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Interesting use of a lathe

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  • #16
    Originally posted by oxford View Post
    I saw this video pop up.
    There must be similarities in our YouTube profiles. The suggestion algorithm brought this to me as well.

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    • #17
      Interesting way of using a lathe that I haven't seen before. A little crude on the indexing though, and no way to lock it in positively. If I was doing that, the shaft would have rotated slightly on me and screwed it all up. As for the shape of the resulting 'teeth'- yes, a grind on the drill bit would have changed that. But you are also looking at a very small material removal rate, especially at the tip of the drill bit. It's ingenious, and a way to get the job done if there is no other way, or proper tool to cut the gullets.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #18
        Hmmm..... now I am wondering if I should keep a look out for rusty old iron to use for experimentation.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by boslab View Post
          Stanko ant it seems TOS can run in neutral, with a stanko you have to contrive a spindle lock as it floats about but other than that the carriage powers with the spindle static, I suppose it’s going to wear the hell out of the leadscrew nuts, using it as a planer but with a milling cutter and a powered spindle it might be an ok solution ( I’ve only tinkered with a thread milling attachment on a lathe once, it worked but I certainly hit the depth by luck I think)
          mark
          I have a Stanko lathe. Maybe have to look to see if it will run in neutral. Not that I would need it but just to know. It does have a separate motor for the rapids and I have used it to cut an internal keyway taking light cuts. I don't remember why I didn't use my shaper but there must have been a reason.
          Location: The Black Forest in Germany

          How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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          • #20
            The CNC lathes that I have used allow feed when the spindle is not rotating using a rapid move, slow the rapid move to the desired rate and scrape away.

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            • #21
              Deviating a little here, but not too much- has anyone purchased and used pinion shafting? What did you do with it?
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #22
                The concept of slotting something using that trick is very interesting. And not only for gears... although I'll have to watch it to see what the fuss is about. I'm thinking that things like keyways or slotting rounded grip features would make this a pretty slick trick.
                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by tim clarke View Post

                  fix
                  it
                  again
                  tony
                  fix
                  it
                  again
                  tomorrow

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                  • #24
                    There are a lot of posts here complaining about the tooth form... He wasn't making a gear, he was making a splined shaft. I suspect the use of the word "gear" in the title is a result of English being a second language.

                    He posts another video about making an "internal gear" that mates with the splined shaft he just made here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BczEh2hFFrY

                    I think it's brilliant. I've done this many times to make keyways and splines but never made the leap to using a live center. I cranked that bastard by hand...

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                    • #25
                      He never showed if the 2 parts fit together...
                      Kansas City area

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