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Persevering through a dificult job

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    I would have used red Loctite to retain my screw on chuck
    from coming off in reverse if I was missing the retaining
    screw. But nice you took on the challenge. Cool.
    -D
    I actually did use red loctite in addition to the screw. Used the drill this AM to attach a license plate on the rear of a roll-off semi, it put a 5/16 hole thru 1/2" plate in less than 60 seconds with a fresh screw machine bit. I shoulda took pics.

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  • Doozer
    replied
    I would have used red Loctite to retain my screw on chuck
    from coming off in reverse if I was missing the retaining
    screw. But nice you took on the challenge. Cool.
    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • Beazld
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    Yes, in fact that was the first place I looked. I have the original screw, the problem is that it is about an inch too short for the Jacobs chuck, compared to the piece of crap that Milwaukee used. The Jacobs chuck is much larger.


    Got it! Good to replace the POS chuck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    I am going to check tomorrow at my screw shop. They carry everything. They will probably want me to buy a box of them. I'll see and let you all know.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
    A man after my own ... Heart? Pocketbook? I probably would have made it myself as an act of protest even if they wanted 5 bucks for a lousy little screw. About the 5/8 vs 9/16 ... It is possible that someone actually did some engineering math and determined that 5/8 was overkill, size-wise. Less material, gotta be cheaper, right?
    In fact, I think Milwaukee engineering is pretty good. Certainly the manufacturing was good too. 5/8 is definitely overkill for a chuck that maxes out at 1/2". but I did notice that the spindle seemed to be made of some hardened and ground material, threads were shiny and smooth, and they resisted the file.

    Leave a comment:


  • boslab
    replied
    Well done, the good thing or why I like cutting LH is the tool is trundling towards the tailstock instead of the Chuck, getting some good steel, tried a bit of cold rolled once, really ragged, looked like a beaver made it, I use bright drawn mild steel these days
    mark

    Leave a comment:


  • mickeyf
    replied
    A man after my own ... Heart? Pocketbook? I probably would have made it myself as an act of protest even if they wanted 5 bucks for a lousy little screw. About the 5/8 vs 9/16 ... It is possible that someone actually did some engineering math and determined that 5/8 was overkill, size-wise. Less material, gotta be cheaper, right?

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Yes, in fact that was the first place I looked. I have the original screw, the problem is that it is about an inch too short for the Jacobs chuck, compared to the piece of crap that Milwaukee used. The Jacobs chuck is much larger.

    Originally posted by Beazld View Post
    Did you check E replacement parts? They show replacement chuck screws for M-18 hammerdrills around 3 bucks. What’s the model number on your drill?

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    For handheld drill chucks, I thought the standard was 1/2-20.?? I think they went 9/16-18 just as a form of vendor lock-in. The newer models are indeed using 1/2-20 (the industry norm)That said, the quality of their machining and manufacturing on the internal components was excellent IMHO.
    Ya, 1/2-20 is one 5/8-16 is the other, that's why I was wondering.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beazld
    replied
    Did you check E replacement parts? They show replacement chuck screws for M-18 hammerdrills around 3 bucks. What’s the model number on your drill?

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    Why did MW go to a 9/16-18 when 5/8-16 has been the standard for decades? Planned obsolescense?
    For handheld drill chucks, I thought the standard was 1/2-20.?? I think they went 9/16-18 just as a form of vendor lock-in. The newer models are indeed using 1/2-20 (the industry norm)That said, the quality of their machining and manufacturing on the internal components was excellent IMHO.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Why did MW go to a 9/16-18 when 5/8-16 has been the standard for decades? Planned obsolescense?

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    I finally got it. On the 3rd attempt.
    Motivation: online vendors wanted up to $140 for this screw. Yes, there are left-handed screw suppliers.

    I]
    Talk about getting screwed --- good for you, maybe you inquired about it and now their a little nervous that your not going to get it from them and will offer it to you for 120,,,

    then you can tell them to "die with it" always a good line to use in a situation like that...

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

    From the price you mentioned I think there are underhanded screw supplier too.😡
    I'm not sure that they are under the hand, they may be under something else. The cheapest I found was $36 ea in grade 10.9 with a hex head that I would have to modify to suit.

    Leave a comment:


  • RMinMN
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    I finally got it. On the 3rd attempt. I made a proper fitted screw of 8mm dia x 1mm pitch, left-handed. Screw is ~50mm overall with 35mm threaded portion. Used to retain the Jacobs 14N ball-bearing super-chuck, on my Milwaukee M18 hammer-drill-driver. The main thread is 9/16-18, the left-handed metric screw is to retain the chuck while in reverse. Made the screw out of 1/2" 0-1 drill rod AKA silver steel (similar to 42 CrMo)

    Still need to make the screwdriver slot.

    Motivation: online vendors wanted up to $140 for this screw. Yes, there are left-handed screw suppliers.

    Entire job done on a 1945 South Bend 9A lathe with metric change gears. I simply leave the half-nuts engaged and reverse the motor. Used a thread pitch mic to get it right on the 3rd attempt. First two attempts were a complete circus (dull tools, disengaged the half nuts, need to reverse the lead screw, etc etc. didn't work to the pitch diameter -- even if the OD is perfect it still won't go,)

    FINALLY got it.......
    From the price you mentioned I think there are underhanded screw supplier too.😡

    Leave a comment:

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