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  • What Would These Be Good For

    What the heck are these good for. They were free. I know what they were originally sold for. Polishing carbide saw teeth after sharpening. I just want to know if there is any real world other thing they would be fantastic for.

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    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  • #2
    I thought it was cute they are labeled as 4 inch and 10mm arbor on the same label.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #3
      Wouldn't they be ideal for touching up any carbide lathe tooling you might have? Boring bars come to mind.
      I "sharpen" carbide turning tools frequently. Even inserts. Some materials respond well to a keen edge.

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      • #4
        It says right on them "4" emery blade". Which makes almost no sense.....

        If emery, they won't do much with carbide, although they will slowly wear it away. (Maybe that is equal to "polishing"?)

        And why "blade"?

        With that odd information on them, and the note at the bottom that appears to say "made in china", the answer to "what would these be good for?" might be "Not much!", or "you can't be sure, even the makers don't know what they really are".

        Actually, they may be good for anything that somewhat impure aluminum oxide would be useful in sharpening, etc. The shape would work for a number of different cutters, such as sharpening form tools like gear cutters, etc for horizontal mills.
        4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

        CNC machines only go through the motions

        "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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        • #5
          I was going to say the same. It might be able to abrade the carbide just enough to knock off the high spots from the diamond wheel as like a secondary op. Seems like a pain in the butt though. Think I'd rather just have a finer diamond wheel though.

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          • #6
            They would be good for shrpening HSS gear hob cutters. I have a couple similar.
            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
            Monarch 10EE 1942

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            • #7
              Originally posted by eKretz View Post
              I was going to say the same. It might be able to abrade the carbide just enough to knock off the high spots from the diamond wheel as like a secondary op. Seems like a pain in the butt though. Think I'd rather just have a finer diamond wheel though.
              Yeah, but they were free... LOL!

              Seriously I've got two diamond wheels for the T&C grinder, and if a tool needs touch up on the edge I usually use a fine and very fine diamond bench stone.
              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

              Comment


              • #8
                Polishing tig tungsten's? No idea, just throwing out guesses. Try some on a variety of metals of differing hardness and see how they work.

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                • #9
                  If they are 45 degree angle Mighta been able to recently use one on the mill to grind my valves on the pea-shooter and save a step from having to throw the head down,

                  but second thought they would have had to be trued up to perfection anyways,

                  Yup - used the mill to grind stuff, bought it to be able to use for just about anything and that I do...


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                  • #10
                    Set your flower pots on top of them.

                    -D
                    DZER

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                      Polishing tig tungsten's? No idea, just throwing out guesses. Try some on a variety of metals of differing hardness and see how they work.
                      I Googled the numbers on the disc and found a few references to people using them for this.

                      Ive never had a problem using whatever grinding wheel or belt sander was around for sharpening tungsten so I don’t think I would go out of my way to get them for this purpose but I wouldn’t be afraid to try it if I had them.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by oxford View Post

                        Ive never had a problem using whatever grinding wheel or belt sander was around for sharpening tungsten
                        Exactly --- your not trying to melt the stuff (which is it's strong point of resisting it) your just trying to sharpen it, you can actually use a side walk if you have too...

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                        • #13
                          Chichago Electric, was this ever a real name? I know that it is common for old European and USA factories to resort to badge engineering, but do they have a catalogue?

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                          • #14
                            They are the Harborfreight saw sharpener. it comes with a Diamond wheel and a emery wheel like that shown.

                            https://www.harborfreight.com/replac...harpener-98862

                            https://www.harborfreight.com/120-vo...ner-96687.html

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                            • #15
                              Chicago Electric is a Harbor Freight trade name trying to sound like something else.

                              Its like the Central Pneumatic (meh!) name they use to try and sound like Chicago Pneumatic (good stuff).

                              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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