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Making a rotary vane compressor

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  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    The input manifold is yet another block of steel

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    Milling a deep pocket in steel can be an ordeal in a manual machine especially if the steel is tough.
    I present a method of making a deep pocket that does not require chip removal by high pressure flood coolant.

    In this video I am using:
    - Schaublin SV-51 (1955) Milling machine
    - Solberga (1975) Drill press

    The video is here

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan_the_Chemist
    replied
    Originally posted by FinnoUgric View Post
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    You might have trouble reselling that, even on eBay...

    "CONDITION - USED, some wear, see photo. "
    Last edited by Dan_the_Chemist; 05-27-2022, 08:01 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    The output manifold is just a block of steel with three holes and a recess.

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    Although it is so simple, I manage to make a major mistake with it.
    I am lucky enough to catch the mistake in time and take corrective actions.

    In this video I am using:
    - Schaublin SV-51 (1955) Milling machine
    - Solberga (1975) Drill press


    The video is here

    Leave a comment:


  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    Will this compressor become silent?

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    Air enters and exits the compressor through holes in the cylinder walls.
    I machine flats on cylinder sides and holes for air flow.
    Then I put the thing temporarily together and test it.

    The associated video is here

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Have to say, the intro is “different”

    Leave a comment:


  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    Yet another steel puck for the compressor

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    There will be a precision recess for a shaft seal.
    I will be using my Wohlhaupter UPA3 boring head to make that one.

    The challenge here was to have the recess for the shaft seal accurately placed and dimensioned.

    The associated video is here

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    That's some really cool work. I especially like the last picture

    Leave a comment:


  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    This time it will be the lamelles for the compressor.

    There are 6 of them and they are made out of Uddeholm Vanadis 4 tool steel.
    This steel is quite tough to machine and there are also some challenges with setups.
    I will also get a stopping reminder why safety goggles are a must.


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    The associated video is here

    Leave a comment:


  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    How to make six grooves 3 millimetres wide and 15 millimetres deep?

    You could try to make those with an endmill but since the grooves are 100 millimetres long that would be a major PITA to pull through.
    The obvious answer is, of course, the humble slitting saw.
    Traditionally I have had no luck whatsoever with those and usually I end up collecting slitting saw shrapnel from my floor.
    It will be very exiting to see what is the outcome this time.

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    There is also a video here.

    Leave a comment:


  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    I also don't think a bore that is turned only and not honed will be OK in this application. At least it won't be efficient.
    I think it depends on the material of the lamelles. If the lamelles are made out of something relatively soft material like teflon, it would probably not be a good idea to rub them against anything rougher than a mirror surface.
    In this appliucation, however, the lamelles are made out of some relatively hard material. Definitely harder than the cylinder. There will be oil which futher enhances the sealing. I hope it squirts out more air than oil 😆

    I will be the first person to admit my mistake and bend over to hone that "darn" cylinder when it comes to that. The construction allows it to be done at a later time if need be.

    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    I ain't watchin your videos Finn.
    If I would try to get cheese on top of my sandwiches with my videos, that might offend me. However, I am not trying to be popular or earn money here. I try to be myself with all my mistakes and ever so strange ideas. Most importantly I try to be honest. Internet is alrteady bloated with fake things and I try be a tad different. I actually appreciate Your honesty.
    Last edited by FinnoUgric; 04-06-2022, 11:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by FinnoUgric View Post
    I have now started to make a lamellar air compressor.

    As someone will eventually ask: Why? The answer is simple: Because I want to MAKE it, not to BUY it. I am also oddly obsessed to rotating machinery.
    It will most probably become a semi failed unit but still there will be a lot to learn during making it.
    Very cool!! I like this project... Ill keep watching in silence

    Oh? The vids and animation, no problem. Your post, your content. If someone choses not to learn or watch it that would be their loss, not yours. (you didnt dip into my pocket for loose change while I was watching did you JR

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Appearance is not everything. Quite a few ball bearings I have looked at had finishes in the grooves that "looked" rough and scratched, but the bearings were quite good in operation. So obviously the finish was a lot smoother than it appeared to be!
    Appearance is everything actually. If when light is put on a surface and you see deviations albeit small the surface is not flat and smooth. Maybe you can't feel the ridges with your finger but that isn't really a good test in this application. In my opinion at least. Some of you fellas that are lots smarter than me might disagree maybe but in my Cowboy logic I think it is true. Not a valid comparison between ball bearings and a flat surface in my book. My take on flat and smooth on compressors comes from hands on experience with many vane and screw compressors used in my business in Texas. I also don't think a bore that is turned only and not honed will be OK in this application. At least it won't be efficient.

    I ain't watchin your videos Finn.

    Leave a comment:


  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    This time it is the rotor.

    It is made out of 50 millimetre cold rolled steel.
    There will be precision turning and eliminating the taper.

    In this video I am using:
    - Weiler Matador SV (1972) Lathe

    In the video I have now:
    - cut the crap and done machining
    - chased the donkey to the field while machining

    There is a different way to straighten the taper in a lathe. This one involves tailstock adjustment but the measuring during the adjustment is not done from the tailstock. Instead, the travel deviation is measured. This gives a spoton result on the first try.

    The video is hiding here

    Leave a comment:


  • FinnoUgric
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Humm, I actually liked the animated donkey. I found the verbal descriptions a bit too dragged out. But then, that's me and perhaps others may like that too.

    That looked like a sheet of extra fine sand paper on the mill or drill press table under the end plate. Did you decide to do some lapping after all?
    You have a point in there about the excessive babble vs actual action. Seems I just cannot help myself 😉

    The sealing surfacess could be lapped for perfect match and thus avoid usage of some sealing compound. I quess I end up using sealing compound (Permatex Form-A-Gasket).

    After some thought over the sealing of the lamelles it has become clear to me that the lamelles cannot be made really airtight. However, since the pump is so to say flooded with oil which has the same pressure with the compressed air, the oil takes care of sealing. I think this same principle is also used in the Hydrovane pump. The seal between the rotor and the vanes must be tight enough to not to flood the pump too much which could result in hydraulic lock.


    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Humm, I actually liked the animated donkey. I found the verbal descriptions a bit too dragged out. But then, that's me and perhaps others may like that too.

    That looked like a sheet of extra fine sand paper on the mill or drill press table under the end plate. Did you decide to do some lapping after all?

    Leave a comment:

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