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  • #31
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    People can call BS all they want. And they may have one (ONE) that works fine.
    I have three (THREE) that are well used and yep - all 'work fine'. One is a (Craftsman reel) that hangs on the ceiling, is well over 20 years old, and holds the plugs very firmly, and one that has been through the wringer (used it on 2 separate occasions today, ironically) under 'contractor' use. 100% lifetime success rate in my instance, so yeah, bull$hit.
    No one ever said that every one ever made was good, or any particular one, for that matter.

    I can only share my experience. Think as you wish as I have no compulsive need to argue every little thing at length, regardless of how silly or pointless.
    Location: North Central Texas

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    • #32
      Since this is the thread about receptacles, I have a question for you. If you have one of these and you plug it into into a regular outlet like this, what do you think will happen? I know what happens but I want to see how many of you guys also know.
      Last edited by Arcane; 01-08-2022, 12:11 AM.
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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      • #33
        Not sure it is identical, but I do have one or two similar to that. One has only one plug on the back, the other has two. Both seem to work for minimal loads such as a laptop, second screen, plus lamp.

        No bad results with what I have. Mine have a "spike protection" MOV setup in them, which the picture you posted does not show.

        badly made ones might have any of several problems..... I think I saw one once that was cross-wired in a way that would actually pop the breaker.
        4357 2773 5150 9120 9135 8645 1007 1190 2133 9120 5942

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Everything not impossible is compulsory

        "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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        • #34
          You can stack these multi-outlet adapters and power strips to power 250 strands of lights, but let the power company know before switching them on :

          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

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          • #35
            Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post

            That you cannot "legally" plug into an extension cord. Same with power strips.
            lakeside53 , Please give the reference to where you determined it is not legal to plug an adapter or power strip into an extension cord. Now if you are referring to "permanent wiring" rules that is different. If you are then the extension cord is not legal in the first place!
            Robin

            Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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            • #36
              No not that... It a L&L issue. The devices cannot be chained unless they are listed as such, and they are not. Same rules for not plugging a power tap (strip) into another power strip. I'll dig it up..

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                According to what? Not NEC ... NFPA? ... federal regulation? ... insurance co?
                Here's one : Tons of references to this issue on any search engine.

                OSHA's standard at 29 CFR §1910.303(b)(2), Installation and use, requires that "Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling." Manufacturers and nationally recognized testing laboratories determine the proper uses for power strips. For example, the UL Directory contains instructions that require UL-listed RPTs to be directly connected to a permanently installed branch circuit receptacle; they are not to be series-connected to other RPTs or connected to extension cords. UL also specifies that RPTs are not intended for use at construction sites and similar locations.


                In this state everything plugged in has to comply with a National lab testing requirements (UL, etc)- commercial or residential. So same listing rules apply. Insurance companies get covered by the stated policy need to comply with all local rules. Seems nobody care at Christmas time for outside lights though.

                At work we had a maze of inter-connected cords (temporary or not, doesn't matter) and power taps. We got a very short time to correct after a Fire Marshal and L&I inspection (enforces osha here).

                Even power strips cannot be attached to furniture or walls unless they can be removed without any tools, inc. a screwdriver. That's why they have the infuriating star hole patten on the back that allows you to manually snap the power tap over the perfectly located and sized screw heads, in theory. We use industrial velro for several hundred of them. LOL. I went down the rathole to find power taps listed for attachment to furniture or structure... frigg... rarer than hen's teeth.
                Last edited by lakeside53; 01-08-2022, 01:48 AM.

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                • #38
                  Coincidentally, I was just watching an episode of "Monk" where he was on an airplane with an overzealous extension cord salesman.

                  https://monk.fandom.com/wiki/Mr._Monk_and_the_Airplane
                  http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                  Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                  USA Maryland 21030

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post

                    Here's one : Tons of references to this issue on any search engine.

                    OSHA's standard ....

                    In this state everything plugged in has to comply with a National lab testing requirements ...
                    OSHA - "Occupational ..." pretty much all of us are exempt from their rules.

                    In my state, the regulation law-happy Massachusetts, there is no such requirement ... that I have ever heard of. Now, in your state none of your hobby machinists can legally wire up VFDs or DC motor controls without being in violation, right? Nobody with an electronics hobby can power up their creations, no home-built HAM equipment? My guess is that law is never enforced and is only there to enable insurers to avoid paying claims.

                    But then I didn't read your first post as being serious. More of a "That's illegal, don't do it. <wink, wink>" thing.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post

                      Here's one : Tons of references to this issue on any search engine.

                      OSHA's standard at 29 CFR §1910.303(b)(2), Installation and use, requires that "Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling." Manufacturers and nationally recognized testing laboratories determine the proper uses for power strips. For example, the UL Directory contains instructions that require UL-listed RPTs to be directly connected to a permanently installed branch circuit receptacle; they are not to be series-connected to other RPTs or connected to extension cords. UL also specifies that RPTs are not intended for use at construction sites and similar locations.


                      In this state everything plugged in has to comply with a National lab testing requirements (UL, etc)- commercial or residential. So same listing rules apply. Insurance companies get covered by the stated policy need to comply with all local rules. Seems nobody care at Christmas time for outside lights though.

                      At work we had a maze of inter-connected cords (temporary or not, doesn't matter) and power taps. We got a very short time to correct after a Fire Marshal and L&I inspection (enforces osha here).

                      Even power strips cannot be attached to furniture or walls unless they can be removed without any tools, inc. a screwdriver. That's why they have the infuriating star hole patten on the back that allows you to manually snap the power tap over the perfectly located and sized screw heads, in theory. We use industrial velro for several hundred of them. LOL. I went down the rathole to find power taps listed for attachment to furniture or structure... frigg... rarer than hen's teeth.
                      Plug strips with mounting holes are rare? I can google "metal plug strip" and find hundreds of options...
                      -paul

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