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  • #16
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

    Dang Willy - yeah it's a good thing they made a "law" any crack-ups for the 8 years?

    That is way beyond anything iv ever done...
    No issues or incidents, mostly due to perseverance, and diligence in safe practices because it has kept me and others alive, and oh yeah, sometimes a whole lot of luck.
    I did regional fuel and chemical transport for quite a long time after the long hauls. The importance of following safe practices were ingrained by that point and helped a lot in getting everyone home.

    Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
    42 hours straight, unbroken driving and plowing in a blizzard and cleanup.
    I was young then.
    As you may know I worked highways maintenance too for about 13 years near the end of my tenure in the transportation industry and know how exhausting plowing snow can be.
    This has got to some of the most mentally intense work I've done, don't think I could have done a 42 hr shift.
    Not bad enough that there are a lot of hidden treasures underneath the snow, it's people in cars and trucks that scare the daylights out of me.
    I'd rather lowbed a D8 down a steep ice covered mountain logging road when it's raining, I know what to expect there and deal with it before it happens.


    Originally posted by alanganes View Post



    I hear this. I worked for near 10 years supporting a large scale medical system in various places around the country. These systems treated very sick people so when the system went down it was a very big deal. Outside of the unexpected problems there were preventative maintenance projects that had to be done every 18 months or so that would take a system off line for 5-7 days. Once you set the project in motion, you pretty much worked around the clock until it was back on line. The team was never big enough to have multiple fully staffed shifts, so you worked 16-18 hours straight, went back to your hotel and slept for a bit and then got back on it. The really difficult part was that during the final phases of the project, the process sort of dictated who got to sleep and when, so not only did you not get enough sleep, it was often badly timed.

    And that was for the planned and somewhat controlled stuff. Unexpected failures were an entirely different can of worms and were totally unpredictable. More than a few instances where I went into the office here and by 10AM found out I had to be on a plane someplace before the day was out. Then it was all too often a 3 day trip that stretched to two weeks or more.

    I don't regret the work I did there and as you say Willy, the sense of accomplishment was large. I changed jobs a little over a year ago to where I am largely working 40 hour weeks. No calls in the middle of the night, no work on weekends or holidays, no trips out of town, etc. Working 40 hour weeks and being home every night feels almost like cheating.
    My hat's off to you, you knew your role was a vital one and you made personal sacrifices in order to see the goal completed. Not always easy and the hours have a way of eating away at you but it does build character and an immense sense of worth, and in more than just the monetary aspect alone. The intangible side of life now has more meaning and a greater sense of importance.

    I'm sure there are many others here that have put in some very long and arduous hours, not fun at the time but it does build wisdom and appreciation.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

    Location: British Columbia

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    • #17
      Well I blew up $7K of Yaskawa Servo Drives this week. Would have been nice to have an asterisk or somthing to indicate that these are the only two pins on a 50 pin connectors that can’t be fed 24vdc. Afterwards I found the note on page 137 of the 647 page manual that mentions this.

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      • #18
        Just when you think you have it bad, someone has it worse.

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        • #19
          Good folks here. My longest "shift" was 37 hours straight. Used to do 126-130 hour work weeks on the farm. Run the tractor from the crack of dawn until about 11 PM, then fix whatever got torn up that day, maybe sleep a couple hours, then right back at it the next morning. A little easier to do when you've got someone bringing you food, though. Nowadays, I've got to factor in time to find or prepare meals, do the laundry, keep up the house, drive back and forth between home and work, etc. Plus I guess I'm getting old and lazy; I still do 16 hour days, but I try to limit total hours per week to 80 or less, ideally 60. Now I'm salaried and don't get jack for working over time, anyway.

          People look at me like I'm mad when I tell them I drive from NH to MO in a single day (22 hour drive) or that I was at work for 18 hours straight. Nice to see folks on here have "been there done that".

          Always thought there were a lot of unsung heroes out there in the public works / utilities segments. Had a friend back in Indiana who was a lineman. When the weather was bad, he'd be climbing poles for 24+ hours straight. Kind of like QSMIDO - really long, hard work so that the rest of us can have electricity, running water, safe roads, etc. Really incredible how fortunate we are.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
            Good folks here. My longest "shift" was 37 hours straight.
            Always thought there were a lot of unsung heroes out there in the public works / utilities segments. Had a friend back in Indiana who was a lineman. When the weather was bad, he'd be climbing poles for 24+ hours straight. Kind of like QSMIDO - really long, hard work so that the rest of us can have electricity, running water, safe roads, etc. Really incredible how fortunate we are.
            My Dad was a Line man. For Edison's poles I think. He was very good at what he did. I git the climbing spikes for the boots. Scary for me. I have his set. I am keeping them. JR

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            • #21
              Originally posted by elf View Post
              What's work?

              p.s. Try commercial crab fishing if you think 18 hour work days are long
              Iv seen those guys and to me yeah that's a young mans job, and it does redefine the OP some as what actually qualifies for what we call "work"


              But now that we've entered that into the equation --- at least in a 24 period,,, all commercial crab fishermen take a back seat to one little woman I used to date,

              the footrace is called the Leadville 100, that's not one - it's not two - it's not even three, it's FOUR back to back marathons ALL DONE AT ONCE --- and yeah to me it's the definition of insanity --- but as far as staying awake and putting out horsepower? I really don't know of a more extreme example --- especially when sometimes their running through snow sleet rain, and of course totally through the night,,, and I might add all at extreme altitude,, from 9,000 to 12,500 + and all the hills and valleys in-be-tween...

              Yeah - point me towards the fishing boat, sounds like a walk in the park lol

              I don't know if she still does the race - but she's done it multiple times in the past....

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leadville_Trail_100

              BTW -- one of my older brothers has quite a few local awards including runs on pikes peak for his age group, he's seen the all time leader Matt Carpenter run and talked to him - very humble guy, said when the guys in action he's just a blur... don't blink or you'll miss him lol
              Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 02-28-2022, 10:59 AM.

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              • #22
                I worked with a fellow years ago that was newly married and his Wife demanded a New House.This Guy was not interested in making house payments so he worked 14 months straight not one day off averaging 400 hrs a month.He said it was dumbest decision he ever made as his Wife&Boyfreind ended up with the House.

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                • #23
                  Although they don't really compare to some of what I'm reading here, my craziest work weeks came back when I worked for a large printing press manufacturer. I spent about a year and a half on a traveling "task force" (for lack of a better term) made up of an engineering manager, a trainer, a field mechanic, and an engineer from every applicable discipline (HMI software, PLC software, drive specialist, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer). I was the HMI software guy. Our job was to barnstorm across the world visiting "sensitive" high profile customers to address their outstanding issues all at once, in an attempt to restore good faith. I was still pretty new but I guess in the years leading up that point, there were many troubled installations with serious outstanding issues that were never resolved to the customers' satisfaction.

                  We would spend 2 weeks in the office preparing for a site visit, then spend the next 2 weeks at that site, rinse and repeat until we had hit all of them. I seem to recall there being 20-something installations on the list, with several of them being physically next to each other at the same plant, allowing us to hit multiple machines in one visit in those cases.

                  Most were in the US, but there were also several in England, Austria, and Australia, and those were the most taxing because we didn't get any extra time to make up for the additional travel time and jetlag. I can remember going directly from the airport to one of the plants in England to begin work and not getting to the hotel to check in until late that night. That particular visit was busier than most, with issues plaguing us well into the 2nd week (with most of the visits the 2nd week was fairly civilized, ideally turning into a baby sitting exercise by the last day). But those 16 hour days at those customer sites are some of my best working memories because of the bonds we formed and satisfaction of seeing the results of the work put into effect so immediately. Most everyone at the company had a mechanical background, including the managers and trainers. Our trainer would often end up digging into maintenance tasks on one part of the machine while our mechanic (often aided by our manager) was busy installing upgrades and retrofits on another part. If I was in between tasks or waiting on something our trainer would educate me about what he was doing and let me swing a wrench to help out. I got far more out of that experience because of him.

                  I've kept in touch with those guys on-and-off through the years. In fact, I ended up marrying the daughter of the PLC guy that was on our team!
                  Last edited by mars-red; 02-28-2022, 04:12 PM.
                  Max
                  http://joyofprecision.com/

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                  • #24
                    I really don’t talk about my job a lot on here, but it’s absolute hell on me physically in a different kind of way.
                    Day 0, leave the house 6pm to catch flight to LA. Miss the connection in Miami, catch later flight. Arrive in LA 2.5 hours late. I only have a few hours rest before I show up to the freight terminal to fly the airplane to Sydney, Australia. This is a 14+ hour flight. I sleep for a few hours on the flight, best I can. Not counting the commute into work, this is about a 18 hour workday.
                    I rest in Sydney for 24 hours. I then work a flight from Sydney to Singapore. Sit on the ground for 6 hours, fly back to Sydney. This equates to a workday that exceeds 24 hours.
                    The horrible part… I left for Singapore at night. I get back to Sydney at night. I am now flip flopping my schedule to rest at night, only to leave again at night to do another Singapore turn. Except when I got back from Singapore I decided to stay up all night so I wouldn’t flip flop my schedule in Sydney. I go through this two or three more times. Finally, as I type this, I am in Nagoya, Japan. I couldn’t stay awake to go out for dinner, and I couldn’t wake up from a nap. So yet again I’m up all night, to sleep during the day. Except I can’t sleep during the day, I am flying back to Los Angeles. I cannot sleep in Los Angeles, I’m catching a flight home. I can only hope to sleep on my airplane, and try to sleep on a crowded 737 back home.
                    This is what I do every month, for the past 6 years, and what I’m supposed to do for another 20. I’m paid a lot but it isn’t enough for this ****, not doing this for another 20.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                      I worked with a fellow years ago that was newly married and his Wife demanded a New House.This Guy was not interested in making house payments so he worked 14 months straight not one day off averaging 400 hrs a month.He said it was dumbest decision he ever made as his Wife&Boyfreind ended up with the House.
                      Wow --- that's a shame ---- when I first bought my fixer upper I went intermittently mad for months at a time and for years... many 120 hour weeks back to back to back sometimes...

                      some of us guys think that it's a good way to prove your "nesting qualities" to your woman until she feels totally neglected and does an about face lol

                      difference being is I got to keep the house - and now looking back in hindsight it was also a WIN-WIN lol

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                      • #26
                        My day starts at 0600 (dogs wake me- 2 Rottweilers). Drink 1 cup coffee, breakfast at 0900. Out in the shop by 10:30 11:00.Stay busy untill 4:00, in the house for dinner. Visit with the wife , sit around the house till 9:00. In bed by 9:30. I am 80 and retired.

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                        • #27
                          Hats off to you, the longest I’ve done hard physical work was about 11 hrs, I was fit to drop, about a stone lighter and shaking, I would not recommend that as a punishment, I have great sympathy for our flying friend, we used to call shift work poor man’s jet lag, mornings nights afternoons 12 hr shifts, great for a while, after a year without a break I couldn’t remember my own name, I was stunned mind I got a holiday then, I had a heart attack so I got a few month off, nice.
                          I remember my dad saying when I was a kid, “ hard work never killed anyone, but it doesn’t half make a mess of you”, look after yourselves gents, no one else will, and life is shorter than you think.
                          mark

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                          • #28
                            "As you may know I worked highways maintenance too for about 13 years near the end of my tenure in the transportation industry and know how exhausting plowing snow can be.
                            This has got to some of the most mentally intense work I've done, don't think I could have done a 42 hr shift.
                            Not bad enough that there are a lot of hidden treasures underneath the snow, it's people in cars and trucks that scare the daylights out of me.
                            "
                            -Willy

                            Went in to plow "McMansion-ville" one night.
                            Extra large houses, extra wide roads, 6 passes anyway.
                            In one area the road was straight enough to get up some steam and cut it down to 4 passes.
                            Wind and snow blowing, coming over the plow, got up to maybe 25 mph and I started seeing a flicker of light in the snow over the plow...???
                            I slowed enough to where the snow stayed in the plow and then I saw it...a kid on a quad in the middle of the road right in front of me!
                            Slowing down even further I could finally see that he had been pulling a kid who was sitting on a shovel.
                            That kid on the shovel HAD to be IN the plow at some point!
                            I've shot out raccoons and possums before but called the cops on this deal.
                            I wasn't having anything like that to hang over my head for the rest of my life.
                            Len

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
                              "As you may know I worked highways maintenance too for about 13 years near the end of my tenure in the transportation industry and know how exhausting plowing snow can be.
                              This has got to some of the most mentally intense work I've done, don't think I could have done a 42 hr shift.
                              Not bad enough that there are a lot of hidden treasures underneath the snow, it's people in cars and trucks that scare the daylights out of me.
                              "
                              -Willy

                              Went in to plow "McMansion-ville" one night.
                              Extra large houses, extra wide roads, 6 passes anyway.
                              In one area the road was straight enough to get up some steam and cut it down to 4 passes.
                              Wind and snow blowing, coming over the plow, got up to maybe 25 mph and I started seeing a flicker of light in the snow over the plow...???
                              I slowed enough to where the snow stayed in the plow and then I saw it...a kid on a quad in the middle of the road right in front of me!
                              Slowing down even further I could finally see that he had been pulling a kid who was sitting on a shovel.
                              That kid on the shovel HAD to be IN the plow at some point!
                              I've shot out raccoons and possums before but called the cops on this deal.
                              I wasn't having anything like that to hang over my head for the rest of my life.
                              Damn kids! LOL

                              I had an almost identical experience.
                              One night about 8 pm, snowing like crazy way out in the country, I was pushing the windrow way back with a front plow and a wing. Saw this kid on the far side of the road and didn't think too much of it at first other than what's he doing way out here by himself. I glanced back at the windrow to see a kid stick his head out of there.

                              He had tunneled himself into the windrow! Luckily I got the wing up and was able to veer hard to the left missing the little sh*t by what must have been inches.

                              I would have stopped to give them what-for but I was shaking so hard I was scared that they would have had their parents call the cops on me. LOL

                              I got a hold of the local paper the next day and asked them to print a public service announcement warning of the dangers involved with these types of activities.

                              I've had numerous cars run into the back of the wing while trying to pass me on the right, this in spite of being lit up like Vegas on a payday Friday, so it's not just the kids who pull off some bone-headed moves.
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                              Location: British Columbia

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                              • #30
                                moving to a new ERP system.. Starting week 3. It isn't going well.

                                sam

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