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OT: Electronics help debouncing a float switch

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  • #46
    Have you considered ground mapping radar, or something of that sort?

    I don't know all the details but the builder of the housing development where I live routed some drainage plumbing under private yards when they should have been on the development's common property. One of the lines broke and the resulting leak ended up badly flooding someone's house. The local government maps were of no use. They ended up doing some sort of pipe detection on the surface to find the leak. The builder ended up paying for everything including detecting the leak, rerouting the pipes that went through several yards, and flood damage.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
      Hard to believe no records of sewer piping. I would have expected more in the UK. Sorry.
      You're not wrong. I'd love to laud it over you how much better we've done things but I suspect that this may have been part of post-war rebuilding (the dates are about right) and either corners were cut or perhaps just with the passing of years things didn't get transferred from blueprints files who-knows-where onto modern systems. It's still a bit shoddy though.

      Originally posted by genea View Post
      Have you considered ground mapping radar, or something of that sort?
      Fortunately I think we're further along than that now. Whether the drain about-turns and goes back out the front or continues towards the back (but separate) or goes to a soakaway doesn't change the fact that we must disconnect from it. At least, having found the manhole we can infer the route of the drain from the soil stack as a straight line between the two.

      Originally posted by genea View Post
      I don't know all the details but the builder of the housing development where I live routed some drainage plumbing under private yards when they should have been on the development's common property. One of the lines broke and the resulting leak ended up badly flooding someone's house. The local government maps were of no use. They ended up doing some sort of pipe detection on the surface to find the leak. The builder ended up paying for everything including detecting the leak, rerouting the pipes that went through several yards, and flood damage.
      Sonde was definitely an option but it would have been costly. Technically I'm sure that it is possible to force all of the cost on the original builder....but unless he volunteers that, forcing the issue would cost more than just seeing what we can agree. In an ideal world he'd come back and just sort it....but evidence shows that's not the world that I live in and especially at the moment with all the delays of Covid and the extra materials costs from Brexit (whether really justified or just opportunistic) he's going to be trying to minimise his outgoings as much as the rest of us.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Cenedd View Post

        forcing the issue would cost more than just seeing what we can agree. In an ideal world he'd come back and just sort it....but evidence shows that's not the world that I live in.
        Isnt that right? My street is not that old, yet. My Mom is and they tried to cut the roots with a "special" root cutter. It did work for most if not all. Some 4" roots were cut. Specifically for roots though, no dirt. JR

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