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Another project, this one steam related, renovating old steam toy.

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  • #46
    My original Wilesco wore out long ago and the parts were scrapped or used in other projects
    Recently we were fortunate enough to find and purchase an identical outfit, unused, still in original cardboard box, for $ 250 cdn at an estate sale
    .It is currently on top of my chest of drawers in my bedroom.
    OK it is not actually the original one, but it is identical,usuable . immaculate and more importanly, safe to usei if desired.
    It has plenty of " Friends" to keep it company in my room.
    Regards David Powell.

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    • #47
      I'm not interested in cutting holes in it. That's not part of the plan here. Maybe if it cannot be avoided, but..... And, there is no real advantage in cutting a hole. The plate may not come off regardless. Both parts seem to be brass, and brass can corrode to where it seems to "weld" similar to iron. it would involve two holes, a spanner, and a good chance of tearing the holes in the process. Heat and penetrating oil has not worked so far. (yes I will have to "boil out" the oil)

      If it came to that, I'd do better to remove the boiler from the "setting", and then take off one end. That would give perfectly good access, and not have extra new holes right on top of the boiler.

      I have no time pressure on this project, no need to get it done and billed out this month. It's never going to be "billed out", so no issues with having to do things "quick and dirty".

      As for "more importantly, safe to use if desired", that's open, for this one, and perhaps even for your new one, unless you have already tested it. Once I get this one to where it can hold pressure (fixing the whistle issue" I can hydro-test it and see if it is any good. Obviously that cannot be done as long as there is a hole in the boiler that cannot be plugged.

      I'm not interested in just saying "it's old" and giving up on it without having a decent reason why the thing should be considered "not safe". I can calibrate safety valves, so whatever pressure I end up considering it can take, I can set the safeties for. I can do that calibration separately, off the boiler. There is one spring type, and one weight type safety. No fusible plug on the boiler, though.
      CNC machines only go through the motions

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      • #48
        Well, I did manage to deal with the whistle. It became obvious that the corroded doubler piece was not going to unscrew by any force which it is possible to apply through a hole approximately 5.5mm in diameter and 100mm away from the whistle, to a piece approximately 10mm wide.

        So, I sawed the threaded portion of the whistle valve off and let the doubler piece and the threaded spigot drop. It will remain in the boiler, as there is no way to get it out without much more invasive work, which I did not want to do.. The plan is to add an external doubler piece for the whistle to screw into. The whistle valve will be drilled to accept a spigot, which will be threaded on its outboard portion, and will be soldered into the valve body. I will try to make the external doubler plate look decorative if it has to be bigger. If possible, I will make it a simple bush, but the metal is deformed in that area, and I may have to make it larger than a plain round bush.

        In order to avoid damaging the thin boiler shell, I used a piece of thin steel shim stock between the saw and the boiler shell. The only saw I had which I could use in the tiny space available was an X-Acto saw, normally intended for wood. It cut the brass, and at about 12 thou thick, was able to fit under the whistle valve and over the shim stock to make the cut.

        Now, at least, the way forward to a point where a proper hydro test can be made is much clearer. That silly whistle was really stopping everything as far as work is concerned.
        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • #49
          Almost clear how to move forward...... The area where the whistle was is dished inwards a bit, and I need to straighten it out to put a bush there. I'll have to make a "pull fixture" to tug it up into shape, as no hammer that goes through an 8mm hole will do any good.

          That's a problem with a semi-known solution, so it's just a matter of time. (No work on the Rivett today, it was 70 F out and I did yard work.)
          CNC machines only go through the motions

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          • #50
            So, I did manage to straighten out the whistle area "enough". We finished up with the annual local community charity plant sale (had a new record high total money raised, too), so I got to work on it.

            Also got two threaded "bushes" soldered into the boiler, in place of the internal threaded pieces that had fallen off, and are now rattling around inside. I'm pretty sure the solder filled the entire area it was supposed to, but a pressure test will tell the story. The obligatory pics follow.

            Now I have to get a pump to use for the hydraulic pressure test. I need to look around the internet for plans, or design one for myself. Much more fun to make one than to buy one.



            Last edited by J Tiers; 05-02-2022, 10:34 PM.
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #51
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              So, I did manage to straighten out the whistle area "enough". We finished up with the annual local community charity plant sale (had a new record high total money raised, too), so I got to work on it.

              Also got two threaded "bushes" soldered into the boiler, in place of the internal threaded pieces that had fallen off, and are now rattling around inside. I'm pretty sure the solder filled the entire area it was supposed to, but a pressure test will tell the story. The obligatory pics follow.

              Now I have to get a pump to use for the hydraulic pressure test. I need to look around the internet for plans, or design one for myself. Much more fun to make one than to buy one.



              PM Research has a casting kit that you could look into.

              Sid

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              • #52
                Isn't that "cheating"?
                CNC machines only go through the motions

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  .
                  Now I have to get a pump to use for the hydraulic pressure test. I need to look around the internet for plans, or design one for myself. Much more fun to make one than to buy one.
                  Why not just air pressure? Pressure is pressure why go through the trouble to hydraulic pressure test? A gauge could be used and monitored for say 24 hrs to see if there is any leakdown.

                  OR.... if you really want hydraulic just fill it with water to all but a little bit then pressurize it with air.

                  KISS principle at work LOL

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                    Isn't that "cheating"?
                    Depends on how fast you want to get to the end?
                    Making a tool, to make a tool, to finish a project….

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by sid pileski View Post

                      Depends on how fast you want to get to the end?
                      Making a tool, to make a tool, to finish a project….
                      True, but then there is "in stock", "shipping time", and, finally, time to make, if it is a kit.

                      Turns out I have to be out of town for a while now anyway, and also the timeline is not terribly important on this. Even with the pressure test done, the project timing is dependent on another person who also has other things to do. I suppose that means I could easily afford the ordering time.

                      But, a very good point anyway.

                      CNC machines only go through the motions

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

                        Why not just air pressure? Pressure is pressure why go through the trouble to hydraulic pressure test? A gauge could be used and monitored for say 24 hrs to see if there is any leakdown.

                        OR.... if you really want hydraulic just fill it with water to all but a little bit then pressurize it with air.

                        KISS principle at work LOL
                        With just air, because of the high compressibility, it is much more dangerous.

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                        • #57
                          You don't have or can't borrow a Port-a-power or Enerpac pump?

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                            ...
                            Now I have to get a pump to use for the hydraulic pressure test. I need to look around the internet for plans, or design one for myself. Much more fun to make one than to buy one.
                            Old grease gun with appropriate gauging?

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                            • #59
                              I have a Porto-power, but it uses oil, special connectors, and I don't need 4000psi. I will use a feedwater pump in the future so no issues there.

                              Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

                              Why not just air pressure? Pressure is pressure why go through the trouble to hydraulic pressure test? A gauge could be used and monitored for say 24 hrs to see if there is any leakdown.

                              OR.... if you really want hydraulic just fill it with water to all but a little bit then pressurize it with air.

                              KISS principle at work LOL
                              I am not fond of working with unexploded ordnance. Water pressure is far safer.

                              With air pressure, if there is a failure, the bomb goes off. Pieces fly around. Not good.

                              With water pressure, some water spurts out, end of story.
                              CNC machines only go through the motions

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                              • #60
                                Unexploded Ordinance???, Bomb???? No more dangerous than pumping up a bicycle tire. I would thing the volume of air under pressure would determine the extent of "danger due to a failure". Just my humble opinion. Rick

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