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  • Jon Heron
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    Probably

    Prolly cause you have too much carbs still in yer sugar. You didtnt cook the sugar out of the grain or you didnt get yer temp right. You have to slightly pull the sugar out of the grain. Do it too fast and you will get solids and starch. Those two. no good. Check yer temps. maybe?? I dont know, I am dumb at best. .. JR
    Ya the problem was solved, it was a bad temperature probe that was reading about 8 degrees hotter then actual. If you mash too hot the sugars produced become too complex for the yeast to convert which is what leads to the sweet taste and low alcohol.
    Cheers,
    Jon

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Jon Heron View Post

    Me too, it is handy to be able to reference previous readings etc. I only had a couple turn out crappy and it was from a bad temperature reading resulting in the mash being too hot. Makes for a low alcohol and sweet beer, yuck..
    Cheers,
    Jon
    Probably

    Prolly cause you have too much carbs still in yer sugar. You didtnt cook the sugar out of the grain or you didnt get yer temp right. You have to slightly pull the sugar out of the grain. Do it too fast and you will get solids and starch. Those two. no good. Check yer temps. maybe?? I dont know, I am dumb at best. .. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Heron
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post


    I always wrote a log for each batch, so I would know why it was so bad.
    Me too, it is handy to be able to reference previous readings etc. I only had a couple turn out crappy and it was from a bad temperature reading resulting in the mash being too hot. Makes for a low alcohol and sweet beer, yuck..
    Cheers,
    Jon
    Attached Files

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Tom S View Post

    Very cool. That's a lot of beer to go though.

    I think it you were to start brewing again you would find that while the basic processes are the same, there has been a lot of changes with technology that can make brewing either as simple or as complicated as you want. We brew using a propane burner, some thermometers, and a timer - but on the other end of the scale there are guys out there with fully automated PID controlled electric systems. You had books and personal connections for sharing recipes, with the internet it can often be recipe overload and you can tap into the experience of a vast number of people (for better or worse...). Plus the software that now makes it easy to develop your own recipes. I use one called Brewfather, where I can input all the ingredients and the process and it will tell me what to expect with all the different aspects of the beer, and how it compares to the 'standard styles'.

    Right now I'm playing around with a recipe for a Baltic Porter, but since we don't have a good lagering setup I'm tweaking it to use a Kviek yeast that ferments clean like a lager at up to 77F. However, the attenuation of the yeast is higher than a lager so I play with the ingredient levels until I've got things in the same range that a traditional lager yeast would achieve. My goal is to have a Baltic Porter that can ferment like an ale but still be crisp like it has been lagered. We'll see how it turns out.
    No doubt Tom, I did save some equipment. Maybe to get a small batch going.

    I brewed just like you do, the basics. I did make a home made sparge arm and lauter tun That was the max of my fancyness. When I was just about done with the hobby my friends were getting into heat controls, and three tiered units taller than me lol.. At least they built them.

    I always wrote a log for each batch, so I would know why it was so bad. I had one turn out like whisky, couldnt drink it, my friends did though. Damm alkies.

    I looked into some of the warm working lagering type yeasts and where I was it just stayed too hot. The frig idea sorta works but you have to find a yeast that will ferment at a very low temp cause it was in with my drinking kegs, a lil chilly. I did finally find one that worked well.

    Glad to see you are having fun with it. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Heron
    replied
    Originally posted by Tom S View Post

    Very cool. That's a lot of beer to go though.

    I think it you were to start brewing again you would find that while the basic processes are the same, there has been a lot of changes with technology that can make brewing either as simple or as complicated as you want. We brew using a propane burner, some thermometers, and a timer - but on the other end of the scale there are guys out there with fully automated PID controlled electric systems. You had books and personal connections for sharing recipes, with the internet it can often be recipe overload and you can tap into the experience of a vast number of people (for better or worse...). Plus the software that now makes it easy to develop your own recipes. I use one called Brewfather, where I can input all the ingredients and the process and it will tell me what to expect with all the different aspects of the beer, and how it compares to the 'standard styles'.

    Right now I'm playing around with a recipe for a Baltic Porter, but since we don't have a good lagering setup I'm tweaking it to use a Kviek yeast that ferments clean like a lager at up to 77F. However, the attenuation of the yeast is higher than a lager so I play with the ingredient levels until I've got things in the same range that a traditional lager yeast would achieve. My goal is to have a Baltic Porter that can ferment like an ale but still be crisp like it has been lagered. We'll see how it turns out.
    Well said Tom!
    I use Brewtarget for refining/making recipes (I am a linux guy).
    I still have not made a lager, I built a fermentation chamber and everything but I have just been enjoying the ales too much to bother.
    This hobby spoils you for store bought beer too I find, you just cant buy anything like the fresh unpasteurised nectar of the gods you can make in your own kettle...
    Cheers,
    Jon

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom S
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    Very nice!! Cool to see other brewers on the site. I started doing all grain around 1995. Got to the point where it was too much around 2001. Had a massive sears freezer converted to a frig and had six Cornelius kegs along with two carboys lagering in the same frig. I stopped brewing all together. Sold everything cept for a few kegs and CO2 system.

    I liked drinking my IPA and lagers. Nothing too dark.

    Here are some pretty good books for some nice grain bills.

    Nice safe setup there Jon. My ale carboys were just on the floor. One whole room just for brewing. Wife hated it JR

    Very cool. That's a lot of beer to go though.

    I think it you were to start brewing again you would find that while the basic processes are the same, there has been a lot of changes with technology that can make brewing either as simple or as complicated as you want. We brew using a propane burner, some thermometers, and a timer - but on the other end of the scale there are guys out there with fully automated PID controlled electric systems. You had books and personal connections for sharing recipes, with the internet it can often be recipe overload and you can tap into the experience of a vast number of people (for better or worse...). Plus the software that now makes it easy to develop your own recipes. I use one called Brewfather, where I can input all the ingredients and the process and it will tell me what to expect with all the different aspects of the beer, and how it compares to the 'standard styles'.

    Right now I'm playing around with a recipe for a Baltic Porter, but since we don't have a good lagering setup I'm tweaking it to use a Kviek yeast that ferments clean like a lager at up to 77F. However, the attenuation of the yeast is higher than a lager so I play with the ingredient levels until I've got things in the same range that a traditional lager yeast would achieve. My goal is to have a Baltic Porter that can ferment like an ale but still be crisp like it has been lagered. We'll see how it turns out.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Jon Heron View Post
    I made 11 gallons of beer yesterday! A northern English brown ale called Homers Breakfast...
    Cheers,
    Jon
    Very nice!! Cool to see other brewers on the site. I started doing all grain around 1995. Got to the point where it was too much around 2001. Had a massive sears freezer converted to a frig and had six Cornelius kegs along with two carboys lagering in the same frig. I stopped brewing all together. Sold everything cept for a few kegs and CO2 system.

    I liked drinking my IPA and lagers. Nothing too dark.

    Here are some pretty good books for some nice grain bills.

    Nice safe setup there Jon. My ale carboys were just on the floor. One whole room just for brewing. Wife hated it JR

    Click image for larger version

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  • darryl
    replied
    Ha ha. Several beers in, that's how I feel- like I've had a lobotomy. Sometimes I get to the third beer, but most of the time I stop after the second one. I don't have that urge to keep going, and going-

    I had one last night- and you know, I'll have to evaluate the effect is has on me. I don't get drunk anymore- I just get a little cloudy or something. After 13 or 14 fireballs I also get a little cloudy- but I attribute that to the chemicals they put in the dishwasher.

    Leave a comment:


  • MaxHeadRoom
    replied
    Originally posted by darryl View Post
    I have a beer in front of me as we speak--
    How does it go?
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy !
    Tadah

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Talk to your doctor. They DO have meds for that.

    The only time I enjoy beer is with pizza. I recently bought my first six pack in over 20 years to go with a frozen pizza. Both were excellent. But I need another pizza to finish the other three off. Perhaps this week.



    Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post

    I'm at the age where if I have 1 beer, I'm up 4 times a night just to get rid of it!
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 01-11-2022, 06:45 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • darryl
    replied
    I have a beer in front of me as we speak- Caribou Honey. It was a cheap one, but I don't mind it. Here's to you all-

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Heron
    replied
    Cheers to you too Darryl!
    Jon

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  • darryl
    replied
    I like to have some beers. Lately I've been trying out SteamWorks. One that I like is Heroica Red Ale. One of my hiking friends of the past made beer, and I helped him sometimes. He made something similar to the Red Ale, but boosted it to 12%. Now that was something to come home to after a long day on the trail. Problem for me was that I would meet him at his home so we could take his truck- but then I'd have to drive home after a few of those beers.

    At any rate, it was good tasting beer. Another I liked was called Dark Matter. One place in town has it, but at $8 a glass I'll learn to like something else. I've considered brewing my own beer, but the enthusiasm has never stayed long enough for me to commit to it. I'll keep trying different ones until I have a few that I really like, and those will become my staples.

    The taste and smoothness with which it goes down are more important to me than alcohol content, but it is nice to get a good buzz on without having to drink a ton of it. Some of the beers that are around 7% are just right for me.

    All this talk about beer- I think I'll go pick up a box. I'll tip one to you all, with best wishes for a healthy and prosperous new year. If you don't drink beer, no matter- tip a nice glass of fresh clean water. That's probably closer to health and prosperity than beer anyway. Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Heron
    replied
    That is great Tom!
    We have a club here too called True Grist, we usually do a couple bulk buys per year and are lucky to have a couple really good local shops too.
    Originally posted by Tom S View Post
    Did you every try the horseradish jello or the pickeled pumpkin they offer?
    No but that sounds like something to try if we are ever let out of our house again and can actually eat inside a restaurant! lol
    I used to do a lot of work at the coal plant by Nanticoke before they shut it down, we would make it a point to go to the Erie beach hotel every chance we got, best fish and chips around along with great service.
    All the best!
    Jon

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom S
    replied
    Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post

    Well the reason they were hopped in the first place is because Hops have a preservative effect.!.
    As the name says, India Pale Ale.
    During the British Raj of India, the ex-pats required a taste of home, i.e. some good beer, but the ships out of England were not refrigerated at that time and the hot traverse across the Indian Ocean tended to spoil the beer., they came up with an answer, more Hops,
    Hence IPA.
    The bittering hops yes, but you will tend to loose the aroma hops as an IPA sits. If we have a keg that sits without being served for a while we will often dry hop it again to get that aroma back before serving. My BIL brewed a west-coast IPA that was fantastic in my kegs when served fresh last summer, but the few bottles he has kicking around yet are no where near as good. They still have the the bittering hop effect and a bit of the aroma hops taste, but the beer has no smell. Strangest thing ever and not pleasant to drink because of that.

    The hoppier a beer the sooner it should be consumed, because it's going to loose that aroma. Same goes for beer with coffee flavouring - the coffee will disappear over time. If you want to age some beers the better candidates are high ABV beers that are more malt forward, like trappist ales and stouts. They will develop new and good flavours while aging.

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