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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    You keep saying that, but it does not look true.

    How many young kids 8 or 10 yo do you know who can fit a half dozen 3/4" wrenches in their hand? Yet the video clearly shows that being done, more than once. Nah, not more that a 3/8" drive, and if you look close, the rounded corners are the same as the "handle" diameter.... so about 7/16" for the handle.

    The 3/4" drive ones are longer, you can see them in the repair videos, 600 mm to a metre long.

    You can see ones just like the kids are making in those repair videos too. A lot shorter, they are, and they are not hanging on them.

    BTW, those guys do use both ends. The socket on the short end to snug up, the socket on the long end to spin down the nut or "bolt".
    You might be right, it's hard to judge, I went back and looked at the vid and it looks almost as if there's an intermediate size between the two (which we know that's not the case) so I went out to the garage and got a 3/8" and a 1/2" extension --- but the 3/8"looks way to small in my hand, I could grab a dozen at a time, and in fact did --- I actually only had 10 so added two 1/2" and got a whole dozen,

    I do wear a large to X-large glove size depending... so these people may have really small hands? lol I don't know because when i see the wrenches in their hands they do not look like 3/8" but have to admit a little shy of what i would think 1/2" would look like also....

    But even if they are it's still very close to 1/2" shank size and although that does work in the favor of bending it's still allot of compressional/tensile loading...

    I know any of my "Quality" 3/8" drive extensions would snap if put through that same process and with that much of an abrupt bend...



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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

    .................. those wrench/bars in the OP vid are close to 3/4" due to the fact that they are smaller half inch drive on the ends and they are being bent "on a dime"

    ................
    You keep saying that, but it does not look true.

    How many young kids 8 or 10 yo do you know who can fit a half dozen 3/4" wrenches in their hand? Yet the video clearly shows that being done, more than once. Nah, not more that a 3/8" drive, and if you look close, the rounded corners are the same as the "handle" diameter.... so about 7/16" for the handle.

    The 3/4" drive ones are longer, you can see them in the repair videos, 600 mm to a metre long.

    You can see ones just like the kids are making in those repair videos too. A lot shorter, they are, and they are not hanging on them.

    BTW, those guys do use both ends. The socket on the short end to snug up, the socket on the long end to spin down the nut or "bolt".

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    I thought you guys would have liked I rescued some 35 year old wrenches.

    They wont snap, I guarantee it. They will bend. Hell, Ill put it in my 50ton press. She wont snap though.

    Dont know where you got that from but it does not apply to these sticks. They are 30-40 year old Sears steel. It used to be a thing. JR
    How many old craftsman wrenches have you "modified" over the years?

    Iv always had to heat them red to get them to bend at an immediate angle, we also have to keep in mind the physics of bending, those wrench/bars in the OP vid are close to 3/4" due to the fact that they are smaller half inch drive on the ends and they are being bent "on a dime"

    so for comparison purposes yeah try bending the breaker bar at an abrupt angle seeing as though it's considered a "drive wrench" and close to the same size... you might want to wear some safety goggle's and get 911 on speed dial....

    That's what my original statement was all about --- it's the size of the material being bent on a dime,

    there is a huge difference in comparison to very flat wrenches, they do not go through nowhere near the tensile and compressional forces,

    You can take ultra hardened feeler gauge material and bend it on dime without it breaking due to it being so thin it's not up against barely any compressional/tensile variation loading...

    There are guys bending ultra long style very thin wrenches on U-boob with their bare hands --- some snap some don't, but it's not the same comparison - the wrenches are indeed way harder than the tool in the OP vid, they are just ultra thin and do not go through the same compressional/tensile loading,

    A more accurate demonstration would be to bend same wrench width wise at an abrupt angle to 90 degree's - again not going to happen without breaking because now your tensile and compressional loading is off the charts and catching up to the comparison of tool in the OP that bent like jello....

    One more honorable mention in the world of physics and metallurgy --- do all bending in the time frame of a millisecond...
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 01-07-2022, 11:07 AM.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

    Golly, throw me under the bus thanks JR


    take any of JR's wrenches or breaker bars and try that and they will never get past 30 or 45 degree's without snapping - I know this because iv been in the biz for about 4.5 decades and have had to bend and make my own custom wrenches many times - and even the dirt cheap ones will not do it without heat, you have to heat them red and bend, if you don't you will simply break the wrench --- when I say dirt cheap i mean HF pittsburgh but they are still heat treated chrome vanadium....
    I thought you guys would have liked I rescued some 35 year old wrenches.

    They wont snap, I guarantee it. They will bend. Hell, Ill put it in my 50ton press. She wont snap though.

    Dont know where you got that from but it does not apply to these sticks. They are 30-40 year old Sears steel. It used to be a thing. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by NiftyNev View Post

    Where's the cushion from?
    Old azzed couch. We bought from lazy boy 20 years ago. Does it show? My bust JR

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post

    When I was teaching the HVAC Program, I loved to see farm kids come in. I was raised on a small farm and I knew what they had learned. They were the best students and when done they got the better jobs and always excelled. Modern kids today, its video games, computer play and sleeping in, usually in mommies basement!
    Yes they learn responsibility very early on in life. Our daughter has had her own business since she was 10 years old. Actually two. A pony business and a forest business. She has enough money in the bank that she could easily buy a home outright. Now I did give her a boost so she didn't start with nothing but she actually paid every penny back that was invested by me. She has had employees since she was 10. She manages a section of forest completely on her own. She has been able to whip up a spreadsheet since she was 11. She charts everything to do with the maintenance of all the equipment used in both businesses. I had hoped she would be more entrepreneurial but she opted for a more sedate life. But she is happy and that is what counts.

    Leave a comment:


  • wmgeorge
    replied
    Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post



    Good for her BF,not downplaying or bashing the kids from urban background,but a lot of rural kids see and experience a pretty vast assortment of tasks some at a very young age.I’m sure the urban kids have more street smarts and other things,just different depending on the environment they grew up in.
    When I was teaching the HVAC Program, I loved to see farm kids come in. I was raised on a small farm and I knew what they had learned. They were the best students and when done they got the better jobs and always excelled. Modern kids today, its video games, computer play and sleeping in, usually in mommies basement!

    Leave a comment:


  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post

    Our daughter has started her education at the justice department. She was selected over 100's of applicants. The interview process was excruciating. We found out after she was offered the position and had been there about a month that the head of the department was shocked at how many skills she has that most people never master let alone a teenager. Life on a horse farm has prepared her well.


    Good for her BF,not downplaying or bashing the kids from urban background,but a lot of rural kids see and experience a pretty vast assortment of tasks some at a very young age.I’m sure the urban kids have more street smarts and other things,just different depending on the environment they grew up in.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

    Toyota and its subsidiaries are a Japanese owned company. That means the vast amount of profit and growth goes to another country not ours.
    Yah think? That's obvious. However, the factories employ locals, which is the original point.

    If you think for even a moment that profits from American "multinational" companies stay in the US, you better think again. They rush that money out of the US before you can see it whiz by. Apple, for instance, does that. So do most others.

    That's what happens with "multinational" companies. Toyota is one of those, by the way. They have no allegiance to any country. They arrange to "receive" the profits in whatever country has the lowest taxes, or no taxes. That's why those island countries in the Caribbean are "home" to many companies.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 01-05-2022, 10:40 AM.

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  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    Many of those cars were at least assembled here, unlike most of what you find in a Walmart. A lot of "foreign" cars are assembled here. It makes more sense than the shipping at the volumes needed. Toyota has 4 factories in the US. You can look it up.
    Toyota and its subsidiaries are a Japanese owned company. That means the vast amount of profit and growth goes to another country not ours.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    I actually thought Yodertoy had that claim more than a decade ago but must have been world wide leader...

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

    I think you might be fighting a losing battle, a righteous one but still losing. Toyota becomes US largest carmaker.

    "For the first time in nearly 100 years, Toyota sold more vehicles in a year in America than General Motors or any other car company, based on a report of year-end 2021 sales released Tuesday."
    Many of those cars were at least assembled here, unlike most of what you find in a Walmart. A lot of "foreign" cars are assembled here. It makes more sense than the shipping at the volumes needed. Toyota has 4 factories in the US. You can look it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    Glad I'm not the only one who remembers. Though FWIW Mexico had just as much as China to do with it, if you drive one of the "Big Three" cars then major sub-assemblies were made in Mexico. As well as India, the Philippines, etc etc etc. I am convinced that the whole globalization/"free trade" thing was intended to break the back of American labor, as well as American consumers. Since they tend to be one and the same. This is why I *refuse* to buy new tools that are made offshore. Ditto for new clothing. I refuse to shop the "big box" stores of which you mentioned one of them.... Having family whose pensions were looted by the big bosses shortly before their jobs miraculously re-appeared in a different country...
    I think you might be fighting a losing battle, a righteous one but still losing. Toyota becomes US largest carmaker.

    "For the first time in nearly 100 years, Toyota sold more vehicles in a year in America than General Motors or any other car company, based on a report of year-end 2021 sales released Tuesday."

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    So you think...... but actually not.

    The end came with the huge sucking sound from china. It sucked the life out south of the border as much or more than it did here. And in europe also. Thanks to Walmart.
    Glad I'm not the only one who remembers. Though FWIW Mexico had just as much as China to do with it, if you drive one of the "Big Three" cars then major sub-assemblies were made in Mexico. As well as India, the Philippines, etc etc etc. I am convinced that the whole globalization/"free trade" thing was intended to break the back of American labor, as well as American consumers. Since they tend to be one and the same. This is why I *refuse* to buy new tools that are made offshore. Ditto for new clothing. I refuse to shop the "big box" stores of which you mentioned one of them.... Having family whose pensions were looted by the big bosses shortly before their jobs miraculously re-appeared in a different country...

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post


    A lot of Companies would hire Farm or Rural Kids just for the fact they’ve been exposed to broader tasks that Urban Kids had no connection with growing up.
    Our daughter has started her education at the justice department. She was selected over 100's of applicants. The interview process was excruciating. We found out after she was offered the position and had been there about a month that the head of the department was shocked at how many skills she has that most people never master let alone a teenager. Life on a horse farm has prepared her well.

    Leave a comment:

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