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  • MC2100 DC motor controller

    I got a treadmill motor & its controller at the dump. The motor is probably the biggest I've scrounged; in size and rating: "3.8 CHP" (Continuous HP) ... yeah, right. On a 120v circuit that would be in excess of 25A.

    Anyhow, I also got its MC2100 controller. I know that as a treadmill motor it never output much power (let alone 3.8 HP) & the controller worked just fine. However I would like to repurpose the motor & controller, but I don't know what power the controller can supply. I've Googled & found many MC2100's for sale ($$$ on Amazon), none say its output power. There's many sites talking about repurposing it, again no power mentioned. No manufacturer data.

    Anybody know?

    I can always hook it up and see what load current it takes to trip its protection. But that's a hack. And assumes that it has overload protection.

    Thanks, Bob

  • #2
    I've seen them on treadmills with ~2hp continous duty motors, so I'd guess that'd be around the max, or thereabouts at least. Do you have a way of providing a speed/ PWM signal to the MC2100?

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    • #3
      Does it use a SCR for speed control? I have taken low power DC speed controls and increased their power just by installing a higher amperage SCR and heat sink along with a higher wattage resistor.

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      • #4
        Bob does the Motor shaft have a key way for pulley,I have a double shafted 3HP both 7/8” and keyed.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
          I've seen them on treadmills with ~2hp continous duty motors, so I'd guess that'd be around the max, or thereabouts at least. Do you have a way of providing a speed/ PWM signal to the MC2100?
          I found this PWM generator on a site dealing with repurposing the MC2100:

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot 2021-12-24 at 11-22-34 PWM Circuit for MC-2100 Motor Controller Board - PDF Free Download.jpg
Views:	305
Size:	11.5 KB
ID:	1976584

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mike72 View Post
            Does it use a SCR for speed control? I have taken low power DC speed controls and increased their power just by installing a higher amperage SCR and heat sink along with a higher wattage resistor.
            I'm pretty sure that it PWM's the output. Which is driven by a IRFP250 MOSFET. That MOSFET's specs give a max Ids as 20a (at 100C). So I'm probably OK - I can't imagine an application where I'd need more than 20A.

            But there is still the question of how much output its control circuitry will "order".

            Edit: there's also an SCR on the other side of the motor - a S4025L: 25A max. Also large enough for any use I might have of it.
            Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 12-24-2021, 10:58 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
              Bob does the Motor shaft have a key way for pulley,I have a double shafted 3HP both 7/8” and keyed.
              The flywheel/pulley has a SHCS - holding it on(?). Meaning that it's likely keyed. The other end has an external fan, so there is a shaft for that. But only 1/2", as near as I can tell.

              This is the motor: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FL9TWR3 Interestingly, the nameplate only gives HP & voltage. Not speed or current. I measured the speed at 130v to be 3600 rpm.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                I'm pretty sure that it PWM's the output. Which is driven by a IRFP250 MOSFET. That MOSFET's specs give a max Ids as 20a (at 100C). So I'm probably OK - I can't imagine an application where I'd need more than 20A.

                But there is still the question of how much output its control circuitry will "order".

                Edit: there's also an SCR on the other side of the motor - a S4025L: 25A max. Also large enough for any use I might have of it.
                A couple things.....

                The circuitry can "order" as much current as the mosfet will conduct.... The detail on that is that the mosfet, if too big, will slow down the rate of change of current and that may not allow full current if the pulse width is too low. At the probable frequency of these drives, I would not think it would be an issue, but it can be an issue if you want to "upgrade"..... You want a mosfet with a "gate charge" spec as similar as possible to the original. That is what determines how fast the mosfet can switch, which in turn affects how much it heats up.

                As a general rule, the mosfet is not used at it's maximum current. Usually there are details which limit current below the spec limit, which is likely to be a very optimistic maximum.... not a lie, but VERY dependent on exact conditions of use, usually pushing the case temperature to the limit, and assuming a rather "cold" heatsink, as in case held to 25C, with every other condition held at the most ideal value. Not realistic for actual usage. It gives useful info, which is why the spec is given at all.

                Some manufacturers have more useful versions of the spec, and those are much closer to being useful design points. Vishay gives 30A at the traditional Tc of 25C, and 19A at Tc = 100C, for instance.

                The pulsed current is also useful, as it shows what the bonding wire limit is. Vishay gives that as 120A.
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                • #9
                  Bob, send Maxheadroom a pm, he's designed a small plug and play pwm board for mc2100 drives that he sells for very reasonable money. I used an arduino instead as I wanted to learn how to, but for cost and convenience his is the way to go.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                    A couple things.....
                    Thanks - interesting stuff. You can tell from my post that I'm very naive about motor controllers. As such, I don't think that I would have actually changed the MOSFET, or anything else on the board. Unless I had very specific instructions in-hand. E.g., the PWM generator that I plan to use is specific to this board & adopted from a site dealing with this controller.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                      Bob, send Maxheadroom a pm, he's designed a small plug and play pwm board for mc2100 drives that he sells for very reasonable money. I used an arduino instead as I wanted to learn how to, but for cost and convenience his is the way to go.
                      Thanks. I'm too impatient - I have all the parts for that little generator & it's too simple to screw up.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
                        I got a treadmill motor & its controller at the dump. The motor is probably the biggest I've scrounged; in size and rating: "3.8 CHP" (Continuous HP) ... yeah, right. On a 120v circuit that would be in excess of 25A.

                        Anyhow, I also got its MC2100 controller. I know that as a treadmill motor it never output much power (let alone 3.8 HP) & the controller worked just fine. However I would like to repurpose the motor & controller, but I don't know what power the controller can supply. I've Googled & found many MC2100's for sale ($$$ on Amazon), none say its output power. There's many sites talking about repurposing it, again no power mentioned. No manufacturer data.

                        Anybody know?

                        I can always hook it up and see what load current it takes to trip its protection. But that's a hack. And assumes that it has overload protection.

                        Thanks, Bob
                        Bob this 3hp has rating as shown,Pulley&Fan keyed on 7/8” shaft and flywheel also keyed on opposite end. What does SHCS stand for?Click image for larger version  Name:	C23B8C29-BB83-4ED9-9B5D-A1E96F8EF567.png Views:	2 Size:	1.77 MB ID:	1976692 Click image for larger version  Name:	C3ACE926-13B4-41C4-A272-F9C69C76D2DA.png Views:	2 Size:	1.84 MB ID:	1976693
                        Last edited by Tundra Twin Track; 12-25-2021, 04:53 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                          I'm pretty sure that it PWM's the output. Which is driven by a IRFP250 MOSFET. That MOSFET's specs give a max Ids as 20a (at 100C). So I'm probably OK - I can't imagine an application where I'd need more than 20A.

                          Edit: there's also an SCR on the other side of the motor - a S4025L: 25A max. Also large enough for any use I might have of it.
                          The MC2100 has current monitoring and limiting via the processor, the SCR is used to ramp up the B+ DC voltage when the speed command is issued to the Mosfet, some models have a BJT.
                          Most applications do not require or recommend leaving the flywheel in place.
                          Last edited by MaxHeadRoom; 12-25-2021, 05:10 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post

                            Bob this 3hp has rating as shown,Pulley&Fan keyed on 7/8” shaft and flywheel also keyed on opposite end. What does SHCS stand for?
                            [snip]
                            SHCS - socket head cap screw. I pulled the screw, hoping that it retained the flywheel and it would slide off. A lot of tension with a gear puller, with shocks from a hammer, & it didn't budge. Must be threaded. Left hand, of course.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post

                              The MC2100 has current monitoring and limiting via the processor, ...

                              Most applications do not require or recommend leaving the flywheel in place.
                              Thanks - it's good to know that the controller will limit instead of going up in smoke. I'd like to get a torque-speed curve with a heavy load, just to see what kind of power the controller will deliver. 15A at 120v from the receptacle = 1800w = 2 or slightly more HP. Upper limit. I breadboarded the PWM generator & the controller does work. The controller seemed to be very sensitive to the carrier frequency (20Hz), do you know if that's so?

                              The flywheel is massive and would be very inconvenient to leave it in place. Getting it off may be a challenge.

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