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Brian builds a Corliss

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  • They're like router roundover bits, just for metal. I think I paid about $80 for these about 10 years ago, and as you can see by the dust I haven't used them in a while, as I just use the CNC now, but they're handy when you need them. This reminds me I should bring them home as I'd probably use them more there. Along with half the other tools in my box lol.

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    • rounding the end of the part like in the last drawing above: When I really care, RT like Brian suggests. If more expediency is required, hang it on a rod across the vise jaws (only need be straight and smaller than the bore), cut a bunch of facets, then clean with a file. Super fast and looks fairly good.
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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      • Okay--I do have one of them. I sometimes use it to put radiused corners on engine baseplates. Thank you.---Brian
        Brian Rupnow
        Design engineer
        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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        • Get various sizes and use them more often!
          Rotary table works too, but these are probably quicker, and on some pieces the only way to make a consistent radius.

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          • Router bits are cheap and easily available. I've used them successfully on aluminum. There are many radii available.

            -js
            There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

            Location: SF Bay Area

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            • I use every kind of carbide router bits made for wood, on steel, alum., plastic, even wood sometimes! If you don't try to hog with them, they hold up for a long time, even on steel. They are cheaper and cut cleaner than the ones made for metal.
              Kansas City area

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              • Every day I try to do a little bit. Today I worked on levers and linkages. I also had a great idea for rounding off the ends of levers, etcetera, but it's one of those things that I need my lathe for.
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                • I've almost reached a point where there aren't many things left to build before I get my lathe back. If I run out of things to make without the lathe, I will start the cylinder block.
                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                  • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                    I've almost reached a point where there aren't many things left to build before I get my lathe back.
                    They haven't called you with a repair estimate and you haven't called them to ask: why it's blown-up twice; if they are going to fix it for free?

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                    • No hope of a free fix. Warranty is only one year from date of purchase. The last time I took that lathe to Toronto, it was my own fault. The safety switch on the door over the gears had come loose and I had forgotten that there was even a safety switch there. They haven't called yet with an estimate, but whatever it is I will pay it. It has to be cheaper than the $5000 I paid for the lathe.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • I decided that I really needed to build a wooden base to do this right. The base will be made from 2" x 3/4" pine and will be stained a medium dark brown color and clear-coated. This gets the flywheel about 1/4" above the underside of the wooden base for it to clear the table-top.
                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                          I decided that I really needed to build a wooden base to do this right. The base will be made from 2" x 3/4" pine and will be stained a medium dark brown color and clear-coated. This gets the flywheel about 1/4" above the underside of the wooden base for it to clear the table-top.
                          A scale brick base would look really nice too

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                          • Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                            A scale brick base would look really nice too
                            True, but then you'd have to make a scale brick mold, and mini trowels.

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                            • No, I don't do bricks. I very seldom make up wooden bases or paint them either. I like the look of bare metal where I can get away with it. I've tried modelling a few different bases for this engine, but the wooden skirt all around it looks best to me.
                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                              • Today I am sorely done up with arthritis. I do take medicine for it, but the day before a rain storm is coming I suffer like Hell!!! I did however, make my engine part for today. This wasn't as big a job as you might think. I designed the base to be made from 6" x 1/2" aluminum bar, so all I really did was cut it to length and cut that big rectangular hole for the flywheel to fit into. I think that on Monday I'm going to start on the big cube that becomes the cylinder. I will be making it from mild steel, and it will have about a zillion #4-40 holes tapped into it. My machinery handbook suggests that the largest tap drill I can use is 0.095" diameter and the actual body of a #4-40 bolt is 0.110" diameter. That doesn't allow for a lot of thread engagement, but then again I'm not going to be towing trucks with this cylinder, and I'm really concerned about breaking taps. I will probably go to my tool supplier and buy four drills and four new taps just for this job.
                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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