Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

selling scrap carbide

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • selling scrap carbide

    Anybody try the company that advertises at the top of the page at times?

    I've got a bunch of solid drills and stuff...not a bunch in an industrial sense, but a bunch to me.

  • #2
    The salvage yard I frequent has four 55-gallon drums full of carbide bits. I dig through it when I need a few pieces. It's good to keep some of it, especially drills, for making form tools or special cutters.

    Comment


    • #3
      How is carbide recycled? They don't just melt it down like steel, CI, aluminum, etc.., do they?
      As I understand it, carbide cutters are sintered from a powdered form.
      Does that mean they grind it up into a powder, then resinter the stuff?
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

      Comment


      • #4
        Don't be throwing that stuff out! I did a little checking and found this recent post on another forum.

        http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.c...=141893&page=1

        Bottom line: It's like gold, well, not quite but it's worth a lot. A coffee can of used carbide is worth $200 to $300 at $5.00 per pound.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

        Comment


        • #5
          thanks, looks like about 5 - 7 bucks a pound. Kennametal has it listed at 7 /lb right now.

          Comment


          • #6
            Watch Batteries

            Another often overlooked item with scrap value is silver oxide watch/electronics bateries. A jewely friend used to take them to New York and sell them for $ 16 a pound and that was about 15 years ago.
            Tin
            Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

            Comment


            • #7
              I don't know about the comapny listed here,but I am fixing to find out.

              I got 80-90lbs of new carbide woodworking inserts and 30lbs of busted tooling.I keep you posted.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

              Comment


              • #8
                I am told by my wife that Carbide Processors, Inc. has a reputation as a good reliable company.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                Comment


                • #9
                  Lynnl,

                  I found the answer to your question.

                  Clean cemented carbide inserts and compacts are converted to powder by the zinc process (treatment with molten zinc which is dissolved in the cobalt phase and is then distilled off, leaving a spongy material which is easily crushed). This powder is added back to the manufacture of ready-to-press powder. By this process, not only tungsten carbide but also cobalt, tantalum carbide and other carbides are recycled.
                  http://www.azom.com/details.asp?ArticleID=1201

                  Note: when they say "the cobalt phase" they mean the cobalt that is used as the binder for the tungsten carbide. Cemented tungsten carbide tools are cemented with cobalt metal. The zinc alloys with the cobalt and leaves behind the tungsten carbide.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks Evan. That was a pretty informative read.

                    It brought to mind something I've noticed before at times. Some carbide tools, e.g. carbide tips on saw blades, have a somewhat shiny, slightly silvery appearance. While others such as almost all of the carbide endmills and metal cutting items I have will have a much darker, almost blackish appearance, tho still shiny.

                    After reading that website discussion I'm suspecting the difference in appearance relates to a variation in the ratio of carbide (or possibly other elements) alloyed with the tungsten. I'm sure, as with steel, that there's probably hundreds or thousands of different alloys produced.
                    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lynnl
                      Thanks Evan. That was a pretty informative read.

                      It brought to mind something I've noticed before at times. Some carbide tools, e.g. carbide tips on saw blades, have a somewhat shiny, slightly silvery appearance. While others such as almost all of the carbide endmills and metal cutting items I have will have a much darker, almost blackish appearance, tho still shiny.

                      After reading that website discussion I'm suspecting the difference in appearance relates to a variation in the ratio of carbide (or possibly other elements) alloyed with the tungsten. I'm sure, as with steel, that there's probably hundreds or thousands of different alloys produced.
                      At one time a lot of woodworking carbide used a nickel binder.I never learned exactly why,but I did hear that it made machine brazing much easier which sounds plausible.

                      The Kennametal site mentioned something about not wanting carbide with nickel binders,dunno why,maybe because they are stricly a metal working tool company?
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X