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I always wanted to learn how to true a machine. I never did. I got some scrapers...

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  • #61
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    Hahaa! I have shown this mill before. Ok, not so much scrapped (yeah, had to look that word up) but flaked, I call them oil catchers..

    I ripped the side box off, gutted the rear box and installed my own electrical to work with my machine control. Same as Ol Man John had. Ah-Ha CNC control. So a PC and monitor sits on the side where the smaller of the massive cabinets was. Cant see the other Ways cause the table is in the Way, Im sure they are there somewhere though JR
    Why so eager to unload a machine that appears to be in good mechanical condition?
    Is this the same mill from a previous post that you offered as, "Free to a good home (shop)"?

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    • #62
      Originally posted by JRouche View Post

      Hahaa! I have shown this mill before. Ok, not so much scrapped (yeah, had to look that word up) but flaked, I call them oil catchers..

      I ripped the side box off, gutted the rear box and installed my own electrical to work with my machine control. Same as Ol Man John had. Ah-Ha CNC control. So a PC and monitor sits on the side where the smaller of the massive cabinets was. Cant see the other Ways cause the table is in the Way, Im sure they are there somewhere though JR

      The bridgeport BOSS mills had chrome plated ways, for that reason they hold up extremely well. Later manual machines also had chrome ways as a option I believe.

      I have a Boss 3 that the ways look about the same.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

        Why so eager to unload a machine that appears to be in good mechanical condition?
        Is this the same mill from a previous post that you offered as, "Free to a good home (shop)"?
        Haha. You like those slick ways huh? Like sparky said, they are chromed. And flaked. JR

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        • #64
          Originally posted by JRouche View Post

          Haha. You like those slick ways huh? Like sparky said, they are chromed. And flaked. JR
          My Bridgeport is from the 1950's, not hard chromed, the flaking LONG gone. As clapped out as it is, still runs circles around a light duty import bench mill.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by RB211 View Post

            My Bridgeport is from the 1950's, not hard chromed, the flaking LONG gone. As clapped out as it is, still runs circles around a light duty import bench mill.
            Exactly! RB... I am not a machinist so any machine is a dream for me. I got this machine years ago to do some CNC work. Now its just too big for my small two car garage home shop.. She needs to sprout some wings and be free from me.

            And No, Reggie. I have never posted a freebie thing here I think? If it were a give away it would not be sitting on my concrete right now JR

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            • #66
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              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

              Well, show us pics of the front and back of this thing. Maybe the parts are not all there, or they are the wrong parts.

              The shank should have a taper on it. That is how it releases and tightens. Maybe Bubba was there before you and put it on really tight. Or maybe Bubba thought it was loose and pulled out the Mig to "tack it so it stays where it belongs".
              Thanks J. Here are some other pics. I thought the clamp thing should slide one direction or the other to release the bit. Wont budge... Any help? Thanks. JR

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              • #67
                Looks pretty normal, other than not seeing the notches which mine have (they may be there, and just be covered up). Without those, and without the raised areas of the actual blade to fit in them, it may have to be considerably tighter to hold the blade in position.

                But, no matter what, the separate "clasp" part slides down toward the end to release the blade. However, you do not really need to take them out to sharpen. I generally do it with the blade in place, but mine, being carbide, are thicker at the end. You just need to be more careful when sharpening to get the right angle.

                Those look a lot more like they are sharpened to be gasket scrapers than for scraping CI. The angle is a positive rake and only on one edge for the top one in last pic..

                For a scraper to do cast iron, the edge is generally sharpened about 5 deg negative rake. That is less than the angle I see on the top one in the last pic. Not sure the bottom one has any angle on it.
                CNC machines only go through the motions

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  Looks pretty normal, other than not seeing the notches which mine have (they may be there, and just be covered up). Without those, and without the raised areas of the actual blade to fit in them, it may have to be considerably tighter to hold the blade in position.

                  But, no matter what, the separate "clasp" part slides down toward the end to release the blade. However, you do not really need to take them out to sharpen.
                  Thanks. Thats actually helpful, knowing which direction to go. I just want to take them apart to clean them and maybe use a carbide bit instead. Thanks. JR

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                    Looks pretty normal, other than not seeing the notches which mine have (they may be there, and just be covered up). Without those, and without the raised areas of the

                    I generally do it with the blade in place, but mine, being carbide, are thicker at the end. You just need to be more careful when sharpening to get the right angle.
                    just made a batch as you described, thicker @ the carbide..makes it much easier to hone the faces, but does create a challenge in keeping it flat when grinding he end.. I used some aluminum flashing to make shims for the thinner shank that let the whole thing lay flat. Pretty easy & quick, even if your shims aren't spot on thickness, it will still be consistent & you can compensate in the table angle if needed.
                    "it is no measure of mental health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." -- krishnamurti
                    "look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." -- albert einstien
                    "any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex...It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction."

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