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Brian builds a Corliss

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  • #16
    Probably I will go with a 1/2" thick baseplate supported by four legs (which I haven't shown yet). This will let me keep most of the mechanical components the same as originally designed on the MEM website.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #17
      Why is the rim of the flywheel notched with gear teeth?
      Allan Ostling

      Phoenix, Arizona

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      • #18
        Usually, that would be for baring the engine off top or bottom dead center.
        not really gear tooth, Per se.

        Sid

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Doozer View Post

          How about a woman who was in a hatchet fight, and she didn't have a hatchet ? ? ?

          -D
          Nah.
          'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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          • #20
            Originally posted by aostling View Post
            Why is the rim of the flywheel notched with gear teeth?
            As Sid has said, they are for barring the engine round to get it to a point where it will start, i'e; not at the extreme end of a stroke, if thats where it stopped, Shape of them varied. on a small engine they could be just pockets to take the end of a large crow bar (Hence 'barring') On larger engines there would be a barring engine, a small steam engine, usually two cylinders, with a worm drive finishing with a pinion which could be engaged with teeth on the flywheel to turn it round. Tooth shape tended to be fairly stubby.
            'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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            • #21
              We have a 250 Hp Corliss engine at the Buckley. MI show grounds, it runs all during the show. Always the 3rd w/e in August.

              Brian,
              How thick (wide) does the flywheel have to be? I have lots of aluminum of various sizes and thicknesses, courtesy of my weekly shopping trips to the scrapyard. I could maybe even come up with a hunk of 7 1/2" diameter steel.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post

                As Sid has said, they are for barring the engine round to get it to a point where it will start,
                That is encouraging. It implies that the plans may be a scaled version of an original Corliss engine, with all the details.

                I can't help wondering, though: what are the odds that these notches will survive as a feature of this build? (Only Brian can answer that).

                On another note, I have a textbook which belonged to my father. Steam Engine Theory and Practice, by William Ripper. This was for ME 1695, a course he took at the University of Washington in 1935. It has a chapter on the Corliss engine. This states that the engine was introduced by the American engineer Geo. H. Corliss in 1850. The author lists the advantages of the engine, but adds only one caveat:.
                .
                .
                One important objection to the Corliss valve gear is the limitation of the speed of rotation of engines fitted with it owing to its action being dependent upon the engagement of and tripping of catches. about 150 [RPM] is probably the limit (though speeds as high as 240 [RPM] are known in America. To avoid this limitation, the valve gear is now made for high speeds without the trip-gear, the connection between the wrist-plate and the steam-admission valve being direct, and the regulation of the cut-off being obtained by varying the travel of the wrist-plate motion through a governor and link.




                So, presumably the governor is an indication that this design will have no such limitations. Let 'er rip, Bryan!

                Allan Ostling

                Phoenix, Arizona

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                • #23
                  Hi JDunmyer--Haven't heard from you in a long time. In a perfect world, the flywheel would be 7 1/4" o.d. and 6 1/2" i.d. x 1 1/2" long. Aluminum would be too light. It has to be steel, iron, or bronze or brass.---Brian
                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                  • #24
                    Brian- didn’t you get a flywheel from Martin Model before?
                    I’m sure they’d have one that would look good and function well. Save you some time.
                    I think they look a lot closer to the prototype than something your going to build up.

                    Sid

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                    • #25
                      Yes, I have bought from them before. They make good flywheels. I would rather make my own flywheel, but it all comes down to material cost. Remember, up here in the land of the Polar bear, I end up paying essentially twice what these things are listed for in the States.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • #26
                        I have went thru all of the solid models and mated them correctly, and I must say, they are done very good. I haven't found any errors and everything fits where it should. I don't think I'm going to bother with the governor, and I will stick as closely as I can to what has already been done. Some of the smaller connecting pins may be different, but as for all the large components, I see no reason to change them.
                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                          How about a woman who was in a hatchet fight, and she didn't have a hatchet ? ? ?

                          -D
                          Seen some videos of that over on r/makemycoffin , not even close to the absolute worst I've seen over there.

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                          • #28
                            Brian
                            It doesn't show on your drawing but most of those Corliss engines (in the UK at least) had multiple Vee groves on the flywheel, and drove a countershaft with cotton ropes.
                            'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by jdunmyer View Post
                              We have a 250 Hp Corliss engine at the Buckley. MI show grounds, it runs all during the show. Always the 3rd w/e in August.

                              Brian,
                              How thick (wide) does the flywheel have to be? I have lots of aluminum of various sizes and thicknesses, courtesy of my weekly shopping trips to the scrapyard. I could maybe even come up with a hunk of 7 1/2" diameter steel.
                              Section of schedule 80 pipe and weld the spokes in between the rim and hub.
                              A chance to practice your TIG skills.

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                              • #30
                                That was my plan Reggie-obe. Actually thought I might drill thru the pipe and make the length of the spokes so they came 0.100" shy of the outer diameter and fill the remaining area with tig weld, then take a skim pass on the o.d. to true it up.
                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                                Comment

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