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A new small project: Crosslide for the Boley

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    That's about what I am figuring. And the indexing is, as you can see in an earlier post, just by a spring loaded ball falling into drilled dimples. Not super positive nor repeatable. It might be more positive with a ball-end milling cutter of the same radius as the ball (although maybe not, on second thought)..

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  • kf2qd
    replied
    A slightly bigger lathe, (most are...) that had the index spots and 99% of the time they were not in the right place. If you grind all your tools perfect then maybe they would be okay,...

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    I may do that. possibly at 30 degree angles, dunno. When I do know what I want, I'll maybe do it.

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  • oxford
    replied
    I used a few 4 way tool posts that had an indexing feature on them, at least one had spots to set the tool post on a 45 degree.

    It might be worth modifying your index plate to add a few more positions.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    No doubt some have been chuckling at me for being awfully silly... But I finally did catch on.

    The little 4 way had a spring under the conical cap, not a terribly strong spring. It served as a camouflage for what I really needed to do to begin with.

    Obviously, if I got rid of the spring (which I had already done), and put a nut under there, I could at least clamp the pivot piece that has the dimples in it so that once positioned and clamped, it would not move. It would not have any "index" to the slot in the topslide, but it would stay in position. The wingnut could be loosened and the post indexed.

    Since I don't like to have things that do not work, when I know how to fix them, I just had to make the needed part. So off I went to the shop to get it done.

    I decided on my favorite type of 2-flat nut, because it looks good, and is not hard to make. Since everything about the 4 way is metric, I had to tap it M6, but I have a selection of metric taps and did that. Just for annoyance, I also made the nut 9mm, both to go along with the theme, and because that gave it the best flat width, better than 3/8" (9,5mm).

    The nut, with wrench




    In position on the M6 stud, clamping the base/pivot in position




    With the toolpost block, and showing the inside of the conical top washer




    Now the whole thing fits together, and can be loosened to index properly. BTW, the tool block is 0.984" square, or 25mm, x 9,1mm tall



    I have not decided if it is worth adding some form of alignment to the base, to allow it to always attach to the topslide with the same alignment. That could be somewhat limiting as far as the indexing goes. But I suppose there is no law that says I have to use the index positions if I donlt want to. And it is possible to add dimples to provide more index angles.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 02-04-2022, 12:25 PM.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    An amusing side note. I showed somewhere above that the little 4-way turret tool post has an indexing feature. But, there is a problem.

    Whoever made it did not provide any means to secure the "washer" that has the index dimples in it so that it does not move. It's just a round washer-shaped part that does not in any way lock to the topslide, so the indexing feature is actually unusable!

    It would need to be held steady so that it stays in one position when you loosen the wing nut and turn the body of the toolpost. But it simply turns along with the post. It looks like someone did not think about what was actually needed to make the feature work. There is nothing at all to hold that part, not even a key to keep it from rotation, let alone anything to stop it from sliding along the t-slot.

    Of course, the ability of a spring-loaded ball to actually hold the post accurately in position when the wing nut is tightened down is questionable in the first place. It would be sort of a "suggestion" and not a positive stop in any case.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    I already tried some simple stuff to get it set up.

    After that, whenever I need to make something within it's envelope of capability. I only have collets for it up to 6mm, and at the larger sizes I have fewer sizes.

    The pins for the drawers were just a bit over it's capability, as the stock was 9.5mm. Otherwise it could have made its own drawer pins.

    Last time I used it before this upgrade, was to trim up a float valve plunger that had a groove in it. The plunger was not available, and was a really good fit to the Boley work envelope. That had to be done with a graver..

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  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    ...
    Bob E: you can see the drawer guides in the opening. ...
    I gotta' admit - when the post came up & before I read it, I looked for the guides. I dunno' why - I guess to see if there was anything different about the way that you did them.

    Nice job - when will we be seeing it turn?

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Today I decided that if I was going to store the crosslide etc in drawers, I needed to put in drawer stops. So I did.

    I made 4pins which stick through the side of the drawer at the back as far back as possible, 2 per drawer. Originally, I was thinking out how to make a retainer setup to keep them from vibrating out of position and releasing the drawer to fall out.

    Then I decided that I am unlikely to remove the drawer that much. So I drilled the holes slightly undersize, and the wood grips the pins well enough to not be an issue. It was hard to get them into position, and they do not move.

    Works fine.

    If I need to make some sort of retaining setup someday, I will.

    Pins:




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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    I use a DSLR with 50 and 90mm macro lenses which will go to 1:1 but rarely use the autofocus when taking closeups. Manual focus with a central focus indicator light in the viewfinder is often easier than autofocus.
    That works if you have access to a focus control. Basically that is why I want a DSLR. But I don't want it that badly yet. Nothing but auto focus on the three digital cameras here. The Olympus and Rollei are all manual, but not practical for offhand pic taking..

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  • old mart
    replied
    I use a DSLR with 50 and 90mm macro lenses which will go to 1:1 but rarely use the autofocus when taking closeups. Manual focus with a central focus indicator light in the viewfinder is often easier than autofocus.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    And done, at least for the moment. I have some other things that I want to do, but this is good enough for now.

    Drawers with felt.

    Bob E: you can see the drawer guides in the opening. Nothing fancy, but functional. With a candle end rubbed on the sliding portions of the drawers, all is good. I have not decided if I will put on drawer stops to prevent pulling them all the way out. It's a good idea, probably pins or such that can be pulled or turned to allow removal of a drawer if needed.



    The "new" crosslide fits in the drawer nicely


    Everything back in place

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
    Wasn't the color nor the holes. it was the wood veins
    That's plastic..... just like the orange stuff. No matter, it works. Never set up to be a cabinetmaker. Would be OK if the plastic did not have exaggerated fake wood grain.

    Your doors look good

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    Some cupboard doors that I made on my campervan
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 3 photos.

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    Wasn't the color nor the holes. it was the wood veins

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