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Hendey 12x30 inspection, disassembly and cleaning

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  • #46
    Yes the real fun begins....NOT. Body filler and primer for some of the parts.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by skipd1 View Post
      Yes the real fun begins....NOT. Body filler and primer for some of the parts.
      Are you using an automotive filler like Bondo? Is there something better and less messy?

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      • #48
        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

        Are you using an automotive filler like Bondo? Is there something better and less messy?
        That’s what I have used in the past.

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        • #49
          When I first discovered the pneumatic needle scaler
          I was amazed at the labor savings when cleaning up
          old machines. In my mind, sand blasting is never an
          option, because grit is death to machine tools.
          I wear leather welding gloves and this allows me to
          grip the needles and squeeze them together and do
          things like direct their force into corner areas or
          gather them and lay them down at an angle, more
          like scraping like a putty knife. If you are careful,
          you can use the needles to scale off a flanking top
          layer of paint, and still preserve the bottom, well
          adhered layer. Putting some oil into your needle
          scaler air inlet every time you use it, both before
          and after goes a long way to making them last a
          long time. I know the trend is to go away from
          pneumatic tools in favor of battery powered drills
          and grinders and the like. But I don't know if
          anyone can make a battery powered replacement
          for a needle scaler. I will keep my beloved air
          compressor, thank you very much.

          --Doozer
          DZER

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Doozer View Post
            I know the trend is to go away from
            pneumatic tools in favor of battery powered drills
            and grinders and the like. But I don't know if
            anyone can make a battery powered replacement
            for a needle scaler. I will keep my beloved air
            compressor, thank you very much.

            --Doozer
            I think there is quite a few pneumatic tools in terms of use, power, and packaging that can’t be replaced with battery. At least not with the current technology.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Bented View Post
              Completely disassemble it, painstakingly strip all paint, clean and paint the parts then reassemble.

              Before you know it 5 years will have passed and you will have a working lathe that looks new.

              At this stage do not use it as a machine tool, it will become dirty, discolored and the paint so lovingly applied will be scratched.
              Leave it sit unused so that it may be admired in its glorious perfection.

              Buy another lathe for actual use.
              Remember....... paint stripper doesn't work anymore !

              JL..............

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              • #52
                Hopefully the next project is to reinstall the headstock and some of the gear train components that don't need to be painted. Once that is up more needle scaling and paint prep.
                Last edited by skipd1; 01-13-2022, 12:17 PM.

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                • #53
                  Finally getting some color on parts. 😀👍

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                  • #54
                    Awesome! Love the color. This thing is gonna look great.
                    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                      Awesome! Love the color. This thing is gonna look great.
                      Thanks

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                      • #56
                        Finally got the headstock back on the lathe. It went pretty well all in all. It was a little tricky to get the trip fork aligned with the dog clutch but now everything is connected and ready to go.

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                        Next project is to remove and clean up the motor and the motor housing under the headstock. There's lots of swarf and grunge down there.

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                        • #57
                          I jacked up the lathe higher off the floor to more easily slide the motor on to the lift table. Start cleaning it up a little tomorrow.

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                          Dosen't appear that anything in there is going to rust anytime soon.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                            Awesome! Love the color. This thing is gonna look great.
                            ditto! I love these threads

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                            • #59
                              I spent some time cleaning out the motor compartment and under the motor plate. The motor plate is on a hinge and it's a full 1 inch thick steel. They certainly don't make stuff like that anymore. I slid a large plastic tray under it to catch the swarf and grease mess. I used a margin trowel and lots of Naphtha sprayed to loosen the 84 years of oil and grease on the motor plate and base of the main casting.

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                              Next was cleaning and inspecting the motor and bearings. I have a friend who owns a motor rebuilding business and he recommended not pulling out the armature because of its age and the motor insulation used back in 1938 would be very fragile. I pulled off the outside bearing caps and cleaned out as much grease as I could and then repacked the bearings.

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                              Prior to this I tested and ran this motor for about an hour while testing the headstock and gear box and it ran extremely quiet and very smooth so I'm not too worried that this motor won't last. If it doesn't I have a new General Electric 3hp 3 phase TEFC I can run it with.

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                              So for now I'll reinstall the pulley and set it aside until I'm ready to start putting the lathe together.

                              Next project is to attempt to clean out the chip pan sump on the tail stock base casting. Who knows what's inside that!!!

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                              • #60
                                How many HP is the original motor?

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