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Semi-OT - slow blow 5x20 glass fuses with a bead instead of a wire

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  • Semi-OT - slow blow 5x20 glass fuses with a bead instead of a wire

    Needed a variety of 5x20 glass slow blow fuses for my pinball. Want Eaton's, but they only stock 5A at the big box store and there are no electronics stores left, at least until the last one I know of reopens in over a week.

    Bought the Amazon deluxe sketchy Chinese megapack and they're all a straight wire with a little bead of metal in the middle. I have /never/ seen a glass fuse with a lump of material instead of a wire or wires of controlled cross section.

    Has anybody seen this kind of fuse before? I don't trust them and guess I'll try popping one or two with my current controlled Sorensen psu before I send the whole lot back.
    -paul

  • #2
    One word says it, "Chinese".

    Mechanical parts are bad enough. Cheap steel, poor copies, sloppy manufacture, etc., etc., etc. But with electric and electronic parts there are just so many more ways they can go wrong. And most you will not even be able to see or even test for without destructive means. And a fuse is a SAFETY device. They are there to protect YOU.

    Chinese? They are not too concerned with safety in their laboratories.
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

    Comment


    • #3
      A picture would help, but I have seen fuses like that which worked fine. Are the fuses time delay, or fast blow?

      The "lump of metal" which you seem to think is the fuse, may actually be a thermal lag element, designed to soak up heat to provide a time delay before the wire portion melts as is usual with a fuse.
      CNC machines only go through the motions.

      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, I have seen these and they work fine. The bead adds mass to the wire which slows the heating of the wire and it melting/burning out. The rest of the thin wire allows the fuse to blow at lower short circuits. We have tons of this style of fuse at work.

        Click image for larger version

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        • #5
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          A picture would help, but I have seen fuses like that which worked fine. Are the fuses time delay, or fast blow?

          The "lump of metal" which you seem to think is the fuse, may actually be a thermal lag element, designed to soak up heat to provide a time delay before the wire portion melts as is usual with a fuse.
          Slow blow (time delay) as indicated in subject

          I'm gonna go buy some bussmann's
          -paul

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by psomero View Post

            Slow blow (time delay) as indicated in subject

            I'm gonna go buy some bussmann's
            Well, there you have it. A delay element.

            Now, I have nothing against Bussmann. or Littelfuse. They make good fuses, and they do exactly what the very complete specs say they will.

            Foreign fuses are often very different. US fuses are rated for the current that blows them, and the "must blow" current/time. Foreign fuses are rated for the current they can carry... Does not sound much different, but the result is that there is usualy NO OVERLAP in the ratings.

            Chinese fuses supposedly made to US standards, are questionable, if only that the usual deal of finding "the closest thing to it", and just relabeling those as a US rating may have happened. Kind of like the way some chinese lathes were made with crossfeeds that were labeled as US threads, but were actually just the nearest metric thread, relabeled with a new dial to read as if they were US.
            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by psomero View Post

              Slow blow (time delay) as indicated in subject

              I'm gonna go buy some bussmann's
              Just remember that Bussman fuses are NOT manufactured in the US. Main plants are in CHINA, Hungary and India. Just sayin.....
              Robin

              Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by rdfeil View Post

                Just remember that Bussman fuses are NOT manufactured in the US. Main plants are in CHINA, Hungary and India. Just sayin.....
                Qc and standards seem to be maintained OK. Littelfuse is my favorite, mostly because they tend to give even more info than Bussman.

                An often ignored and unknown spec is the "I^2T" rating. Littelfuse is very open about that, and their "Fuseology" booklet is an exceptional reference.
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                  Qc and standards seem to be maintained OK. Littelfuse is my favorite, mostly because they tend to give even more info than Bussman.

                  An often ignored and unknown spec is the "I^2T" rating. Littelfuse is very open about that, and their "Fuseology" booklet is an exceptional reference.
                  I agree Jerry. The point I was making is that China bashing is a sign of ignorance and misinformation. China CAN make quality products if paid to do so. They can also make junk on the cheap. You get what you pay for....sometimes 🤔.
                  Robin

                  Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rdfeil View Post

                    I agree Jerry. The point I was making is that China bashing is a sign of ignorance and misinformation. China CAN make quality products if paid to do so. They can also make junk on the cheap. You get what you pay for....sometimes 🤔.
                    Was really just adding to your comments, not disagreeing. And I agree 100% about getting what you pay for.

                    I should probably add that it is not "just" paying for better..... it is also in choosing the supplier to begin with. Some suppliers in china are schlocky by their very nature , and if you pay more, you only get more expensive schlock. That is true in the US, Germany , china, or wherever.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions.

                    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rdfeil View Post

                      Just remember that Bussman fuses are NOT manufactured in the US. Main plants are in CHINA, Hungary and India. Just sayin.....
                      So? Who the **** makes fuses in the US today? Probably nobody.
                      -paul

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by psomero View Post

                        So? Who the **** makes fuses in the US today? Probably nobody.
                        Unfortunately-----Bingo. Now in fairness, parts do NOT have to be made in America to be quality and reliable. Like Jerry said, quality control and manufacturer specifications mean a LOT!! Both Bussman and Littlefuse have high quality produces even with them being made overseas. I have NEVER had a Bussman or Littlefuse product fail out of specification. Every time one of those fuses failed it was either a valid protection failure or a human caused failure. Read one of those human failures as me loading a 120 volt circuit fused at 2 amps with a 500 watt soldering iron....Oops.
                        Robin

                        Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Professor Kelly at Weber University tested some automotive fuses from one of those all-inclusive kits from Harbor Freight and found them wanting. Badly! As in, they wouldn't blow at way more than their rating. Brand-name fuses tested out fine. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nELwmfAOz_I&t=93s Video is 34 minutes long.
                          Last edited by jdunmyer; 12-31-2021, 07:39 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One word says it, "Chinese".
                            And yet... they have successfully landed a spacecraft on the moon, so they are certainly capable of engineering and building functional, reliable electronics.
                            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jdunmyer View Post
                              Professor Kelly at Weber University tested some automotive fuses from one of those all-inclusive kits from Harbor Freight and found them wanting. Badly! As in, they wouldn't blow at way more than their rating. Brand-name fuses tested out fine. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nELwmfAOz_I&t=93s Video is 34 minutes long.
                              Expanding on the original spirit of the thread: what gets sold on Amazon by overseas vendors with obviously made up names (think slapping your elbows on the keyboard four times, garbo string of consonants with one or two vowels) is often the same junk you'd buy in a back alley and is not their best work output.

                              Having spent more than a decade engineering products that have been built both domestically and overseas using parts built and/or sourced from all over the world, I agree that quality products can be made in China.

                              The specific fuses I got were of absolute grade F quality. I'm going to test some and will take pictures. The ends are rusty on some of them.
                              -paul

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