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Hendey 12x30 inspection, disassembly and cleaning

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  • Hendey 12x30 inspection, disassembly and cleaning

    Well It begins!
    Now that I have my Hendey safely in my garage its time to get after the project.
    My plan is to work on the headstock and gear cases first, then the drive clutch and possibly the motor. Then later to lift off the headstock to inspect the leadscrew reverse gearing and then the apron and saddle.

    I opened the drains for the headstock and spindle reservoirs and flushed them with mineral spirits. I used a modified battery powered transfer pump to wash out the headstock. This proved to be surprisingly effective and quite fast.

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    It took over 3 gal of mineral spirits to finally get the gear case clean. The spindles were easy as they only hold about a pint and are sperate from the headstock gears.
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    I filled the headstock and spindle reservoirs with ISO46 Hydraulic oil and ran the lathe for a few minutes to get everything lubricated. My next task was to flush out both the 3 speed and QCGB in the same manner as with the headstock. The Jacobs QCGB was really dirty and had a lot of swarf in the bottom of the case. The 3 speed gearbox next to it was relatively clean.

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  • #2
    Having done this several times you're off to a good start. Keep in mind there are several ways to do what you are doing so try not to get too distracted with well meaning advice. The important thing, and it's hard to do, is to keep moving forward. Solving one problem at a time.

    That being said it's generally prudent to survey the entire machine first just in case there's a big nasty waiting for you. I got nailed once because I didn't look closely enough at the tail stock quill. The 4MT was so bad I had to send it out to be reground which took nearly 3 months to get back. I'll be keeping an eye on this project, good luck.

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    • #3
      I have enough trouble distracting my self all the time!
      Thanks for the great advise.

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      • #4
        The next project is to remove clean and strip the paint off the rest of the rear covers surrounding the drive pully and clutch. This is a messy and time consuming job. All the covers came off without much trouble except for the drive clutch and pulley cover. I didn't realize that removing it with the drive shaft would dump all the gear case oil when it came off.😖 Thank goodness for shop towels and kitty litter.

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        In the pics you can see the pully drive clutch and in the back the brake disc. You can also see the large gaping hole in the rear of the gear case!
        I am now in the process of cleaning up all the drive clutch and brake parts and setting them aside. Next is removing all the gear train that's left on the back side of the headstock. I need to take a lot of pictures.
        Merry Christmas⛄

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        • #5
          Completely disassemble it, painstakingly strip all paint, clean and paint the parts then reassemble.

          Before you know it 5 years will have passed and you will have a working lathe that looks new.

          At this stage do not use it as a machine tool, it will become dirty, discolored and the paint so lovingly applied will be scratched.
          Leave it sit unused so that it may be admired in its glorious perfection.

          Buy another lathe for actual use.

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          • #6
            This may come as a shock but, some people have will have their car repainted and then use the car to go places and do things in. It’s really not any different with a machine tool.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bented View Post
              Completely disassemble it, painstakingly strip all paint, clean and paint the parts then reassemble.

              Before you know it 5 years will have passed and you will have a working lathe that looks new.

              At this stage do not use it as a machine tool, it will become dirty, discolored and the paint so lovingly applied will be scratched.
              Leave it sit unused so that it may be admired in its glorious perfection.

              Buy another lathe for actual use.
              Oh shut up.

              Yes we get it, your employer scraps old machines. We buy them. Often they require work to function properly again. It's not a matter of just making the paint nice. Chips and **** get jammed where they shouldn't due to time and careless use and they must be removed. Bearings go bad, lube lines stop up. The paint job is both to look pretty, and make it easy to clean. On my Sidney restoration (a truly lost cause) paint was the smallest and shortest part of the process by a mile. Yeah it comes off in use. So what? Time spent cleaning internal components and remachining was the most.

              You know this. You're just being a pain.
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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              • #8
                Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post



                You know this. You're just being a pain.
                Humor my friend, HUMOR

                Entertainment is lacking in the machine shop business.

                I know nothing about machine work in general, I simply know what works for me.
                The way that I do a job may be considered completely wrong by someone else.

                Chocolate or Vanilla ice cream?

                I suspect that my employer is contemplating purchasing a new 25 X 100" lathe.
                I hope that he doesn't do so before I die, I am getting to old for this [email protected]
                Last edited by Bented; 12-24-2021, 08:53 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                  Oh shut up.

                  Yes we get it, your employer scraps old machines. We buy them. Often they require work to function properly again. It's not a matter of just making the paint nice. .......................................
                  You know this. You're just being a pain.
                  Yes..................... that^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

                  What it actually involves, is fixing all the "quick repairs", and "we just need to get this job through so bodge it up somehow so it spins", that your employer did before he sold off the machine.
                  4357 2773 5150 9120 9135 8645 1007 1190 2133 9120 5942

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Everything not impossible is compulsory

                  "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bented View Post

                    Humor my friend, HUMOR
                    it ain't funny if you're the only one laughing. Trying to make someone look stupid doesn't make you look smart.

                    Two sayings that would be worth remembering next time you post

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bented View Post
                      Completely disassemble it, painstakingly strip all paint, clean and paint the parts then reassemble.

                      Before you know it 5 years will have passed and you will have a working lathe that looks new.

                      At this stage do not use it as a machine tool, it will become dirty, discolored and the paint so lovingly applied will be scratched.
                      Leave it sit unused so that it may be admired in its glorious perfection.

                      Buy another lathe for actual use.
                      Not necessarily. I'd settle for dismantle, clean, repair as necessary, reassemble, use. Its popular in old car circles, and called the 'oily rag treatment' - mechanically sound, coachwork rubbed over with oily rag to at least give a bit of shine, before jumping in and using it. As opposed to the Pebble Beach trailer queens.

                      The alternative to dismantle, clean, repair etc would be to buy a nice new import machine, and we all know what you think about that.
                      'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bented View Post
                        Completely disassemble it, painstakingly strip all paint, clean and paint the parts then reassemble.

                        Before you know it 5 years will have passed and you will have a working lathe that looks new.

                        At this stage do not use it as a machine tool, it will become dirty, discolored and the paint so lovingly applied will be scratched.
                        Leave it sit unused so that it may be admired in its glorious perfection.

                        Buy another lathe for actual use.
                        This is a complex and wonderful example of 20th century technology. Why not make sure its operationally good for the next 84 years. I understand patina but this machine has large chunks of it pealing off and as I have previously posted, I don't have any idea how this machine was treated and I'm certainly not going to just fire it up and run it. I have no problem having a clean machine, as they are easier to keep that way. All my shop machines are kept that way, I can't see leaving it with a pile of oily swarf piled up to the ways.
                        I plan to have this machine up and running by spring (4 months in ND), so its no big deal to wait as I have a lathe to use already. It just seems that way to people who don't care!
                        Last I checked this was a Home Shop Machinist community!

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                        • #13
                          Pulled off the rest of the gear train and sector arm to clean and inspect the area behind. Lots of swarf and grease, and I don't know why there is so much grease and none on the gears.

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                          I cleaned up the sector arm and all the gears. The gears look great for their age. I also pulled off the gear shift handles and cleaned them up. I'm also trying to keep many of the cleaned up parts as organized as I can as you never know when they are going to go back together.

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                          Haven't decided the next step yet. Maybe pull the motor and clean up the wiring of lift off the headstock and inspect the lead screw reversing gears and shaft?

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                          • #14
                            I had an easy time removing the taper pins on the lead screw, so I decided to pull off the QCGB as well as the lead screw and mounts. I also removed the auto stop rod, handles and mounts.

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                            Then off with the reverse rod and it mounts prior to lifting off the Headstock.

                            Next is lifting the headstock off and going through the leadscrew reverse mechanism.

                            Not sure that I will post my progress any more as there has been no participation or comments for my last two updates.

                            Maybe I posted this project on the wrong forum.😥

                            Skipd1

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                            • #15
                              I like seeing the pictures although I don’t have a whole lot added value to bring.

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