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Extending the length of a tap to get to an awkward place?

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  • Extending the length of a tap to get to an awkward place?

    For example, where just using a regular tap handle would bump into some other part.
    I think there was a thread recently where a few different techniques for this were discussed, but I'm darned if I can find it. Of course, by the time people respond I probably will have figured something out, but at least then I'll see how poor my solution was and have better ideas for next time.
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

  • #2
    weld a rod on end to extend.
    Purchase a pulley tap.

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    • #3
      Erwin tap holder and a 3/8 socket extension
      Ed
      Agua Dulce, So.California
      1950 F1 street rod
      1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
      1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
      1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
      1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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      • #4
        8 or 12 point socket and an extension. Not for precision use but works for maintenance tasks.

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        • #5
          I have a long bolt silver- brazed to a tap to clean out the threads for the water pump on on Ferd smallblocks...

          t
          rusting in Seattle

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          • #6
            I’ve have a set Tap Sockets and they work great O ring in end to keep tap from falling and appropriate size square inside to hold Tap.Click image for larger version  Name:	E68A203B-7DC9-4F2E-863C-E25DA514564E.png Views:	1 Size:	399.1 KB ID:	1981277

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            • #7
              you need a tap extender I got a whole bunch in an auction lot recently and they're really neat to use, typically with a shank diameter the same as the taps that fit in them. Before I got them I've superglued a tap into a nutsetter which did the job.

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              • #8
                Irwin makes an extended ratcheting reversible tap wrench that is very handy for smaller taps.
                Larry - west coast of Canada

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                • #9
                  I bought an assortment of 7 used pulley taps up to 1/2-13 on eBay. Paid $10. Haven't needed them yet, but the day is coming. If you wait until you need it, you will pay too much to get it.
                  It's all mind over matter.
                  If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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                  • #10
                    I took an old tap of the same size and sharpened the square end, Then I took a piece of bar stock and drilled a hole the same size as the flats on the tap. Then Using the tap as a broach I made a socket for a useful tap.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                      I’ve have a set Tap Sockets and they work great O ring in end to keep tap from falling and appropriate size square inside to hold Tap.Click image for larger version Name:	E68A203B-7DC9-4F2E-863C-E25DA514564E.png Views:	1 Size:	399.1 KB ID:	1981277
                      Lisle was difficult to find around here so I opted for banggood/aliexpress/ebay

                      https://www.banggood.com/Drillpro-M4...p-1603608.html

                      quality-wise seemed better than I expected and the sping gizmo keeps tap from falling out.
                      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rustybolt View Post
                        I took an old tap of the same size and sharpened the square end, Then I took a piece of bar stock and drilled a hole the same size as the flats on the tap. Then Using the tap as a broach I made a socket for a useful tap.
                        Along that line in a pinch where I just wanted to get the job done I'd use the lathe to drill a hole that was maybe .02 to .025 smaller than the across the points dimension in some mild steel rod. Then while gripping the tap in some alloy padded jaws in the vise drive the rod onto the square. The tap would self broach and press fit itself deeply enough to get the job done. After it was done a few taps on the outside of the extension over the flats would "square oval" the rod by enough that the tap would drop out.

                        It's crude doing it that way but quick. And you don't need to go shopping or wait for any delivery.
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the ideas!
                          I have used the "find a 12 point socket that fits" method in the past, but have found it a bit "iffy". I've been reluctant to weld/solder and extension onto a tap, but I'll probably try that since I do have spares, and that one would not need to get used often. Also will try Rustybolt and BCRider's ideas. Long term I'll look for pulley taps &/or tap sockets.
                          "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                          • #14
                            I have an Emuge #10 tap extension that is really slim.
                            Like 1/4" slim. It is made so nicely and hardened and
                            ground finish, it is like man jewellery. I do have a set
                            of those Lisle sockets. They are super great.
                            I bought 1/4" hex adapters for them to use in the
                            cordless impact. That is a killer combination for tapping.

                            -Doozer
                            DZER

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                            • #15
                              Another way (with a weaker drive) is simply grind a flat on the shank of the tap and drill a piece of rod stock bigger enough to hold a set screw to the flat. If I were doing it as a regular and clearance wasn't a big deal I'd take a T tap holder and cut the handle side either 1/4" hex or 3/8 square, depending on size of the tap needed. Or make an adapter to do effectively the same if you don't want to ruin a holder.

                              Grandad of course would just silver braze the tap to a shank.
                              Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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