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Explain to me why precision stones

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  • #31
    That looks like a pretty good collection. My stone draw has about 1/5 that many. So far I have tried to keep them in the original containers but that is getting a bit unwieldy.

    One thing that I learned about abrasives while making a telescope mirror was the dangers of a stray particle of grit finding it's way into a finer grade. When making mirrors, that one particle can ruin many hours of work. You may say that is not as much of a concern with stones as opposed to loose abrasive, but it can still happen.

    I am thinking about clear plastic tubes for the ones with smaller cross sections. That would provide a lot of protection against banging together and also isolation against abrasive wandering from one grade to the next.

    I too have used the ultrasonic to clean stones. It works great with just a few drops of Dawn dish detergent. And they do not fall apart.



    Originally posted by JRouche View Post
    Speaking of stones.. A year or more ago I wanted to send my stone collection through my ultrasonic cleaner, they were pretty nasty and I like clean tools.

    I was afraid I would come back the next day and there would just be a mud pile in the bottom of the cleaner. There was not.. I said I was gonna share the results and dont remember if I did.. I found these just sitting in a corner of the garage all cleaned up and no where to go.

    How do you store a bunch of stones like this? I suspect they shouldn't rub together like files?

    Anyway, the U/S cleaner works JR

    Click image for larger version

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    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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    • #32
      For any of the rougher and more routine flattening tasks, I suggest you make a couple of "burr files" to do those. They are easily made, easily touched up, and can handle rougher jobs easily.

      One coarse, and one finer, plus possibly a half-round or other shape to get into corners.
      4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

      CNC machines only go through the motions

      "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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      • #33
        I made a burr file to remove the myriad of dings in the bed of my Denford lathe, after being advised about them. It did work fantastically well. I wouldn't use it when scraping though.
        Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

        Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
        Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
        Monarch 10EE 1942

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Peter. View Post
          ........................... I wouldn't use it when scraping though.
          Why not? If properly made they will not damage the surface any more than the (much harder) ground stone will.

          I do. They work very well, and are a LOT better IMO than the usual india stone that is widely recommended in the literature. The stone loads up fast, and does not effectively remove everything, unless you work harder at it. And, the traditional stone has cutting particles that actually will remove material from a perfectly flat surface.

          The burr file glides over the surface when it has removed all of what you need to remove, which normally does not require much effort.

          It's good to actually use the india stone from time to time, as the grinding action is beneficial. Especially as a final finisher. At that point it won't take off anything important, but it will finish the job of flattening any serrations on top of the high spots. If not removed, those will wear down fast in any case, and require adjustments.

          You probably could also use a "precision" ground stone. (I surely hate that word "precision".... it is overused to the point of becoming like "billet".)
          4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

          CNC machines only go through the motions

          "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
            I am thinking about clear plastic tubes for the ones with smaller cross sections. That would provide a lot of protection against banging together and also isolation against abrasive wandering from one grade to the next.
            Excellent idea, I hadent thought to use those. Keeps them from bouncing off ea. other and keeps the cross contamination down. Im going tube hunting today. Thanks.

            I wounder if they come in "Billet Plastic" JR

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            • #36
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

              Why not? If properly made they will not damage the surface any more than the (much harder) ground stone will.

              You probably could also use a "precision" ground stone. (I surely hate that word "precision".... it is overused to the point of becoming like "billet".)
              I am assuming you are talking about rotary burr files? If so Im out. I am Lousy with those things.. I have some good ones too. I have tried the 1/4" size all the way down to the dentist size. I just cant control them very well and end up Not doing what I wanted. I think its my inability to "free hand" much of anything.. And yes, I have practiced for 25+ years now, same results. Five slivers all over the place, god forbid Im doing stainless (those slivers suck!). Now if I could CNC the burr I might do ok, no, probably not, just as bad.

              Ill get a billet file next time
              Yeah, the whole precision thing probably stems from the marketers trying to one-up man the next tool marketer. Cause I do think some tools fall under the precision umbrella, I might have one around here. Certainly not a stone though.. JR

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              • #37
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                Why not? If properly made they will not damage the surface any more than the (much harder) ground stone will.
                Just personal preference. I don't find that my stones damage the scraping surface. I'm scraping a cast iron square right now and the finish is coming out very nice.
                Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                Monarch 10EE 1942

                Comment


                • #38
                  The flattened stones don't do any damage. But they have a little less smoothing action than india stones, and the usage is a bit rough for the flattened stones.
                  4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                  CNC machines only go through the motions

                  "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    I use a 'burr file'* to knock the burrs off when scraping. I also use a relatively soft 'india' stone towards the later stages in order to broaden the points.

                    *An Oregon brand (actually Vallorbe) single cut, smooth, file that has had the edges taken off with the surface grinder.
                    Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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                    • #40
                      I use a burr file as well, but its not going to help much on a hardened part
                      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                      • #41
                        someone mind clarifying what a burr file is? when I search, all I get is rotary burs and that doesn't sound like what ya'll are talking about?
                        "it is no measure of mental health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." -- krishnamurti
                        "look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." -- albert einstien
                        "any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex...It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction."

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                        • #42
                          A standard flat file that you have modified by grinding the tips off the teeth. Same idea as the stones, it has no effect on a flat surface, but cuts off any burrs and dings that stick up.

                          Good for much rougher work than the stones would be suitable for, but if not used for rough stuff are also suitable for cleaning up after a scraping pass, before wiping clean and spotting.

                          Most folks make them from broken sections of file, as they are handier that way, after the sharp broken edges and side teeth have been ground smooth..
                          4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                          CNC machines only go through the motions

                          "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            This is about as good as I can do in terms of scraping. Scraped with a Biax and using a flat SC stone to de-burr. I'm very happy with it. I ran my repeat-o-meter along the face and it showed less than 1um. Probably less than half actually.

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                            I took it outside to get a good close-up of the scraping.

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                            I don't find that the stone does any kind of damage, it would surely show up in this photo if it did.
                            Last edited by Peter.; 04-17-2022, 03:05 PM.
                            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                            Monarch 10EE 1942

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                            • #44
                              What radius tip are you going down to on the Biax?
                              Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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                              • #45
                                I dunno Mark I gave my radius gauge away. Probably 60mm or so I should say.
                                Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                                Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                                Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                                Monarch 10EE 1942

                                Comment

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