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OT: Does Polyester resin chemically bond with ABS? Repairing roof cargo pod

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  • OT: Does Polyester resin chemically bond with ABS? Repairing roof cargo pod

    So, if any of you remember the adventures of my son the itinerant climbing guide, he cracked his gigantic roof pod badly yesterday in a Vermont parking garage. Hence a call to dad. Luckily he was already planning to swing home for a few days.

    I didn't think for a minute welding it with heat or glue would hold up. My 1st plan is to make a big patch on the inside using polyester resin with 3 layers of glass, 2 fabric with a layer of mat between after cleaning and roughing it good. The question is how good is the bond. Google is all over the place on this one. It seems possible the esters and MEK actually will act as a solvent cement and get a great bond. Dunno. The 'belt and suspenders' plan would be to use pop rivets along the cracks to mechanically fasten the ABS to the glass shell inside.

    Any comments or advice? Once he heads out again this really needs to work!

    Click image for larger version

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    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

  • #2
    ABS solvents bonds quite well. Why not get some ABS sheet and lap bond it over the cracks?

    Mike

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MikeL46 View Post
      ABS solvents bonds quite well. Why not get some ABS sheet and lap bond it over the cracks?

      Mike
      I guess because I trust fiberglass more. That compound crack is such a mess! The surfaces are all curved and trying to clamp a sheet tight while solvent cementing it seems a rough go. I guess a bunch of strips would work but it still seems sketchy compared to glassing the whole inside of the damn thing.
      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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      • #4
        I've tried my hand at plastic welding a couple of times. So I fully understand your thinking. But to be fair those with more skill at it can do a great job. I've seen examples and they looked good.

        But the next thought is that if the plastic here really is ABS then I'd say go with the ABS glue and internal ABS patches. After all, have you tried to break apart an ABS pipe joint in plumbing? It's welded pretty nicely together. And the fact that one can rub some of the cement around on the plastic and see traces of the base plastic dissolving into the cement from the colors flowing is proof that it's joining with a proper chemical weld.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
          I've tried my hand at plastic welding a couple of times. So I fully understand your thinking. But to be fair those with more skill at it can do a great job. I've seen examples and they looked good.

          But the next thought is that if the plastic here really is ABS then I'd say go with the ABS glue and internal ABS patches. After all, have you tried to break apart an ABS pipe joint in plumbing? It's welded pretty nicely together. And the fact that one can rub some of the cement around on the plastic and see traces of the base plastic dissolving into the cement from the colors flowing is proof that it's joining with a proper chemical weld.
          I've got a hot air plastic welder and used it for polyethylene, but never ABS, which the Yakima website says is the material. Alright, I guess I'll consider ABS glue and sheet. Is there a place to pick up ABS sheet besides McMaster? Anything made of it at HD or Lowes?
          Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gellfex View Post

            I've got a hot air plastic welder and used it for polyethylene, but never ABS, which the Yakima website says is the material. Alright, I guess I'll consider ABS glue and sheet. Is there a place to pick up ABS sheet besides McMaster? Anything made of it at HD or Lowes?
            If they haven't gone T.U. from loss of business due to Covid, Grewe Plastics on the outskirts of Newark, NJ.

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            • #7
              Home Depot or Lowe’s should have ABS pipe. Cut it along the length, heat it up and make it a sheet. Get whatever diameter you need for the biggest size piece you need.

              I would get the sheet hot and form it the the shape you need and then glue it in place.

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              • #8
                Search for bumper repair kits with the z bend hot melt steel inserts.

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                • #9
                  Maybe the option you were hoping for is to surface prep the abs so the polyester will stick. I think there's a surface prep available for abs- I know there is one for pvc. I'd be inclined to do an experiment- catalyze a small quantity of resin, then mix in some of that prep. Or prepare the resin, then brush the surface prep on the abs and then the resin almost right away. Lay a bit of cloth into the wetted surface of the abs scrap and see what happens.

                  As you know, laying fiberglass and resin will conform to whatever shape intimately. You may not get that same intimate contact by trying to form abs onto an existing curved surface. This would likely mean that you won't get the strong bond that you'd hope for. I presume this would need to be leakproof as well, so that compounds the problem. I think a bit of experimenting is in order.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    darryl yes, all of that is why I was thinking fiberglass. I was planning to try a straight up shot of resin on ABS test tomorrow to see how adhesion was without anything. Maybe I'll try that and a test with using some of the ABS pipe primer just before to soften it.
                    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                    • #11
                      Avoid polyester resin--use epoxy.
                      12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                      Index "Super 55" mill
                      18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                      7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                      24" State disc sander

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by oxford View Post
                        Home Depot or Lowe’s should have ABS pipe. Cut it along the length, heat it up and make it a sheet. Get whatever diameter you need for the biggest size piece you need.

                        I would get the sheet hot and form it the the shape you need and then glue it in place.
                        ABS pipe? That would depend on if ABS is in common use locally or not.
                        Not in HD or Lowes in NJ.
                        Last edited by reggie_obe; 02-27-2022, 12:27 AM.

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                        • #13
                          ABS is used for drain pipe, not pressure pipe. Makes a difference where to look.

                          How about with the fiberglas, but using the ABS glue, or ABS dissolved in solvent in place of the resin?
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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                          • #14
                            Acetone will bond ABS to ABS as strong or stronger than original.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ezduzit View Post
                              Avoid polyester resin--use epoxy.
                              Becuz.....?
                              Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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