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Brake line double flare fitting help..

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  • #16
    Hi Oxford,

    This is encouraging news that more than one member has posted about the brass fitting instead of a form tool and the extra work involved. I will have to check this idea out in more detail.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

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    • #17
      I did an entire old-ish car. Replaced all the brake system. Made more double flares than I was expecting.

      I ended up getting good at it. Decided to buy a hydralike flaring tool. Saves my wore our hands

      Yeah, looks like a double flare to me. Seperate from the threaded fitting is what I see, normally. JR

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
        Hi Oxford,

        This is encouraging news that more than one member has posted about the brass fitting instead of a form tool and the extra work involved. I will have to check this idea out in more detail.

        TX
        Mr fixit for the family
        Chris
        older brake master cylinders had inserts for the brake line to seat against. perhaps you could pick through some at a junk yard or core pile and remove some. sheet metal screw and dykes is all you need.
        san jose, ca. usa

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by JRouche View Post

          I ended up getting good at it. Decided to buy a hydralike flaring tool. Saves my wore our hands
          JR
          I have a small hydraulic flaring tool. They are awesome, once you use one you will never want to use a manual one again.

          Comment


          • #20
            Have you measured the threads on both ends of the fitting? The fitting looks suspiciously like an adaptor from a metric to SAE brake line. If that's the case they're available from a number of vendors that supply parts for race cars. I found I needed a similar fitting when installing a towed vehicle braking system on a motorhome. I believe I found the one I needed at Summit racing for around $12.00

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            • #21
              I have made quite a few race car fittings like that
              (never road car fittings, because liability)
              by welding or silver brazing parts together.
              It's pretty easy to find the component ends you need-
              it's often a MESS to screw a bunch of adaptors together,
              maybe with a tee or a cross.
              So I just assemble my own.

              In that case, I'd just braze a female double flare fitting to a banjo bolt,
              drill a hole, and done.

              Super quick, very durable, very cheap.

              But not nearly as much machining fun as a form tool, agreed.

              t
              Last edited by Tobias-B; 01-20-2022, 08:24 PM.
              rusting in Seattle

              Comment


              • #22
                Hi Guys,

                Thanks for the additional suggestions, I will be looking into all of these ideas this weekend. Tobias-B Your not far off at all, this will expand my fun and knowledge for sure, and I'm looking forward to the challenge, at least till I crash the tool bit doing internal threading or run out of test material before I get it handled..

                TX
                Mr fixit for the family
                Chris

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Tobias-B View Post
                  I have made quite a few race car fittings like that
                  (never road car fittings, because liability)
                  by welding or silver brazing parts together.
                  It's pretty easy to find the component ends you need-
                  it's often a MESS to screw a bunch of adaptors together,
                  maybe with a tee or a cross.
                  So I just assemble my own.

                  In that case, I'd just braze a female double flare fitting to a banjo bolt,
                  drill a hole, and done.

                  Super quick, very durable, very cheap.

                  But not nearly as much machining fun as a form tool, agreed.

                  t
                  As much as I look up to Tobias, I have to say no...

                  Dont ever weld on your brake bars, unless you know how two. I say dont weld on your brake arms.

                  Steering and brakes.

                  I do, you shouldn't. JR



                  In that case, I'd just braze a female double flare fitting to a banjo bolt,
                  drill a hole, and done.

                  Super quick, very durable, very cheap.

                  But not nearly as much machining fun as a form tool, agreed.

                  t

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    JR, I been doin' it for decades.
                    Even welded caliper brackets to trailing arms.

                    One look at the forces involved in the hydraulics,
                    and there's so much safety factor it's nuts.

                    Brake hydraulics seldom exceed 2000 psi- the strength
                    of lead solder is greater than that.
                    As long as there is reasonable surface area in the fitting,
                    the tiny fluid passageways generate less force on it than vibration
                    does from wheel motion.

                    That said, I don't do it for STREET cars, as
                    we live in a litigious society that values attitude over ability.

                    t

                    rusting in Seattle

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Tobias-B View Post
                      JR, I been doin' it for decades.
                      Even welded caliper brackets to trailing arms.

                      One look at the forces involved in the hydraulics,
                      and there's so much safety factor it's nuts.

                      Brake hydraulics seldom exceed 2000 psi- the strength
                      of lead solder is greater than that.
                      As long as there is reasonable surface area in the fitting,
                      the tiny fluid passageways generate less force on it than vibration
                      does from wheel motion.

                      That said, I don't do it for STREET cars, as
                      we live in a litigious society that values attitude over ability.

                      t
                      Again. I look up to you with the car stuff. I am not about a contest. My tires are BIG! ! No, thats not me...

                      I am small scale JR

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Are you talking a double flare that can be made with this kit ? https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/79029815

                        JL.......

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Hi JoeLee,

                          Yeah the project is about making a fitting that has a male double flare bulb in the bottom of a internal threaded fitting for the wheel cylinders so that a bleed port can be installed. The original part was removed at some point, they are expensive and not very available so I am making them to learn and have fun doing it.

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                          Thanks for asking. I'm in the shop tooling up and cutting the form tool right now. I'll report back when I do my test runs and see how it goes.

                          TX
                          Mr fixit for the family
                          Chris

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            On the side view of the fitting, is that a witness mark from the banjo, or is it two pieces soldered together?
                            -paul

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Hi psomero,

                              The fitting was borrowed from another car buddy to get the measurements and such to make my own. That is a hole in one side for the banjo fitting to put a bleed screw into. The bolt I'm making is for the banjo fitting and hard line connections to the wheel cylinder. The end view is the double flare bulb that I need to make the form tool for and see if I can cut it and single point the treads as well. I have also looked into the idea suggested earlier in the post about making the bulb fitting a press fit into the bolt, which if I can't get the form tool work down I will go for plan "B" and make the brass bulb with a press fit. I'm looking forward to the challenge of learning to grind a form tool, too use it and see how it all comes out.

                              it's a land for the banjo which gets copper washers on both sides to seal it.

                              I'll be updating when I have some results for better or worse..LOL..

                              TX
                              Mr fixit for the family
                              Chris
                              Last edited by Mr Fixit; 01-22-2022, 02:35 PM. Reason: answering his question.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                HI Group,

                                So the update. I made the form tool and started with a piece of aluminum. I got the hole drilled and bored for the ID for threads and then tried to cut the 45* bulb in the bottom and I almost got it 1 time and then the tool broke. So, I made another tool and started over. I got to the same place pretty quickly since it was a repeat task. I started to form the bulb and was almost done and crashed the bit into the hole because I lost track of the # of turns on the compound dial. OH and the bit broke again.

                                So I decided to go to plan "B" and make the part with a press fit bulb in the bottom. I have made the bulbs and started the bolt and had to stop for supper. I'll update more later.

                                That's the reason for the new post about compound slide dials. I may be making a part (split dial) to use the lathe so I can make the part, if you know what I mean...LOL

                                TX
                                Mr fixit for the family
                                Chris

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