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Combination Lathe/Mill Upgrades and improvements

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  • #31
    I have no experience with the combination machine you have, so cannot comment directly
    . Over the years we, at Toronto Society of Model Engineers have seen some very good models built on combination machines.
    Those folk using them have commented that they need to plan carefully so that they do not waste time changing from one mode to another.
    The results obtained, as with almost every machine, depend almost entirely on the patience, skill and determination of the user and not primarily with the quality of the machine.
    When you reach the stage that you can do good work, while at the same time realising how much easier it would be to get the same results with less effort if you had better, larger or different tools then is perhaps the time to consider upgrading.
    I have a second shop at our cottage,it is very small and I have bought a second hand combination machine( Maximat 7 )which will fit the space I have to use there. I hope I will enjoy it.
    Regards David Powell,

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

      Maybe you do.
      Nah, I am grounded in reality, even if that means
      being a bit more depressed about it.

      -D
      DZER

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      • #33
        Originally posted by David T View Post

        I would love to see and hear about what you have done. Looking forward to it.
        OK, We will start with the tool post. I just had a look and I didn't take any picture when I installed the AXA tool post. I need to run into town for a little while. When I get back I will take pictures of the mounting and get some dimensions also. I am pretty sure my AXA came from Accusize and I went for the wedge type. You are lucky being in Ontario. When I place an order and Canada post has to bring it all the way out here to Vancouver Island it can take a week or more.
        Larry - west coast of Canada

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        • #34
          Nah, I am grounded in reality, even if that means
          being a bit more depressed about it.
          You may want to read Allie Brosh's "Solutions and other problems". Simultaneously hilarious, insightful, and depressing.
          "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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          • #35
            I don't like conflicting emotions.
            I am a man.

            -D
            DZER

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Doozer View Post

              Nah, I am grounded in reality, ...
              -D
              Self proclaimed "grounded in reality" is suspicious. Suggests that the proclaimer is kidding himself & proclaiming a desired attribute. "Grounded in reality" is much more credible coming from an outside observer.

              Telling it as I sees it.

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              • #37
                Back again. The tool post spacer I made is 2 3/4' square and .878 thick. I made a long T nut to clamp it to the slot in the vise. You will see that I also milled a slot in the bottom of the spacer for a key to ride in the vise slot. This prevents the spacer from turning when you rotate the post. You will also see that I screwed and loctited the stud into the T nut then milled the sides away to match the width of the top of the T slot. The stud supplied is too short for this arrangement so I made a longer one. Probably from a long bolt, don't remember. This setup has worked well for me.

                I also - Modified a digital vernier for a tail stock DRO, Made a quill stop and mounted an Igaging DRO on the mill, Made a carriage stop that will accommodate a dial indicator, switched to link type belts to decrease vibration, put extra clamp bolt on mill motor mount to decrease vibration, made lever type lathe belt tightener so I could get it started with the belts set for highest speed, made new longer cross slide nut that also fit the threads better and cuts down on the wear. That's all I can think of right now. Over time I have pretty much had every part of this machine apart for one reason or another.
                You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
                Larry - west coast of Canada

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                • #38
                  I'd take a sledgehammer and separate the two

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                    Self proclaimed "grounded in reality" is suspicious. Suggests that the proclaimer is kidding himself & proclaiming a desired attribute. "Grounded in reality" is much more credible coming from an outside observer.

                    Telling it as I sees it.
                    But it's hard to get an expert opinion.
                    Hence why I talk to myself so much.

                    -D
                    DZER

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                      Self proclaimed "grounded in reality" is suspicious. Suggests that the proclaimer is kidding himself & proclaiming a desired attribute. "Grounded in reality" is much more credible coming from an outside observer.

                      Telling it as I sees it.
                      What reality? Whose reality?

                      My reality is that I'd be looking around already with the idea to move that machine onward and replace it. There comes a point where the effort to improve a machine you don't really want to keep becomes unrewarding.

                      I've been at the "I have this and may as well improve it to where I like it" place before. I learned to avoid it. It's the old "sunk cost" argument, that leads to throwing good money after bad. The OP may be free of some of that, since he was given the machine I believe.... For no, or small cost, it's not at all bad. It's not a "keeper" IMO, it seems that most owners want to move on after a while.

                      It's the OP's choice, but the prospective next owner probably won't value what you did, and may even want to pay less on account of what you consider to be "improvements". That really suggests not doing or buying anything to go with the machine that cannot be taken off and moved to the replacement.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                        But it's hard to get an expert opinion.
                        Hence why I talk to myself so much.

                        -D
                        I KNOW ! ! ! Folks accuse me of talking to myself too often. I just tell them that it's the only way I get any sensible answers ! ! !
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                          Nah, I am grounded in reality, even if that means
                          being a bit more depressed about it.

                          -D
                          Doozer... you have been very kind on this post. Normally... I think you would have said buy a real machine...... then think about a tool holder ??

                          Welcome David to this site! I have machines like yours, and do well making home projects. You are a good fit for the " Home shop machinist" / commercial boys. My last big project was the James Webb telescope. Now its mower blades ,fences and this forum?? Lots of very experienced fellows here, so hang in and learn from them.

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