottom line, I would say, is yes, if an Aloris suits you, that's what you need to get. I don't make money with my home shop, so I try to avoid that kind of investment. The MLA toolpost is already paid for and in my shop, just have to knock the scrap off the right piece of material, and there it is!

                      Kevin

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                      • #26
                        Well, we won't fight about it.....

                        My information apparently is old, quite possibly from 1999 or so, but it DID come from the MLA proprietor, giving it some credibility. And the Logan compound I have is an early two-t-nut type, not the "post and set-screw" type of later models, which may indeed fit.

                        Nice stuff though... IMO the retracting toolpost is perhaps the nicest MLA item due to its obvious uses for threading.
                        Last edited by J Tiers; 05-18-2006, 11:20 PM.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          MLA Toolpost

                          I have 2 square tool posts made from a 2-3/4 square blocks and one is for boring bars, I got so tired of messing with shims to get the tool on center so when I saw John's (oops I mean SIR John) design I took the time to make his,
                          I have (3) 60 deg dovetail cutters (1) matches my lathe saddle and cross slides ( st'd and a 11" long MLA casting of a boring table) another is for roughing C.I and the steel tool post and finally the other is for finishing the tool post parts.
                          The cutters cost around $26.00 from Enco.

                          Regards Graeme

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                          • #28
                            a nice design

                            I for one have eagerly waited to see Andy's article since playing with his toolpost at Cabin Fever. The washer or base will have to be thinned up a bit and the holders modified somewhat to work on the Emco V10, but it looks good. Toolposts are something of a problem on the V10 because you've got just less than .75 between the deck of the compound and the center height. KDK has a nice model but it's pretty pricey, the Phase II I'm using is enormous and needs the underside of the toolholders shaved down to work.
                            I have also tried the KRF but found it wanting in rigidity.
                            I'd also like to say that I think Andy's MLA designs are very nice for the older Emco family of lathes, now somewhat orphaned for parts and accessories.
                            I've personally found Andy to be of great help and inspiration even. A nicer guy there never was. It might be fun to build the toolpost and dress it up with that "bulls eye mixture" in Guy Lautard's books. Wonder if it would work...

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                            • #29
                              Bump...
                              Here ya go Jerry - all the way back from 13 years ago.
                              Still none the wiser re Aloris convincing vs 4 way........
                              Still not got your answers....

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