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  • #16
    Nahhhh to see snap-on's stuff we would need to fire up a china video,,,

    oh and even though they are outsourcing guess what? their "lifetime tools" are not lifetime anymore - well, they were when I bought mine but they bailed on the commitment --- snap on sucks....

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    • #17
      No thanks.
      No 3rd world Paki garbage tools for me.
      Even worse than Horrible Fright CCC.

      Comment


      • #18
        I would take the "wrench" in the vid over most car lug tools --- they got nothing to counter the forces from having to have clearance for the handle - they just take off on like a 30 degree offset right from the hex, nothing you can put your hand on to counter the off-set like you could with the Pakistani tool,

        the results can very well be broken lugs or butchers hex drives... talk about crap tools they are the bottom of the barrel...

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        • #19
          Originally posted by I make chips View Post
          Love the guy at 12:00. Fills gloves then drains them on the floor. Brilliant!
          The glovers were an afterthought for the camera crew.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
            I would take the "wrench" in the vid over most car lug tools --- they got nothing to counter the forces from having to have clearance for the handle - they just take off on like a 30 degree offset right from the hex, nothing you can put your hand on to counter the off-set like you could with the Pakistani tool,

            the results can very well be broken lugs or butchers hex drives... talk about crap tools they are the bottom of the barrel...
            Ignoring the fact that you use an impact wrench daily?
            The lug wrench included with vehicle if for occasional (emergency) use only. How many car owner never change a flat because they call their auto road service and the lug wrench remains unused for the life of the vehicle?

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

              Ignoring the fact that you use an impact wrench daily?
              Wow quite the assumption there fella - try maybe once a week? And how do you think I use said impact on lugs anyways? I use it to take them off, I will use it to zip them up about half the time but that's just to get them snug,,, I use a hand operated 4 way for final tightening...

              The lug wrench included with vehicle if for occasional (emergency) use only. How many car owner never change a flat because they call their auto road service and the lug wrench remains unused for the life of the vehicle?
              Does not matter - it's there for a reason emergency or not - all's my statement was that the tool in the vid is superior to most that are supplied with cars - and im a master tech who designs and builds allot of his own shop tools so what you have to do with that is listen to what I stated and then try to learn the finer details of why I stated that, I wrote the finer details if your into learning - if not then quit making erroneous judgement calls...


              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                Wow quite the assumption there fella - try maybe once a week? And how do you think I use said impact on lugs anyways? I use it to take them off, I will use it to zip them up about half the time but that's just to get them snug,,, I use a hand operated 4 way for final tightening...



                Does not matter - it's there for a reason emergency or not - all's my statement was that the tool in the vid is superior to most that are supplied with cars - and im a master tech who designs and builds allot of his own shop tools so what you have to do with that is listen to what I stated and then try to learn the finer details of why I stated that, I wrote the finer details if your into learning - if not then quit making erroneous judgement calls...

                Okay.....
                When removing lug nuts, you use an impact wrench.....most mechanics will also use the impact to tighten them and torque to final spec. manually.
                Never said the factory tool was a good one, just seldom if ever used by many.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                  Okay.....
                  When removing lug nuts, you use an impact wrench.....most mechanics will also use the impact to tighten them and torque to final spec. manually.
                  Yet again that's confusing what you just wrote,,, but if you mean using the get-it gun to final tighten and call it good yeah that's wrong and keep in mind im "not most mechanics"

                  allot of tire shops use "torque sticks" --- they are a certain shank size extension that soak up the impact guns energy and converts it to a smoother more predictable torsion,,, they come in different shank sizes for different final torque ratings - they are not a perfect solution but much better than guys just using the gun and guessing - I do not own a set - I have no need for them and am never in that much of a hurry....
                  I also like to do things by hand because I get a great feel for the condition of the lugs threads - elasticity of all the materials in-between including soft aluminum rim seats or weak studs that are stretching....





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                  • #24
                    Snap-on, Mac, Matco, all those are over rated & over priced.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I think I saw this one before. Right at 4:00 into the video where the guy was on the drill press it looked like there was a severed hand laying on the floor behind the drill press.
                      Safety isn't much of a concern there.

                      JL...............

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        If you think about it, the wrench is too short to bend unless you put a cheater on it. With the squares at both ends, it is useful for shallow and deep reaches, but in neither case is it for really reefing on it. You would start with a longer wrench for that, look at the truck repair vids, where the bar is often about a metre long, with a guy really pulling on it. And, in many cases, that is with the bar bent over and welded into a socket.

                        Short wrenches have uses, and long wrenches have uses. With a short one, you are limiting the torque a user can put on the nut. That is useful.

                        Would they be better if hardened a bit? Possibly. But they would in any case not be made super hard, that would make them brittle. Most wrenches are of a hardness that reduces wear, but still allows them to bend, or be sheared off.

                        Basically, you have absolutely no idea what hardness the bar they have is at when they get it, or after the cold stretching/straightening process. So those complaining literally have no idea what they are talking about.

                        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                        ........................How many car owner never change a flat because they call their auto road service and the lug wrench remains unused for the life of the vehicle?
                        The supplied lug wrenches in my vehicles DO remain unused.


                        They are such crap that I use my own wrench and an impact socket (just the socket, not the wrench). I use the socket because I have split too many ordinary sockets on lug nuts with the hand wrench.

                        4357 2773 5150 9120 9135 8645 1007 1190 2133 9120 5942

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Everything not impossible is compulsory

                        "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                          No thanks.
                          No 3rd world Paki garbage tools for me.
                          Even worse than Horrible Fright CCC.
                          If you want "Made in USA" tools like I do, I can recommend Cornwell tools. Made in Ohio. We have one of their trucks show up at work every now and then, the guys like them. Reasonable terms, and they stand up to the abuse of a heavy equipment shop. https://www.cornwelltools.com/
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                            Basically, you have absolutely no idea what hardness the bar they have is at when they get it, or after the cold stretching/straightening process. So those complaining literally have no idea what they are talking about.

                            Here we go again - more expert analysis from JT


                            I would not go bagging on the guys that stated that, remember that machine that bent all the 90 degree's like it was silly putty and none of the bars "broke",,,

                            that's after the cold stretching and straightening process is it not? so maybe they were paying attention to that fact and you were not...

                            it's not very hard stuff, does not mean it still cannot do a mediocre job for what it's intended to do - but it's not very hard stuff in fact it's way below average hardness of a regular ordinary chrome van. socket.. put that "wrench" 1/4 the way into a socket and give it a good tug and it will "spiral cheese" right out of the socket itself and the square of the socket will be unscathed.... Just saying - it's not very hard stuff.
                            Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 01-02-2022, 01:17 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

                              Here we go again - more expert analysis from JT


                              ...............................
                              Since you obviously tested those parts so that you DO know what you are talking about, what was the hardness? What was the yield point of the material? How did that compare to the force a person could exert with the lever arm of the wrench?

                              If you cannot provide numbers, then you "expert analysis" of the parts has NO credibility.

                              I am at least saying that we do not know any parameters of the material, even from the "silly putty" bending (by a reasonably powerful machine that appears capable of at least several tons pressure).

                              4140 PH is bendable. Spring temper steel is bendable also. Proves nothing much.

                              You seem sure that it is soft trash. So naturally, you must have tested it. What did you come up with?
                              4357 2773 5150 9120 9135 8645 1007 1190 2133 9120 5942

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Everything not impossible is compulsory

                              "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                                If you think about it, the wrench is too short to bend unless you put a cheater on it. With the squares at both ends, it is useful for shallow and deep reaches, but in neither case is it for really reefing on it. You would start with a longer wrench for that, look at the truck repair vids, where the bar is often about a metre long, with a guy really pulling on it. And, in many cases, that is with the bar bent over and welded into a socket.

                                Short wrenches have uses, and long wrenches have uses. With a short one, you are limiting the torque a user can put on the nut. That is useful.

                                Would they be better if hardened a bit? Possibly. But they would in any case not be made super hard, that would make them brittle. Most wrenches are of a hardness that reduces wear, but still allows them to bend, or be sheared off.

                                Basically, you have absolutely no idea what hardness the bar they have is at when they get it, or after the cold stretching/straightening process. So those complaining literally have no idea what they are talking about.
                                There is plenty of that going around... How many heavy industrial or automotive shops have you worked in or spent time around? NONE of those guys use tools in a gentle manner like you describe. It just ain't happening. I've seen a 15" adjustable wrench snapped in half and plenty worse. And I don't care what minor work hardening changes take place from cold forming, that's no substitute for a proper heat treatment. Not only in terms of bending strength but also resistance to deformation when they're banged around and used with old worn out sockets and with pipe on the handle. I can guarantee you that nobody in a serious shop would use that thing as you describe. So much faster to just use an extension in hand or a speeder if you don't just use air tools. That tool is the kind of thing you find in the bottom of an old rusty bucket or abandoned in the bottom of a car trunk.
                                Last edited by eKretz; 01-02-2022, 02:04 PM.

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