Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Thread Locking for Loose threads

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Thread Locking for Loose threads

    I have a loose fit on some threads that I cut . They lock up tight but I am looking for a thread locking compound that will fill in the slop.

  • #2
    As in locking it so it doesn't come loose? Loctite or other brand thread locker would do that for you. Pick the color based on how permanent and what sort of load it has to resist.

    Or are you wanting a running fit and just want to fill in the sloppiness? For that I have no idea since even a running fit needs SOME play. And any filler would fill 100%.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

    Comment


    • #3
      Without trying to be facetious why not just recut the tread to a better fit

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by rolland View Post
        Without trying to be facetious why not just recut the tread to a better fit
        If that was possible, I would have done it!

        Comment


        • #5
          This might work, you should put some release agent of some sort on the male thread, I think. Amazon.com: Loctite 236382 4.8-ML. Form-A-Thread Stripped Thread Repair Kit : Tools & Home Improvement Failing that, Helicoil.....or if it's the male thread that's too loose, sometimes a wrap of small copper wire around the threads will tighten things up.
          Last edited by Video Man; 04-06-2022, 11:55 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Get some Devcon plastic steel epoxy, works great on sloppy fits. Clean it up real good first. Heat will be the only way to get it apart without breaking something.

            Comment


            • #7
              Just run the lathe in reverse and put some metal back on.

              -D
              DZER

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                Just run the lathe in reverse and put some metal back on.

                -D
                Now why didn’t I think of that!😊
                Now I will have to dig out the right chips to put the metal back on!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I had a production manager believing that was possible
                  at a meeting in the front office. Really.

                  It is called NTPMTD.
                  Non Technical People Making Technical Decisions.
                  Today, if you have an MBA degree, you can murder
                  somebody and HR will help you bury the body in the
                  back yard.

                  -D
                  DZER

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                    Just run the lathe in reverse and put some metal back on.

                    -D
                    Can you show me how to do this LOL

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RB140 View Post
                      Can you show me how to do this LOL
                      I would but I am not sure how to use my video editing software
                      to make a video play in reverse yet

                      -D
                      DZER

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Take the male part. put in hydraulic press, ovalise ( If that is such a word) the part till the female part will just tightly screw on. Go to pub, get rolling drunk and forget about what you did. If anyone ever complains blame bad lathe bearings. Regards David Powell.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It would seem to me that coating the threads with a coat (or maybe 2 or 3) of lacquer or enamel, and letting dry well, would take up the slack. O course, depending on the frequency of assembly/disassembly, it would eventually rub off in the tighter areas, but not in the looser spots.
                          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by David Powell View Post
                            Take the male part. put in hydraulic press, ovalise ( If that is such a word) the part till the female part will just tightly screw on. Go to pub, get rolling drunk and forget about what you did. If anyone ever complains blame bad lathe bearings. Regards David Powell.
                            I have an old (1910?) O.C. White lamp that, sometime in the past,
                            got missing a #14-20 nut. Someone took a 1/4-20 hex nut and
                            squished it a bit, so the threads meshed just right about perfect,
                            on 2 sides ! ! ! I have the lamp in my shop and I love this lost
                            nut fix workaround.
                            I have done a similar squish technique on a wing nut that I left in the Evaporust too long.
                            It became loose on the mating bolt. So I squished the wing nut slightly in the press and
                            make it slightly oval. Now the threads fit tight, and I saved my special wing nut.
                            I have even squished bronze acme nuts that are worn with too much backlash in the press
                            to tighten them up a bit. This was a temporary fix to put off making a new one when I had
                            more time. But it worked and may serve me well for a few years.

                            --Doozer
                            DZER

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Just a thought if it is the bolt try putting fine knurl on it it may expand the bolt enough to make a tighter fit I did this on a rod once that was loose in a bore it did help for what I was doing but like I said it is just a thought

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X