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  • OT roller chain stuff

    I know Zip/Nothing about roller chain. I have set my mind to building a slip roller to make a little thing out of copper that requires a few cylinder sections. p. I have a few lengths of roller chain to turn the thing, but my problem is the Identity of the chain I have and knowing the knowledge on this site I thought I would ask a few questions . First, one of all the chains I have I are marked 65p on every other link and 16 on the other. I guess my question is this metric or something else and where do I get information on making the sprockets for this chain? If I am what of score on this just say so.
    _____________________________________________

    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
    Oregon Coast

  • #2
    I saw leonardo da Vinci’s “ cartoons” in an art gallery in London, he drew a roller chain ( better than I could) hundreds of years ago, it looked exactly like a modern chain, awesome
    i refer to an old Reynolds transmission catalogue for all my chain data, good book and free
    mark
    ( sprockets are easy with the right cutters for RC, I use a horizontal mill myself)
    there’s a lovely gadget to pull the chain for a joining link or link and a half, chain tensioner ( wish I’d found them sooner

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    • #3
      Lugnut: Do you have a Machinery's Handbook? If you can access one, even an old one, you will find info on chain and sprockets. If no handbook, check with your local bearing house, they are usually a good source of chain and sprockets. They may have some some handouts to answer your questions. Good luck.
      Sarge41

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      • #4
        tell us the distance between pins. Tell us the width of the chain.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Erich View Post
          tell us the distance between pins. Tell us the width of the chain.
          Now I'm wondering if it is just plain old bicycle chain, I don't have a bicycle to check, any way the as close as I can measure the distance between pins is .500 and the width is .125. this is some as it appears to be new unused chain that I got at a yard sale. , I guess I will have to run down a bicycle and measure that. I see no problem to make the sprockets with a little luck. I just thought that I might find something on the market if I knew what to look for. As for know the shafts for the rollers will be in the .500 " neighborhood. I guess finding the necessary information is part of the fun to this sort of project.
          _____________________________________________

          I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
          Oregon Coast

          Comment


          • #6
            #35 chain has a breaking strength of 1000 lbs. Working strength assume about half that.
            #40 chain has a breaking strength of 5000 lbs. Working strength assume about half again.
            I think #41 is somewhere in the middle and #428 is about 2/3 there.
            But do some research, these numbers are from my memory on a chain project I did
            not too long ago. Figure your force from the radius of your sprockets and that gives
            you an idea what you need. Hint... Bicycle chain is not going to be strong enough unless
            your sprockets are 2 foot in diameter.

            --Doozer
            DZER

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            • #7
              This is kind of an oddball size of chain, same as a 410. I think there are a few other odd sizes as well that I've run across occasionally that are non-standard.
              A link to what I believe you have.

              https://www.nitrochain.com/410-non-s...ler-chain-50ft

              A chart below illustrating the more readily available and common sizes.

              https://www.usarollerchain.com/rolle...ain-size-chart

              Also below a link to a pdf catalog from Tsubaki, a very respected name that make some very good quality roller chains.This is a very comprehensive and informative reference regarding roller chains.

              http://tsubaki.ca/pdf/library/Revise...in-Catalog.pdf
              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

              Location: British Columbia

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              • #8
                Thanks for all the information guys. The slip roller I want to build in not for forming very thick Copper and will only be for one project. 22 gage copper sheet rolled into a 13" diameter drum about 13 or 14 inches long. Maybe some tapered cone shape pieces. Nothing too complicated. I do have some heavier chain, #40 I think. My problem will be making the two sprockets to connect the two lower drive rollers. I really don't have any idea how much force will be in effect.
                My next problem will be machining the sprockets. I do have a small rotary table for indexing and should, with some internet searching be able to come up with some instruction. NOW if any one has a link to some help with that, feel free to jump in and point me to a plan. 🙄
                _____________________________________________

                I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                Oregon Coast

                Comment


                • #9
                  Indexing is easy.
                  How do you plan to put the radii on the teeth ?
                  CNC?

                  -D
                  DZER

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                  • #10
                    CNC ! I got no stinking CNC. I hate the thought of buying two sprockets, but I might be forced to it. I could make a trip to the metal recyclers in Albany 70 miles away. I do need some other goodies they normally have. I kind of need to get away for little bit anyway. Would be possible to make a form cutter to cut the teeth ? you got remember I just have little bitty home, hobby shop machinery.🤔
                    _____________________________________________

                    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                    Oregon Coast

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It’s not the HSM way, but, I’d bet any farm supply store would sell you a pair of small sprockets for less than a form cutter will cost.

                      One trip around the blank using a center cutting end mill to drill each tooth space plus a couple more trips to bevel the point would make an acceptable low speed sprocket.

                      Don’t think a form cutter is required. Sprockets are easier than gears.
                      SVS
                      Senior Member
                      Last edited by SVS; 01-15-2022, 03:41 AM.

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                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=SVS;n1980767]It’s not the HSM way, but, I’d bet any farm supply store would sell you a pair of small sprockets for less than a form cutter will cost.

                        One trip around the blank using a center cutting end mill to drill each tooth space plus a couple more trips to bevel the point would make an acceptable low speed sprocket.

                        Don’t think a form cutter is required. Sprockets are easier than gears. [/QUOTESVS,

                        I like you're thinking, that is about what I had originally in mind, and I think I will give it a go. We don't have a store here where I live on the coast, but Amazon is as close as the Post Office and I can let my fingers do the walking.
                        But then I still want to try making them myself. I have decided to use 2 13" sprockets with 1/2" bore and Amazon had them for $9 each, if I fail and making them. This critter is probably only going to be used for this one project I have in mind
                        _____________________________________________

                        I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                        Oregon Coast

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you can buy’em for $9, I bet you can make them for $90.

                          I’m exaggerating, but one end mill and two blanks and you’ll be over $18.

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                          • #14
                            Try using motorcycle sprockets, cheap and available in a range of sizes
                            mark

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                            • #15
                              Years ago I came across this slip roller, just after I had built my own. I wished that I had seen it sooner because it is so much simpler. "Simple" is good for you because of your one-shot need.

                              Click image for larger version

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                              There is the same linkage on the other end, but 90* out of phase. Unfortunately I don't have a link, but there wasn't much build info, as I remember.

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