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Brian builds a Corliss

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  • Come on guys. We all know Sid is a perfectionist, and that is just fine as it is HIS profile. Brian does amazing work from design to finished running models. I wish I had .1 of Brians resolve and talent for this type of work. Like JT said above, Brians opinion is the ONLY one that counts in the end. The oops was pointed out and Brian answered the suggestion. That SHOULD be the end of it. Brian will see the end result and if he is not happy he will address it then as he has on so many other projects in the past. Let it be!!!!!!!!!
    Robin

    Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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    • Originally posted by rdfeil View Post
      Come on guys. We all know Sid is a perfectionist
      There is a difference in being a perfectionist and taking a little pride in what you are doing.

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      • Question, Brian, if you do end up shortening those cap screws, how will you do it? I figure they are to hard to shear in a cheap clipper tool, so lathe, Dremel, something else? Just curious...... Also, Wonderful work as always!
        Robin

        Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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        • Originally posted by rdfeil View Post
          Question, Brian, if you do end up shortening those cap screws, how will you do it? I figure they are to hard to shear in a cheap clipper tool, so lathe, Dremel, something else? Just curious...... Also, Wonderful work as always!
          This is how I would do this, make this jig from round stock, chuck it in the lathe, face to length, bevel.
          Click image for larger version

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          • McMaster has #4-40 SHCS length 3/16" to 3/8" for $10/100. Seems like a no brainer.

            https://www.mcmaster.com/miniature-c...head-screws-8/

            Amazon has packs of 25 pieces of #4-40 x 1/4" for $5:

            https://www.amazon.com/Prime-Line-91...ps%2C80&sr=1-3
            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
            USA Maryland 21030

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            • I use a similar method as RB211 but I thread the bore and put a set screw in against the bolt head to keep it from screwing back in when I start to machine off the outer end. I have a container with a number of them in now , mostly machine screw sizes and some small metric. Recently I started marking them with a vibrating engraver so I know what size and thread they are.
              Larry - west coast of Canada

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              • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                Block isn't full size--Lacks about 1/32" of being full size. No do-over. Bolt head will cover elongated slot and Mrs. belt sander will get rid of any overhanging brass.
                Attach a 1/32" thick name plate on that side... VIOLA... perfectly fitted brass plates.

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                • To shorten a 1/2" shcs to 1/4" long I tap a hole thru a 1/4" piece of flat-bar, run the screw in until the head bottoms out, then remove anything sticking out the other side on my beltsander.
                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                  • Today I have very little to show---but I did do some work. I machined the piston rod, and I machined the cross head. I have found from experience that two parts that are joined together with a thread, that are supposed to end up concentric to each other, seldom are. To give me a better chance of concentricity, I hold one part in the lathes 3 jaw chuck, and one piece in the tailstock chuck, give a good application of 638 Loctite, screw them together, and leave it to cure overnight. The cross-head is marginally over-diameter. Tomorrow I will hold the piston rod in my lathes 3 jaw and carefully machine the cross-head until it is a smooth sliding fit into the cross-head guide.
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                    • Today it was back to "one part a day" mode. I had time to make my piston, and then got a call from a customer for design of a robot end effector to pick up aluminum roll bars for hydroforming. I might make the gland which screws into the rod end of the cylinder tonight if I have any energy left.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • Today we have something new--for me anyways. Turning a taper using the top slide. I haven't done this before, and it works well, even if it is a bit tense. Being very, very careful that the turning rectangular end of the con rod doesn't hit the toolpost. I'm almost finished this first end of the con rod. I got to hold one end in the chuck for this first end. I have drilled both ends of the blank for a center, so the second end will be turned between centers with a lathe dog.
                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                        • This is the set-up for turning the second half of the tapered con-rod, complete with lathe dog.---And no, a pig doesn't live in my lathe but sometimes it shore looks that way. I do clean up between engines.
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                          • The con rod is finished except for some final sanding. The piston is finished. There is a lot of work in that connecting rod!!!
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • There is a lot of work in that connecting rod!!!

                              Yes, there is. Just finished the one for my Stuart Beam project. There’s a photo in the what did you do today thread, if you’re curious.





                              I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                              Oregon, USA

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                              • I see a whole bunch of operations in that part!
                                CNC machines only go through the motions

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