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Air Compressor ID

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  • Air Compressor ID

    I acquired an old air compressor. Don't ask. Sometimes I just do dumb things. It is 2 1/2 bore x 2" stroke. The valves are leaking and I have not been able to repair them and I cannot find out who made the compressor so I cannot find replacement valves. I am not really understanding what is going on. I cannot get over 50 PSI and when I shut it off it leaks back through the intake port. Anyone identify this thing?


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  • #2
    Looks like an older quincy compressor. Should be and info tag on the front plate with the dip stick.

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    • #3
      Name tag is missing. Just a flat spot with two brass rivets. I will look at quincy. That is one that I did not look for.

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      • #4
        Looks like a cobbled together compressor system with a bad tank. (ALL used compressors have bad tanks, it seems to be natural law).

        What sort of valve does it have? Looks like it has poppet type valves, which you can maybe re-grind.
        4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

        CNC machines only go through the motions

        "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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        • #5
          It looks like it is probably a Quincy model 210. Looks like it is a boat anchor. Not worth the expense to rebuild it. Just did another test by putting air in the tank and there is a lot of leakage around the pistons into the crankcase. Between leaking valves and leaking pistons it is probably no wonder that I cannot get over 50 PSI. You are also correct that the tank leaks. I welded some patches on it so that it does not leak but I am sure that there are a bunch of holes about the break through.

          Thanks

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          • #6
            There should be a check valve where the pump output enters the tank.

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            • #7
              Quincy's generally do not have a check valve. The output valve is a flat steel disc that seats on the cast iron seat. Easy to machine the seat; the valve disc is simply flattened (by scrolling around on a piece of 220 though 600 grit paper on a flat surface; same for the removeable valve seat. There are a few different springs over the years. The inlet valve is the same, but may have an unloader diaphragm. All the parts are typically available, not expensive. Take apart the valves and post some pics.
              Last edited by lakeside53; 12-28-2021, 09:37 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GordonL View Post
                I welded some patches on it so that it does not leak but I am sure that there are a bunch of holes about the break through.

                Thanks
                That’s bad practice and you are probably lucky it only got to 50psi.

                Seriously, don’t mess around with old rusty, compromised compressor tanks. There is enough evidence on the internet of the aftermath they can cause when it blows.

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                • #9
                  Holes in the tank?

                  Drill another big one, and scrap it. Keep the pump, sounds like it is reasonably repairable.
                  4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                  CNC machines only go through the motions

                  "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Looks like a fairly small tank. Saw a suggestion recently where someone was going to use an old fire extinguisher as a pressure pot. They're rated much higher than the 7-9 bar of an air compressor and often available 2nd hand. Doubtless you'd have to make your own threaded fitting for the neck but I'm assuming that if you're here, that's less of an issue than it would be for most.

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                    • #11
                      At this point I have to decide if it is worth the time and expense. I paid $25 for the compressor without a motor. The tank leaks so I have to find another tank. A rebuild kit is about $100 if I am finding the correct information on the kit. I may be able to repair the valves but the rings are leaking so it needs new rings for sure. The motor I have put on there is not really right. It is a 1 1/2 HP but 3400 RPM. In order to get this thing in working shape I will probably have $200 in it. There are other similar used compressors on Craigslist and Facebook for that amount. It is more a matter of trying to fix it for the satisfaction than a way to get a cheap compressor.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GordonL View Post
                        At this point I have to decide if it is worth the time and expense. I paid $25 for the compressor without a motor. The tank leaks so I have to find another tank. A rebuild kit is about $100 if I am finding the correct information on the kit. I may be able to repair the valves but the rings are leaking so it needs new rings for sure. The motor I have put on there is not really right. It is a 1 1/2 HP but 3400 RPM. In order to get this thing in working shape I will probably have $200 in it. There are other similar used compressors on Craigslist and Facebook for that amount. It is more a matter of trying to fix it for the satisfaction than a way to get a cheap compressor.
                        The pump is worth saving, the tank is a bomb waiting to go off.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          I would think a decent Quincy pump, properly rebuilt, would be worth a couple hundred, depending on size / capacity. Add in a new tank and motor and you might have yourself a nice commercial / industrial duty compressor at the same cost as a homeowner / DIY grade compressor. But that's not factoring in the value of your time. If you like rebuilding it, it's probably worthwhile. If it's just another chore on a long list of chores... well go buy yourself a different compressor!

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                          • #14
                            I have a nasty habit of trying to fix things which do not work or work properly. I bought this compressor with the idea that I would get it running and keep it as a spare for my very similar 50 year old Saylor Beall. There are many things wrong with this compressor. Things are probably repairable but I am not sure that I want to spend the time and money to fix it. It needs a rebuild kit which costs about $100. It also needs a motor and a new tank. The problem is that once it is repaired I really do not need it. I guess that it is time to just get on with other things which are much more productive.

                            One thing which I found interesting is the price of things on Craigslist and Facebook marketplace. There are used 1/4 HP motors for $250 and other 1 HP motors for $50. In looking for a tank there are comparable complete compressors for $50 and compressors requiring a lot of work for $300. I don't spend a lot of time looking at these sites but it is interesting that there will be folks trying to sell stuff for far more than new retail. Why would someone pay $100 for a Harbor Freight item which can be purchased from Harbor Freight for $75?

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