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O T. Best way to retire I ever saw !

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  • O T. Best way to retire I ever saw !

    Thirty odd years ago I worked for a small firm. My Foreman was a kindly cheerful fellow who had been there since the building's foundations had been poured, he was a bit over retirement age but still strong as a bull and sharp as a tack.
    One day he walked in looking rather sad, on questioning he said that he had filled in his tax forms, and because of taxes on his investments and savings he was working for cents on the dollar and thought it time to finally retire.
    He went to see the managing Director( Bruce Who he had actually hired as office boy some forty years before) and returned smiling like a Cheshire Cat ( Smile from Ear to Ear). He simply said I will finish six months on Friday,It is fixed with Bruce
    That week he left work about 15 minutes early on the Friday, The next week he left a half hour early on Friday. Gradually he stopped coming in on Fridays, then Thursdays, then Wednesdays, Towards retirement day he would come in on only Monday mornings and if everything was running smoothly would have a coffee with us in the canteen at break, then go home.
    We had a great collection for him, got him a Gun dog, shortwave radio outfit and a model cannon as presents and he lived on to a long and happy retirement.
    He gave me his toolbox and I still use it to this day.
    Do any of you have good stories about leaving jobs to retire in style?
    Regards David Powell

  • #2
    Can't think of any right off but sure enjoyed that one thanks Dave...

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    • #3
      That was an excellent story David.

      When I retired I picked up my coffee cup, rather a soup bowl and waked out the back door after getting off the phone with the retirement board. It seems where I worked once the board passes the retirement in front of them its immediate on my side just as fast. My co-workers said leave, you are retired. I didnt know....

      I like "The Foreman". We never got his name? I saw Bruce the hire he did. The Foreman is my type of Person. Thanks David. JR

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      • #4
        My friend, Jim, was a career fighter jockey. His last ride was F-4's in Vietnam. On his next to last mission, after landing, he found 2 MPs in a jeep waiting for him. He asked what's up? They told him he had a meeting with the old man, and hop in. So he went to command, and told the clerk that he had a meeting with the CO. The clerk ushered him into the CO's office, whereupon the old man
        said, "sit down, Harris." then he pulled a bottle of scotch from his desk, poured 2 glasses, and said, "Harris, you're outa here, pack your gear". Jim looked at him with the unspoken question, and the CO replied "No man in my command goes down on his last mission".

        Both these men were class acts, RIP Jim, And the Old Man, whoever he was!

        And that, my friends, is the right way to retire from flying fighters in combat
        I cut it off twice; it's still too short
        Oregon, USA

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        • #5
          The Foreman was John Gravljs, originally from Latvia. He had a lifetime of stories to tell, and told them well. Perhaps I have been lucky but in my working years I was able to learn a lot from nearly everyone I worked with and for. Regards David Powell,

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          • #6
            Retirements at my company vary from the best case, "last flight with crew members you wanted to fly with and get the fire truck salute" to just as common, "crew scheduling changed your last flight, you already flew your last flight, and no one organized the fire trucks. Hand in your stuff by xx date or you will be charged, kicked to the curb"
            Needless to say, I'm not waiting til retirement age to retire, and it will be my own decision, not the FAA's.

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            • #7
              Summers are short in the Yukon, so when an clerk friend of mine was looking retire, she thought she'd have to miss one more, working through a last summer to get to her November birthday and eligibility. Turned out she'd forgotten she could 'cash in' 30 odd years of unused sick leave. She had a quite unglamorous and demanding job, never took a sick day that I can recall, and was the least complaining person I ever knew.

              I swear she floated down the sidewalk coming back from personnel that May morning. She found out that if she stopped working just three days later, she'd barely have burned off her sick leave when she hit her 60th, and could have a truly wonderful summer off after all. I can't remember seeing a happier person...

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              • #8
                Another good way to do it is about six months before you leave, go ahead and retire, but don't tell anyone. It's called "Retire in Place"

                Ed
                For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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                • #9
                  Sort of sad when you consider the above comments, and I didn't retire until i was 78 ..and without a pension..maybe that's why 🙄

                  Any way I was 22 and working nights ( 3-12) in a shop and Charlie was going to retire Friday and i was somewhat upset because
                  I would not be there at noon when the cake, handshakes and refreshments happened and he would leave for good.
                  Well, I got to work about 3 and went into the locker room and it was like a morgue -no one talking-- and I sat on the bench to change shoes and one of the guys
                  leaving the day shift said 'don't sit there....that's where Charlie died this noon " -- He went in the locker room to change clothes for the party and I guess he had a heart attack and died
                  The party started and they waited for him to come out and he never did .... needless to say I was shocked and never forgot how fast we lost him...
                  Retirement should be a happy occasion , so if you get it , feel fortunate !
                  Rich
                  Green Bay, WI

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                  • #10
                    When my time came due, I decided to work another two years. Then I celebrated my retirement and my birthday (and the birthdays of about 20 other people born in my month) with a big party. We had a live band, lots of giveaways, food- and lots of staff to keep things in line. We called it April Babies Birthday Bash, and held it at a local pub. Then two years later did it again at a different pub. It was celebrating life more than anything. Now it's a few years later and I've lost a few more friends in that time. Sometime soon we will be celebrating their lives. And that's the key I think- celebrate your lives every day. You are not guaranteed one more day so to retire with a good attitude is the best way.

                    I no longer do cabinet building, but I do still have the option of using the shop for my own projects- and that has been important to me. I always did try to maintain a good relationship with all the people I've worked with, and for, and that's something about myself I can be proud of. It helps keep me young and vital, and able to enjoy my retirement. I can never sit and do nothing for long, so I've gotten involved in a recording studio since I've always loved music and the adventures it has taken me on. Now I'm paying it forward, and that makes me feel good. Life after retirement is certainly an adjustment, but it's largely up to the individual what you make of it.

                    Best way to retire- relax, keep breathing, keep laughing, keep moving, stay involved with your people. Give back what you can. Get out and enjoy nature. Don't worry about the time too much, and don't worry about things you can't do anymore. Just keep living.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by David Powell View Post
                      Thirty odd years ago I worked for a small firm. My Foreman was a kindly cheerful fellow who had been there since the building's foundations had been poured, he was a bit over retirement age but still strong as a bull and sharp as a tack.
                      One day he walked in looking rather sad, on questioning he said that he had filled in his tax forms, and because of taxes on his investments and savings he was working for cents on the dollar and thought it time to finally retire.
                      He went to see the managing Director( Bruce Who he had actually hired as office boy some forty years before) and returned smiling like a Cheshire Cat ( Smile from Ear to Ear). He simply said I will finish six months on Friday,It is fixed with Bruce
                      That week he left work about 15 minutes early on the Friday, The next week he left a half hour early on Friday. Gradually he stopped coming in on Fridays, then Thursdays, then Wednesdays, Towards retirement day he would come in on only Monday mornings and if everything was running smoothly would have a coffee with us in the canteen at break, then go home.
                      We had a great collection for him, got him a Gun dog, shortwave radio outfit and a model cannon as presents and he lived on to a long and happy retirement.
                      He gave me his toolbox and I still use it to this day.
                      Do any of you have good stories about leaving jobs to retire in style?
                      Regards David Powell
                      I read the entire story, of course. I was looking for a name. JR No name?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Tim Clarke View Post
                        My friend, Jim, was a career fighter jockeyI am going to say. He was top notch...

                        And that, my friends, is the right way to retire from flying fighters in combat
                        t is, a hard life, There is a saying. If it flies Iyt dies. JJust the way it is, JR

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                        • #13
                          Oh? What I meant to say is the Russians dont have anything. Yeah, got some tny info. JR

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                          • #14
                            In the UK retired railwaymen get free travel. A friend bought a cottage 300 miles away and just pops down for a couple of days if he wants. Even easier than if you got free petrol just sitting in the train. At school a friend's father was an airline pilot and got free standby tickets. He had great holidays all over the world.
                            I need to retire soon. You used to have to go when you got to the age and had preparation courses and pension advice. Don't think that happens now. I'd like to do part time but they can't put in for a replacement unless I actually quit. Got to get my own laptop, phone, printer, copier, and pay full price for cable TV and broadband. eeeek. Worst of all I have always fobbed off people who ask me to do things by saying 'maybe have time when I retire' and they are all going to come calling.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Baz View Post
                              ...
                              Worst of all I have always fobbed off people who ask me to do things by saying 'maybe have time when I retire' and they are all going to come calling.
                              "I don't know when I can get to it, but if you leave it, I'll call you when it's done."
                              Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 04-04-2022, 07:35 PM.

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