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  • #16
    I made a couple of chain sprockets for a project. There are some pics of the process about halfway down tjis page:

    http://bullfire.net/4th_Axis/4th_Axis.html

    Ed
    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by ed_h View Post
      I made a couple of chain sprockets for a project. There are some pics of the process about halfway down tjis page:

      http://bullfire.net/4th_Axis/4th_Axis.html

      Ed
      Thank you ed_h, those photos gave me a idea, I will see if my DRO on my little mill will lay out a sprocket that I can use. Wish me luck
      Thanks
      Mel
      _____________________________________________

      I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
      Oregon Coast

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      • #18
        What diameter are the cylinders you're rolling and how many?
        Could the sheet be formed around am object of suitable size? How close to perfectly cylindrical does it need to be? Are endcaps of some sort going to close the cylinder ends?

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        • #19
          I think you’ll find a roller won’t work that well on the light of material. As far as sprockets they’re too cheap to bother making in my opinion. Just bought 2 20 tooth #40 sprockets and weld on hubs for around $30 cad.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
            What diameter are the cylinders you're rolling and how many?
            Could the sheet be formed around am object of suitable size? How close to perfectly cylindrical does it need to be? Are endcaps of some sort going to close the cylinder ends?
            I have a bunch of rollers from some of the treadmills I have dismantled. They are 1.5" and some are 2". I plan on using 2 of the 1.5" for bottom drivers, and one 2" for the top adjustable roller. After rummaging in my metal pile, decided on using the bicycle chain iI have. For practice, I started making the 2 drive sprockets, with the aid of my DRO to lay out and drill holes to form the teeth, 13 of them. I love the way you can lay out a hole circle pattern with a DRO. Tomorrow. I will work on finishing the sprockets after I get back from town getting my COVID booster shot.
            _____________________________________________

            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
            Oregon Coast

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            • #21
              https://www.usarollerchain.com/65-Ro...chain-10ft.htm
              -paul

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              • #22
                Well today I finally got the slip roller working. It tested my patience a few times but I stuck it out and today I put it all together and I think it will do what I wanted it for. Don't laugh at my welding on the "T" handles, I don't weld but a couple times a year. I was able to layout and drill the sprockets to fit bicycle chain, and they work ok. I could not buy a master link for the chain I had, so I bought a whole new chain just to get the master link. Other than the chain, I was able to source all the rest from my parts and pieces that have saved.

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                _____________________________________________

                I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                Oregon Coast

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                • #23
                  I am just now in the process of testing and tuning up the lifter for the drill press table I've thrown together... using a motor from a paper shredder and an old bicycle chain. You don't (didn't) need a master link at all. What you need is a chain rivet tool, to remove and replace individual links as needed to get to the correct length for your application. A bike shop, or Amazon, or a good hardware store will have one. May cost less than a chain, and now you have yet another tool to keep forever!
                  "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                  • #24
                    Mickeyf , it was a cheap chain, $7 a chain rivet tool costs more.
                    _____________________________________________

                    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                    Oregon Coast

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                    • #25
                      Bewarem Some chains are so similar to each other that you may be ledup the garden path. North American #40 has a slightly different size of roller than the British equivalent. Please do not ask how I know ! Regards David Powell.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by David Powell View Post
                        Bewarem Some chains are so similar to each other that you may be ledup the garden path. North American #40 has a slightly different size of roller than the British equivalent. Please do not ask how I know ! Regards David Powell.
                        Every thing between us and them is slightly different. But if you build in enough slop, both will fit
                        _____________________________________________

                        I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                        Oregon Coast

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                        • #27
                          Looks like garage door chain to me.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by lugnut View Post

                            Every thing between us and them is slightly different. But if you build in enough slop, both will fit
                            Excuse me Lugnut but that statement about slop is absolutely wrong. You build in clearance not slop. You build in versatility not slop. You build in adjustability. Got it!
                            Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                            How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                            • #29
                              it was a cheap chain, $7 a chain rivet tool costs more.
                              By gosh- you're right! I thought I got one once for maybe $4.95. But this (probably about as cheap as they get now) one includes a master link as well:

                              https://www.walmart.com/ip/Bike-Shop...ains/573588233

                              To be fair, I couldn't find my $5 model and got a much nicer one for more money anyway.

                              Roller looks good - I'm not one to laugh at anybody's welding.
                              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Black Forest View Post

                                Excuse me Lugnut but that statement about slop is absolutely wrong. You build in clearance not slop. You build in versatility not slop. You build in adjustability. Got it!
                                My gosh You are getting a little feisty lately. This the second time this week, you have gotten rough with someone on the forum. What do you call "chill pills" in German? what ever they are called you need to get some.
                                _____________________________________________

                                I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                                Oregon Coast

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