Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Getting those toolmaker quality chamfers on parts......how?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    JT you need to send me some money! I just ordered one of those Biax 55,000rpm grinders to do edges with a unit like Stefan made. Those Biax cost 600€. I think I need to block this site in my browser.
    I'm afraid you will have to take old fashioned Texas personal responsibility there....... Is that what they cost.... cripes... now I KNOW I'll use the Foredom! I'm too stubborn to spend that much on a single tool that I won't use so much.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    JT you need to send me some money! I just ordered one of those Biax 55,000rpm grinders to do edges with a unit like Stefan made. Those Biax cost 600€. I think I need to block this site in my browser.

    Leave a comment:


  • oxford
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	8CB6CD5A-A2B4-4BDC-940B-85E852E6A794.png
Views:	63
Size:	3.00 MB
ID:	1987377 I did the chamfers in the laminate with a router. The chamber in the steel part was done with a 6 flute standard countersink in the mill.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    Have you found any 1/8 shank carbide 90* cutters yet? .
    Rogue Systems Inc makes a nice 1/8 inch mill drill with a 90° point.

    https://www.carbidetoolsource.com/mill-drill-90-degree

    Those are really handy for things like control panels where you can drill through, Mill out, and chamfer with one tool.

    Of course more in the spirit of precisely answering the actual question they also make chamfer Mills that size. If all you are doing with it is chamfering the chamfer Mill would be a better choice because it would be stronger.

    https://www.carbidetoolsource.com/new-products-1
    It's pretty hard to beat five of them for $22.

    I buy probably 75 to 85% of all my mills from them. Single form thread mills, auminum specific mills, etc... Their coated mills for steel cutting are decent as well. I've been very happy with the quality and the consistency. Shipping is pretty fast. And the price is very good.

    I try to trade with them because they're a small garage shop in the Pacific Northwest here in the USA, but I wouldn't keep trading with them if their quality wasn't every bit as good as any other thing I've tried in the products that they provide.

    I would say not a shill and they aren't paying me, but on my last order they back ordered seven out of 10 parts. They mailed those seven missing parts one day later, and included three free pieces to make up for the inconvenience. Given that I didn't complain or even contact them about the back order and that the back order was filled so fast I was a little bit stunned that they included any free product.

    My only complaint is that they don't always respond to emails. Given how fast they are and how good their product is I can forgive that.


    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    .................... Well, maybe not perfect enough for Jerry, but good enough for me lol....................
    I'd like to get a chamfer that is nice and straight, first. Where the angle is pretty much the same visually, all along, and the edges stay visually the same distance apart.... not wavy.

    That seems a fairly low bar, so I'm hoping yours is that good 😉😏

    It's a big bonus, of course, if the surface doesn't have tool marks that jump out at you. But, truthfully, the chamfer doesn't have to be any better than the surfaces it is between.

    Again, seems a low enough bar.

    The climb cutting seems a bit worrisome when using a hand operated tool like the Gotteswinter one, which I plan to do a modified version of. I don't have feedscrews, and my backlash is larger than that of my mills.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joel
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    The holding method for the router testing was a bit sketchy
    I have had good luck using a router table, which sure makes some jobs easier. I use a 1/2" shank piloted bit and cut conventionally, then a smooth and steady return, climb cutting.
    I suspect it takes very little bit runout or bearing looseness to get scallops. I have done a little block sanding to make them look perfect and retain definition.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    You might be right about the climb cutting. I'll have to try that on the next one.

    The holding method for the router testing was a bit sketchy and the part was also not that great for holding onto. Plus look at the diameter of the fairly big cutter. So some of me was worried about it grabbing and pulling it away and my fingers jumping into the cutter. So it was all conventional milling so I could control the push and part retention better. All aimed at keeping my red stuff inside and my fingers at their original lengths....

    I have a few things to do on some other parts that was the reason for stopping to make the darn handle. I just had it with the usual floppy ended milling wrench when it fell off the vise and onto my foot. That horrid thing is in the scrap bin where it belongs.... And why I stopped for a few hours to FINALLY make the handle shown.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    I'm surprised you had less than acceptable results from the router. I use one every day to put chamfers on aluminum blocks and they come out damn near perfect. Well, maybe not perfect enough for Jerry, but good enough for me lol. IMO the secret is climb cutting, and making a 2nd skim pass, although for smaller stuff (under 0.05") I just go 1 and done.

    Leave a comment:


  • ezduzit
    replied
    BC--that is a good test and an appropriately sized chamfer.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    Have you found any 1/8 shank carbide 90* cutters yet? I went looking for some a few days ago after catching up on this thread and was thinking along the same lines for my Foredom style clone hand piece or possibly to use with my drywall cutter that also takes 1/8 shank tools. All thanks to that SG video.

    The renewed interest resulted in me using my router to chamfer the edges of my new aluminium milling vise speed wrench. The results were far less than ideal. Yes it made a consistent and sharp edged chamfer. But it was all jumpy and scalloped despite trying to move slowly. Perhaps due to the size of the cutter and the fact that it's a wood working router it was juddering/chattering and that is the issue. But in the end it looked so "chewy" that I had to use..... WAIT FOR IT ! .... a file to smooth the chamfers...

    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1040423.jpg
Views:	147
Size:	171.4 KB
ID:	1983984 ​ ​​​​​​​

    But it did make me think that a smaller non piloted chamfer cutter and with a pin style depth stop on this base that it might work at least for aluminium. I have one more speed handle to do and I think I'll buy a smaller cutter and try it again.

    But no way I'd want to even TRY doing as wide a chamfer as shown on steel or with a wood working router under any circumstances. The chamfer shown is 0.1 inch wide. So the "triangle" that was cut away was .070 on each side to get the 0.1 across the face of the chamfer.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Yep. But that Stefan Gotteswinter version looks pretty decent. Set up right, you really can't go to far, so you can just "spark out" and have a good chamfer. and it is much more compact than the other attempts. I like it. I'll be using a Foredom instead of the little die grinder, but that's a different issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Superbowl
    replied
    It's much harder to do one off items. When you are making 100s or 1,000s of items, all the same, you get lots of practice and can set up jigs to make things perfect. The first few imperfect practice ones get trashed.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

    That is pretty funny considering the content of your signature lines ! Sounds like first hand advise.
    Show biz is all about making the audience happy. Looks like I succeeded in your case.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    I think you are gonna have to take some memory drugs. .
    That is pretty funny considering the content of your signature lines ! Sounds like first hand advise.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied


    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Jerry -
    It is quite clear that no chamfering solution presented here will be satisfactory to you.
    I think you need to hire the work out to be done. I am thinking the Asian ladies at
    the nail salon can help you out with their emery boards and small hands.
    Maybe ask about the additional services to improve your world vision.

    -D
    I think you are gonna have to take some memory drugs. Or be a little less interested in channeling "Bented"

    An idea was posted that as I mentioned, looks good with a bit of modification.

    A hint.... it was posted by Genea, and is the best suggestion in this entire thread. It's on the list.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 01-29-2022, 10:21 AM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X