Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

More quality tools from our hard working friends in Pakistan!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    Geeze can't you guys just enjoy a video of a bunch of hard working men using old tools making a living creating a useful tool in their country? Maybe youze need a hobby?

    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
      Crikey, 3 pages of useless arguments about heat treatment and survivability in industrial environment and nobody bothered to think of the obvious point

      Whos delusional enough to think that these are meant for lifetime use in an industrial environment?

      Jesus guys, theyre cheap wrenches, odds are theyre going to live most of their lives in the boot of someones car next to the useless scissor jack. They dont need to be heat treated, and for the few dollars a pop theyre going to be sold for they arent going to be. ....................
      Very good. Exactly the point. At least ONE person "gets it".

      Not to mention that a 3/8" wrench with a pretty short handle is not going to get much force applied. No little kid like those is going to grab a handful of 6 or so 3/4" drive wrenches, so they aren't that..

      It's a DOUBLE_ENDED wrench..... that already screams "consumer use" because no mechanic wants a square on the handle end of the wrench, he wants a nice smooth handle. Anyone who actually USES socket wrenches would instantly see that.

      CNC machines only go through the motions

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
        Crikey, 3 pages of useless arguments about heat treatment and survivability in industrial environment and nobody bothered to think of the obvious point

        Whos delusional enough to think that these are meant for lifetime use in an industrial environment?

        Jesus guys, theyre cheap wrenches, odds are theyre going to live most of their lives in the boot of someones car next to the useless scissor jack. They dont need to be heat treated, and for the few dollars a pop theyre going to be sold for they arent going to be. Who cares
        Exactly --- again what do you want for the money?, but good verification from you that it's not heat treated, the trouble started when it was important to some - who knows maybe they do plan on putting a cheater bar to everything so they just don't won't buy it if it's soft, their observation was correct - but then someone chimed in saying they had no way of telling...

        so that's where the whole thing derailed - this is a forum that deals with processes with metals including hardening and strength --- and to see a 3/4" bar bending a direct 90 degree angle immediately tells you that the material is not hardened,

        take any of JR's wrenches or breaker bars and try that and they will never get past 30 or 45 degree's without snapping - I know this because iv been in the biz for about 4.5 decades and have had to bend and make my own custom wrenches many times - and even the dirt cheap ones will not do it without heat, you have to heat them red and bend, if you don't you will simply break the wrench --- when I say dirt cheap i mean HF pittsburgh but they are still heat treated chrome vanadium....

        Like so many things people get caught up on technicalities --- so all's it's really about is setting the record straight so we can then move on and talk about the rubber gloves and what kind they were or if the kid was skipping school that day to work....

        it's just good that everyone now agree's so we can move on...

        Comment


        • #79
          ...yeah, I wasnt agreeing with you boomer, if anything I think you started a completely pointless fight

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
            ...yeah, I wasnt agreeing with you boomer, if anything I think you started a completely pointless fight
            Oh my bad --- I guess I mistook "their cheap wrenches they don't need to be heat treated" the wrong way lol

            thats ok - plenty of others sacking up...

            It's never a pointless fight if your teaching others what the truth is...

            Comment


            • #81
              No Child labor? Did you watch the video, missed one 8 year old sitting in the corner fishing wrenches out of the sand pile or the kids dipping parts in chemicals without gloves? Sure they furnished some with rubber gloves to make it look good for the video.
              Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

              Comment


              • #82
                Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
                No Child labor? Did you watch the video, missed one 8 year old sitting in the corner fishing wrenches out of the sand pile or the kids dipping parts in chemicals without gloves? Sure they furnished some with rubber gloves to make it look good for the video.
                Dunno how old, but 8 is a good guess for the one working to dry off wrenches in the sand (or whatever he was doing).. Maybe younger, he did not look very concentrated on the task.

                The child labor is how I decided that those are more likely 3/8" and not 3/4" wrenches.... how many kids can grab a half dozen 3/4" bars in their hand? Not too many
                CNC machines only go through the motions

                Comment


                • #83
                  Who know's --- if we really knew what the scoop was the kid could be very fortunate and actually be in a safe haven working there...

                  Not saying its "a great thing"...

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    This debate or arguing happens all the time with every subject under the sun, nothing new. There are plenty of people who can't accept an opinion contrary to their own, they're in no short supply. I don't have a problem with guys admiring a little hard work, I was just saying these tools are not high quality items. But I digress. And yeah, not admiring the child labor which is probably poisoning the poor children.

                    And no Richard, I'm not a bricklayer. But I have done some brick laying. I don't beat on my trowel trying to break bricks in half like a savage, so no, the trowel really does not need to be very strong. It is lifting, applying and smoothing mortar, as it was intended to do. Which does not require a lot of strength, as I already noted.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Originally posted by eKretz View Post
                      This debate or arguing happens all the time with every subject under the sun, nothing new. There are plenty of people who can't accept an opinion contrary to their own, they're in no short supply. I don't have a problem with guys admiring a little hard work, I was just saying these tools are not high quality items. But I digress. And yeah, not admiring the child labor which is probably poisoning the poor children.

                      And no Richard, I'm not a bricklayer. But I have done some brick laying. I don't beat on my trowel trying to break bricks in half like a savage, so no, the trowel really does not need to be very strong. It is lifting, applying and smoothing mortar, as it was intended to do. Which does not require a lot of strength, as I already noted.
                      Sorry, professional bricklayers cut bricks with the edge of the trowel, so it does need to to strong. A couple of well directed hits and the brick is in 2. Far faster than going over to the brick saw, and no dust.
                      'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post

                        Sorry, professional bricklayers cut bricks with the edge of the trowel, so it does need to to strong. A couple of well directed hits and the brick is in 2. Far faster than going over to the brick saw, and no dust.
                        The same hits work from a brick chisel. Which is intended to split bricks... But again, you use your tools the way you'd like. I have no problem with that. You begin to understand where the arguments and debate come from, eh? The people who have a problem with difference of opinion and leave no room for compromise.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post

                          Sorry, professional bricklayers cut bricks with the edge of the trowel, so it does need to to strong. A couple of well directed hits and the brick is in 2. Far faster than going over to the brick saw, and no dust.
                          This thread has reached critical mass and I'm being sucked in!

                          After skimming 3 pages of ridiculousness, it seems the disagreement comes down to the intended use of the tools. In your example, a professional brick layer absolutely needs a strong trowel and will use it to break bricks. That's the right way to do it if you're a pro - it's far more efficient than cutting bricks with a saw or even pulling out a chisel. You get into a rhythm and can be extremely effective with no "tool changes", meaning you're a more cost effective craftsman. But for a DIYer who has all the time in the world, so to speak, labor efficiency doesn't matter so much.

                          Same thing with these wrenches. They aren't the right tool for a professional mechanic or for use in an industrial environment - but that should have been obvious. For a one time use to break a lug nut free or crank up a scissor jack to replace a tire on the side of the road... well it's probably fine. And if it isn't... well most people call a tow truck these days anyway. Guys and gals like us who believe it's important to know how to change one's own tires probably have their own cheater bar in the vehicle anyway.

                          I still find it interesting to see how things are being made - we should all think of videos like this when we are perusing the Harbor Freight ad with $9.99 socket sets or whatever. In those cases, this is the kind of quality you're getting and the kind of labor you're supporting.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Kretz is right there's all kinds of different ways of doing things and it's all ok,,,

                            over here or at least in my town we just use the trowel as a trowel and buy a cheap ass wrench like in the video to break the bricks with...

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              I could not find any reference that suggests using a trowel to split bricks. Trowels can be very expensive and good ones are specially made to have proper flex and balance. Here is a fairly complete discussion of masonry tools and techniques:

                              https://work.chron.com/bricklayer-tools-13328.html

                              And a warning to stop using the trowel to cut bricks:

                              https://www.concreteconstruction.net...e-777cb4400000

                              However, the following does mention the use of the trowel to cut bricks, although it may be controversial:

                              https://ibrick.info/how-to-choose-a-brick-trowel/

                              This shows how to cut a brick with a trowel, but it is a cored brick, not a solid brick, so it would be much easier.

                              Last edited by PStechPaul; 01-03-2022, 04:09 PM.
                              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                              USA Maryland 21030

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post

                                Sorry, professional bricklayers cut bricks with the edge of the trowel, so it does need to to strong. A couple of well directed hits and the brick is in 2. Far faster than going over to the brick saw, and no dust.
                                When I have seen it done, they have done it with the "back edge" of the trowel, not up at the point. Worked fine for them.
                                CNC machines only go through the motions

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X