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OT: What would Willy or AK Boomer do?

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Well I'll be dang --- you better watch it those could be powerful enough to accidentally pull a trigger !

    I like that ratchet wrench -- little less bulkier on the ends than the cheap ones I got,,, it makes you wonder though and just like mine, if it's already got a ratchet in it why not just make them 6 point for a real bite on the nutz so to speak...

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    Im still kinda in awe of BF's glove magnet,,, that's one powerful glove magnet... lol

    and now that im thinking about it --- I am amazed at the power transfer when using an impact gun with some of the extended "chain wrenches"

    when they first mentioned that in the demonstration I was like "oh yeah this is going to go well" but the fact that they even managed to get half the torque rating out of the milwaukee shocked me,,, I can tell you right off the higher end "chain wrench extenders" like Mac and Snap off had about zero chain slop to achieve that in fact they might have been assembled with ever so slight pre-load...
    You can see the round spots on the glove thumb. Those are the magnets. The index and thumb both have openings enabling you to fold the glove finger back and stick to the magnets. That frees up your bare finger and thumb to facilitate pulling the trigger and adjusting the scope more easily in cold weather. The wrench in the picture is just a 14mm so not real heavy but it worked for me so I am happy. I wear the gloves when I shoot tresspassers in winter from my hunting blind.

    Click image for larger version

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    I have noticed that the operators are trying to keep their tracks clear now that the maintenance shop has had to clean out a few of them... boss must have had a few words with management about it, and something is Getting Done (TM) about it.

    I notice that all the newer machines are supplied with large (6 feet, 2 meters) solid rubber wheels. For our purposes this is fine, since the machine is sitting on its stabilizers pads when in operation, and not on the drive wheels. Normally they only drive the machines from one location to another (about 100 years/100 meters) once or twice a day.

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  • rmcphearson
    replied
    I was asked to tighten that fan belt on a Hitachi/John Deere mini excavator in the field a few years ago during the winter in New Jersey. Soon after that I packed my stuff and moved my family to California where...I did tighten that fan belt on a JD 27D mini excavator. It was 72 F, not a cloud in the sky, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Im still kinda in awe of BF's glove magnet,,, that's one powerful glove magnet... lol

    and now that im thinking about it --- I am amazed at the power transfer when using an impact gun with some of the extended "chain wrenches"

    when they first mentioned that in the demonstration I was like "oh yeah this is going to go well" but the fact that they even managed to get half the torque rating out of the milwaukee shocked me,,, I can tell you right off the higher end "chain wrench extenders" like Mac and Snap off had about zero chain slop to achieve that in fact they might have been assembled with ever so slight pre-load...
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 01-15-2022, 08:43 PM.

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  • sarge41
    replied
    Don't know what kind of mud you all are used to, but here in southern Indiana, this yellow clay is the worst kind , no bottom to it and hard as a whore's heart when frozen. I would think that up in the northern part of the country or Canada would be worse, maybe the soil is different, maybe even sandy.
    Sarge41

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  • Ridgerunner
    replied


    Many of the track machines have an upper idler roller. If it gets in mud or frozen it does not turn. The steel track just slides across it an creates a flat spot on the roller. If the sprocket gets really frozen and an operator tries to move the machine it can twist an axle off.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Got a torch? Unfreeze the tracks.....


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  • Henro
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post

    Not so fast there Henro! No one was going to move this excavator anywhere. I forgot to clean the tracks when I parked it the night before. There was mud in the tracks and that baby ain't going anywhere until 1. I build a fire next to it. 2. It warms up enough to melt the frozen mud. Also the engine would run fine. I didn't want to move it even if I could because then the engine would be hot and there was no way to get to what I needed to get to with the engine hot. Maybe I am just a wuss!
    OK, point well taken. BUT you did not mention the frozen tracks until after you reported your success at fixing the problem.

    Hope you get the tracks unfrozen and the excavator back it service soon. I take it it is a newer one that needs battery power to operate?

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  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    This is the first time I have ever heard of a tracked vehicle being disable by frozen mud. I don't think the operators at work ever clean the tracks out, full stop. Whenever they come in the shop, we fill up a bobcat bucket with dirt after it thaws. But the machines drive themselves everywhere unless the engine is blown. Frozen or not, the mud doesn't slow them.
    You may not freeze the machine in it's tracks every time (pun intended) but you are seriously shortening the life of the undercarriage. Probably the single biggest cost of operating a tracked machine is the life of the undercarriage.
    It is the cardinal sin of tracked equipment operators and is grounds for dismissal if repeatedly caught doing so anywhere I've ever been.
    I'll bet those operators don't own the machines they're using or aren't supervised by anybody that cares or knows any better. Certainly not the guy paying the bills, if he knew.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    This is the first time I have ever heard of a tracked vehicle being disable by frozen mud. I don't think the operators at work ever clean the tracks out, full stop. Whenever they come in the shop, we fill up a bobcat bucket with dirt after it thaws. But the machines drive themselves everywhere unless the engine is blown. Frozen or not, the mud doesn't slow them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by Henro View Post
    Couldn’t help but think Willy or A K Boomer might first have jump started the excavator, since if an older model diesel it would run without electrical power supplied to it. And then would have driven it to a more comfortable place to work on it.

    ‘BUT I am sure BF has a newer model that likely needs electrical power to operate the injectors, which are controlled by electronics. In that case I bet Willy or AK would have removed the battery and charged it, put it back in, and then the drove to a better spot….

    Just speculation of course…
    Not so fast there Henro! No one was going to move this excavator anywhere. I forgot to clean the tracks when I parked it the night before. There was mud in the tracks and that baby ain't going anywhere until 1. I build a fire next to it. 2. It warms up enough to melt the frozen mud. Also the engine would run fine. I didn't want to move it even if I could because then the engine would be hot and there was no way to get to what I needed to get to with the engine hot. Maybe I am just a wuss!

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  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

    It's happening faster than you think. Not the wonderful world part but enough people want electric vehicles and manufacturers are responding. Not saying it is a great or practical vehicle for everyone but there is a waiting list for the Ford F150 Lightening and reports that people are trying to buy them just resell at a huge markup. It used to be a rare sight to see a Tesla but now I see one almost every time I go out. The grocery store near me has a charging station for customers. Sure there is not enough infrastructure for everyone to drive electric. There wasn't enough for gas vehicles in the beginning.
    I'm not saying everyone should be forced into electric vehicles. Last month I bought a Ford F150 with a 5.0l V8 for towing which is the best fit for my need. Just saying that market demand is putting more electric vehicles on the road every day.
    Yes totally agree, electric vehicles are coming on strong. Lots of charging stations sprouting up even locally. Many state and federal mandates everywhere mandating the end of passenger vehicles powered by internal combustion engines in the very near future.
    The commercial truck industry has all the major players also onboard as are the providers of conventional diesel and gas powerplants also seeing the inevitable swing toward electrification. The off-highway construction equipment manufactures are also coming out with electric models already in order to test the waters.

    As much as I'm enamored with gasoline and diesel engines as they have served me well, (always nice to dance with the devil you know ), I kind of like the the concept of electric vehicular propulsion and would actually love to have one. As a second car at this point at least until my confidence level rises.

    The elephant in the room is of course as you mentioned, infrastructure to support the huge energy demand that we will be placing on the grid over the next twenty years and beyond.

    Just think, with an electric excavator Black Forest wouldn't be whining about freezing his pinkies off while adjusting his fan belt, then he'd have no excuse for not cleaning the mud out from his undercarriage like he should have done in the first place. What's the point of adjusting a belt on a piece of equipment that's not going anywhere?

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  • Henro
    replied
    Couldn’t help but think Willy or A K Boomer might first have jump started the excavator, since if an older model diesel it would run without electrical power supplied to it. And then would have driven it to a more comfortable place to work on it.

    ‘BUT I am sure BF has a newer model that likely needs electrical power to operate the injectors, which are controlled by electronics. In that case I bet Willy or AK would have removed the battery and charged it, put it back in, and then the drove to a better spot….

    Just speculation of course…

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post
    Maybe get a tent for you all? Have a lil sleep over?? Dunno,JR
    You all can come to my place. We have a big tent set up. 15m x20m with a 6.5m high peak. Of course you could also stay in my home. We have 12 guest bedrooms!

    Leave a comment:

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