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VR-Wesson "VR 14" material?

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  • VR-Wesson "VR 14" material?

    Found a box of VR-Wesson cutting tool material, looks like tip material for brazed carbide etc. The parts are marked VR-14.

    The material looks dull, and is about as heavy/dense as carbide. It is mostly rectangular blocks about 8 x 12 x 6 mm. VR-Wesson makes/made carbide and "Tantung" (like stellite) tool material, and the Tantung has tungsten in it, which would make it of similar density as carbide.

    I looked on-line, and was unable to find any info about the VR-14 material grade, which is probably an old grade of whatever it is.

    So, is there a decent way to determine which it is? A carbide vs a stellite type material?
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

  • #2
    Stellite should be non-magnetic whereas carbide is weakly magnetic?
    Anyhow, based on limited peeking Valenite VC-13 should be similar
    https://books.google.fi/books?id=i5o...8QQ6AF6BAgKEAI

    more digging points to industry standard C13 wear grade
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #3
      That material was used for brazed carbide cutting tools. The carbide was brazed on to the shank (boring bar, lathe turning tool, etc.), then ground to shape and sharpness. There weren't any carbide inserts back then, and most of the carbide tools were negative rake for edge strength. Also, If you braze the carbide to something, you have to quench it while it's still hot, like any tool steel. If you just let it cool slowly, it will be too soft.

      Those original carbide tools had to be run fairly fast, to essentially heat up and soften the metal as it was getting cut. The leftover legacy of that is that now a lot of people still think any carbide tool has to be run at a zillion RPM just because it's carbide. But now we have nearly all positive rake micro grain carbide tools that can be run at any speed, just like HSS.
      Last edited by Toolguy; 12-19-2021, 10:41 AM.
      Kansas City area

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      • #4
        About what I fugured, due to the size. It's kinda thick for the usual brazed carbide tool, but for free it's not an issue.

        Too bad it's not Tantung..... They make a point of saying that Tantung does NOT need the speed, and can be run much slower.

        Still, I may find it useful. Not every tool has rake.

        Thanks for the info. Nothng on it found in a search
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think you have a nice cutting tool right? That is all it comes down to, in my humble opinion. Leave it at that. JR

          NOW!! I am a certain knowledge base when it come to these metals you look for : Movie ref. What you are looking for is non magnetic, and there for it will not "rust" red. It wont corrode at all.

          I have 50lbs of it. t 50lbs of Tantung G and Stellite, same chit. Tantung is better. looked like. Hahaha. The bucket is still here.

          I took the photo of all the bits. Then thought no. Thats jst bragging. I dont want to be that guy. JR

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