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Brian builds a Corliss

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  • I would get what they call gun taps or spiral point taps, 2 names for the same thing. Those are the best cutting taps, and pretty strong as well.
    Kansas City area

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    • Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
      I would get what they call gun taps or spiral point taps, 2 names for the same thing. Those are the best cutting taps, and pretty strong as well.
      X2 on that Toolguy,after using these Taps will probably never buy another Hand Tap ever,have used Spiral Point&Spiral Flute Taps by hand also.

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      • Yes, they both work fine by hand or machine. Spiral FLUTE taps, for blind holes break a lot easier. You have to make sure not to bottom them out. That's the same with any tap, though. Spiral POINT taps work best in a blind hole that's deep enough for the chips to not pack up, but made for through holes.
        Last edited by Toolguy; 03-05-2022, 07:14 PM.
        Kansas City area

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        • Today was one of those seriously bad "Everything I done turned to poop" kind of days. I managed to drill four holes (well, actually only two show) holes in the wrong place and managed to break a #4 tap and a #5 tap off. I did manage to get everything I have made so far mounted to the baseplate. i don't have days like this very often, but man, when I do I really do!!!
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • Today I picked up my shoulder bolts from my friend who can still order thru McMaster-Carr. They look tiny, and they are, but they should do the job just fine. I also picked up a 2 1/2" square piece of A36 mild steel x 2 5/8" long, and milled it down to 2 1/8" square. I don't get a really spectacular finishes from my face mill, and I guess it must be time to turn the carbides to present another face to the work. I left the material a bit over length, because I get really good finishes with my lathe, and the cylinder has to be set up in the four jaw chuck to drill and bore the 1 1/8" thru hole, so I will finish it to length in the lathe.

            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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            • Not surprised you have trouble getting a good finish with A36 steel. A36 is mostly used for structural use, I beams, angle iron, making bridges etc. Its actually a poor choice for machining parts like you make.

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              • Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
                Not surprised you have trouble getting a good finish with A36 steel. A36 is mostly used for structural use, I beams, angle iron, making bridges etc. Its actually a poor choice for machining parts like you make.
                A-36 isn't even a "material"..... it's a specification. Anything that meets spec is OK as "A-36". So you have only a limited knowledge of what you have when you have a block of it sitting in front of you.
                CNC machines only go through the motions

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                • Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                  A-36 isn't even a "material"..... it's a specification. Anything that meets spec is OK as "A-36". So you have only a limited knowledge of what you have when you have a block of it sitting in front of you.
                  I'm pretty sure we all know what A36 means, a hot rolled mild steel, I am an internet troll, and I'm calling you out on this troll post.

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                  • Today I'm really starting to miss my lathe. I'm at the point where almost everything I have left to do requires some lathe work. I have been looking up info on how to tap holes without breaking a tap. This one as described in a video by Joe Pi comes highly recommended, and should be used with a spring loaded tap driver in the mill spindle.
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                    • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                      Today I'm really starting to miss my lathe. I'm at the point where almost everything I have left to do requires some lathe work. I have been looking up info on how to tap holes without breaking a tap. This one as described in a video by Joe Pi comes highly recommended, and should be used with a spring loaded tap driver in the mill spindle.
                      I have had good luck just hand balming the die in my drill press chuck for finicky jobs if I am worried about breaking off a tap. Anything to keep it square will work including your mill.
                      1/4 to half turn forward and a 1/4 back to break the chips, and lots of oil too of course.

                      Good luck!
                      Jon

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                      • Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                        I'm pretty sure we all know what A36 means, a hot rolled mild steel, I am an internet troll, and I'm calling you out on this troll post.
                        Ok, so what?

                        Point is that there is no reason to expect three pieces of it to be the same, unless you just cut them from one. Much of it machines like crap. The only thing worse is rebar.

                        I'll be interested to see what finish the lathe puts on it..... might get lucky, might not. Far better to get something with a known composition.

                        And, no, NOT everyone knows that.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions

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                        • Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                          Ok, so what?

                          Point is that there is no reason to expect three pieces of it to be the same, unless you just cut them from one. Much of it machines like crap. The only thing worse is rebar.

                          I'll be interested to see what finish the lathe puts on it..... might get lucky, might not. Far better to get something with a known composition.

                          And, no, NOT everyone knows that.
                          I agree. I have gotten really good finishes on hot roll with a carbide indexable endmill, but I wouldn't base a product on it or have long term expectations of having every batch do the same.
                          For Brian's purpose, let's hope he gets the finish he desires.

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                          • Today I'm in design mode. Looking at making up a welding jig for the flywheel. I can mount my face-plate on the lathe, and make a center hole plug that is bored to be a precise fit into the faceplate center hole, with a precise center hole in the center plug which will accept the hub of the flywheel and center it. (I will leave the hub full diameter and about 3" long on that side only) I can use elements from my clamping kit for the mill to hold the outer rim of the flywheel firmly against the face of the faceplate and still allow access for my dial gauge to precisely center the outer rim before clamping it. The spokes are then slid thru holes in the flywheel rim and into blind pockets in the hub. In fact, at this time the spokes can be loctited into the blind holes in the hub. The spokes are sized so that when seated and Loctited into the blind holes in the hub, they are about 0.100" shy of the flywheel outer diameter. After 24 hours set up time, the faceplate gets unbolted form the lathe and taken out into my welding shop where the ends of the spokes are tig welded into the flywheel rim and any remaining depression in the hole gets filled with tig weld. Then the set up is dismantled and then the extra long hub which was previously held in the brown center plug gets mounted in the 3 jaw chuck and the o.d. of the flywheel gets turned very lightly to smooth the welded areas. Then with my reverse jaws in the lathe chuck, I hold the o.d. of the flywheel rim and finish turning and boring the hub center hole.
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • Sounds like a good plan to me.
                              Larry - west coast of Canada

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                              • Having a quiet day today, cleaning up tiny bits that are outstanding. Today I ran into that age old conundrum "I designed it this way, but I can't make it on my machinery, so I'll redesign it to what my machines can make." Those small links with the series of holes in them were going to be totally different, but I had no really good way to cut the large radius required, so they ended up with parallel sides and some cosmetic holes in them. I have a serious bunch of rounding off to do, but all in all I'm happy with the way they are turning out.--And these are the smallest parts that I have to make. I heard back this morning from the people who are fixing my lathe, and it's not going to be cheap. It's going to cost around $700 to fix, but that's a lot cheaper than buying another lathe. Maybe tomorrow I will set up my rotary table and round off all the ends of the links in the picture.
                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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